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Karol Cooper

Associate Professor


Contact
310 Marano Campus Center
315.312.2614
karol.cooper@oswego.edu

Office hours

Fall 2016
Tuesday & Thursday
12:45 - 2:00
or by appointment

Classes taught

Spring 2017 Schedule

ENG 265/800 MWF 10:20-11:15 208 Marano CC
ENG 350/800 MWF 12:40-1:35 306 Marano CC

ENG 540/800

MWF

12:40-1:35

306 Marano CC

ENG 265-If you enjoy exploring the history of gender issues in literature, you will likely be interested in this course. We will read works from different genres, including poetry, drama, a conduct manual and the novel, written in Britain from the late 1600s to the mid 1700s. Towards the end of the course, we will focus mostly on the genre of the satirical novel, which was a popular way for British writers, particularly women writers, to critique gender roles, romance, prostitution, marriage and sexual violence.

Critical readings will discuss the predominant themes of social rank, wealth, violence, virtue, truth and the sexual double standard that permitted a man to have sex outside of marriage, while casting the woman out of society if she was caught doing the same thing. How did the debate about women’s and men’s roles contribute to the development of different literary genres, particularly the development of the modern novel?  To answer that question, we will approach the literary texts from a formal perspective, looking for moments when writers use literary self-reflexivity to call into question the genre’s own formal traditions and moral function. Coursework: 1 short paper, blog postings of critical analysis of literary artifacts, several handwritten short interpretative analyses of passages from literary texts, several handwritten summaries of critical texts, 1 presentation, 1 final research project.

ENG 350-We will read plays from the U.S. and around the world, with a focus on avant-garde playwrights whose works were, and are still, considered shocking in their ability to tear down and re-construct the norms of performance, protest, and the drama itself as an art form. Playwrights will include Samuel Beckett, Yukio Mishima, Adrienne Kennedy and Young Jean Lee. Coursework: 1 short paper, blog postings of critical analysis of literary artifacts, several handwritten short interpretative analyses of passages from literary texts, several handwritten summaries of critical texts, 1 presentation, and 1 final research project.

ENG 540-We will read plays from the U.S. and around the world, with a focus on avant-garde playwrights whose works were, and are still, considered shocking in their ability to tear down and re-construct the norms of performance, protest, and the drama itself as an art form. Playwrights will include Samuel Beckett, Yukio Mishima, Adrienne Kennedy and Young Jean Lee. Coursework: 1 short paper, blog postings of critical analysis of literary artifacts, several handwritten short interpretative analyses of passages from literary texts, several handwritten summaries of critical texts, 1 presentation, and 1 final research project.