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One video, 60 seconds, countless reasons to consider SUNY Oswego.

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Oswego rising

Lakeshore college continues climb in ratings, reviews.

With a growing number of Spanish speakers and expanded job opportunities for those with Spanish-language skills, the importance of this major — which you can also combine with many other majors — continues to grow.


The study of modern languages, literatures and cultures helps emphasize similarities and improve communication between people and nations in our global society. Our department of languages and literatures, among the largest in the SUNY system, offers learning in small classes led by faculty who encourage active use of your chosen language, as well as many study-abroad opportunities.

Launch your career

Opportunities

Practice your language skills at the weekly international coffee hour and in the friendly department’s foyer. Attend foreign films, lectures, discussions and field trips, and participate in Hispanic Heritage Month and other programs. Take advantage of study-aborad programs in Barcelona and Latin America, or enroll in a Global Cities course that takes you to Madrid.

Outcomes

Opportunities include

  • Teaching
  • Government
  • Foreign trade
  • Travel
  • Publishing
  • Banking
  • Tourism
  • Intelligence

Graduate studies may include

  • Spanish
  • Languages
  • Education

Facilities

A multimedia laboratory with developing computer programs complements classroom instruction.

“Whether it is 'walking down the runway' to practice clothing vocabulary or 'completing tasks around the classroom' to practice daily chores, the learning that takes place (in Distinguished Teaching Professor Tracy K. Lewis' classroom) isn't copying notes from the board but instead becoming part of the lesson.”

— Brianna Carnevale ’14