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Elizabeth Bishop

Adjunct Instructor


Contact

318 Marano Campus Center
315.312.2624
ebishop@oswego.edu

Office hours

Spring 2017
Monday, Wednesday & Friday
8:00 - 9:00
or by appointment

Elizabeth Bishop

Classes taught

Fall 2017 Courses

ENG 102/640 MWF 12:40-1:35 256 Marano CC
HON 204/810 MWF 10:20-11:15 223 Marano CC

ENG 102-Practice in college level writing, includes preparation of a research paper.

HON 204/810-The theme of this course is New Orleans, Louisiana and the Gulf Coast Region. In this class we will analyze a series of issues which define the city, from its unique history of slavery to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina (August 2005). Because this class is made up of students with a variety of interests I strongly encourage students to do independent research, which you can use to augment the class and your essays, with my prior approval. Each class we will discuss the assigned reading for the day, and pose questions to each other about it.

While most of the readings in this class are not literature per se we will engage in reading practices that are indeed literary. This means recognizing the rhetorical elements that populate a text such as narrative, metaphor and trope. Whether reading history, memoir or novel we will examine the stakes the author sets out and how they influence the reader. Understanding how these elements operate allow us to determine the ideological and aesthetic qualities a text may have. This is the beginning of critical thinking. Our subject, the city of New Orleans, indeed encourages such thinking through its history of hybridization, transgression, and tragedy. 

From this follows the form of your assignments: the essay. As you analyze other texts your own needs as an author will become apparent. What are the ideological stakes of your writing? What value system does your text communicate? What paradigms do you reaffirm? Which do you transgress? One cannot think critically about language without also considering her/his own position within it. Thus, our subject provides not only a chronicle of facts, but an opportunity to learn more about our own selves as writers.