2019 Schedule

Quest is excited to announce the new Mobile App to better view and plan your day!

Please join us in celebrating the more than 350 presenters as we explore all areas of research at SUNY Oswego.

Join the mobile app by downloading Attendify from the App Store or Google Play.

Create a free account and search for Quest 2019. The link will take you directly to what you will need. Once you have joined, you can view the full schedule, as well as search by presenter name, presentation title, or topic area. You can also save your favorites and make notes about sessions you want to attend.

Download the App

 

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Quest 2019 overview and spotlight sessions

5:00 – 7:00 p.m. (April 2) Quest kick-off at the Syracuse Campus.

8:00 – Noon Welcome & Red Carpet Selfie Station.

Student participation certificates available for pickup until 4:00 p.m. Coffee and light snacks available.

Marano Campus Center, Concourse

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. Spotlight Panel #1: Fresh Water For All - Puerto Rico Alternative Break Initiative

132 Marano Campus Center Auditorium

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. Spotlight Panel #2: I, Too, Am Study Abroad (ITASA)

132 Marano Campus Center Auditorium

11:30 a.m. – 4:50 p.m. Spotlight Panel #3: Creative Collaboration Between Lighting and Projection Media

133 Marano Campus Center

Noon – 12:30 p.m. Lunch break on your own.

12:30 – 2:00 p.m. Poster Session. Light snacks available.

Marano Campus Center Arena

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Three Minute Thesis Competition and Reception

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition celebrates the exciting research conducted by graduate students at SUNY Oswego. This competition cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and communication skills. The

competition supports students’ capacity to effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience. All are welcome to attend and vote on the People’s Choice.

132 Marano Campus Center Auditorium

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. Spotlight Panel #4: Why Representation & Culturally Responsive Education Matters

114 Marano Campus Center

4:00 – 4:50 p.m. Spotlight Panel #5: Challenge Debate with SUNY Brockport

114 Marano Campus Center

Quest 2019 awards, ceremonies & featured events

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. Modern Languages Honor Societies Induction Ceremonies, 242 Marano Campus Center

10:00 – 11:50 a.m. Creative Writing Awards, 114 Marano Campus Center

Noon – 1:00 p.m. Display to Archives Luncheon, Penfield Library (Reservation Required)

2:00 – 3:50 p.m. Math+MSLC QuESTimathon, 174 Marano Campus Center (Tutoring Center)

2:00 – 3:50 p.m. Art and Design Showcase, Tyler Hall Lobby

Beginning 2:00, 2:25, 3:00 and 3:25 p.m. Planetarium Presentations, 223 Shineman Center Planetarium

3:00 – 4:30 p.m. Deans’ Writing Awards and Reception, Penfield Library

3:00 – 5:00 p.m. International and Global Reception, 205 Marano Campus Center

3:30 – 5:30 p.m. Beta Gamma Sigma Induction Ceremony and Reception, 221 Rich Hall

Sessions by time:

5:00 – 7 p.m. (April 2) Syracuse Campus

“Using Assistive Technology to Level the Playing Field” Amanda Fenlon

“Classification of Mental Disorders from Methylation Data” Christopher Bartlett, Isabelle Bichindaritz

“Using Assistive Technology and Powerful Teaching to Reach Common Core Standards in Reading and Writing for Students with Disabilities” Cortnie Purce, Carol Willard

“Educational Leadership: Issue Analysis” Emily Bielejec, Nicole Petranchuk

“Branding and Culture of Companies” Marie Aloi, Christopher Clappin, Tess Conley

“Using Assistive Technology to Level the Playing Field” Marisa-Marie Conslato

“Using Assistive Technology to Level the Playing Field” Megan Russell

“Artificial intelligence and machine learning for breast cancer research” Renaud Seigneuric, Isabelle Bichindaritz

“Student Resources Coordinator” Ryan Lynn

“Austin” Stefanie Corey

8:00 a.m.

Chemistry Presentations: Part I

8:00 – 8:50 a.m. • 175 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Chemistry

“Using Bio-Feedstock to Synthesize Compostable Plastics”

Kyler Anderson

“Development of a Photodegradable Polymer”

Angela Frampton

“Development of a Stimuli-Responsive Molecule for Initiation of a Polymer”

Emma Kuczkowski, Christopher Serrano

8:30 a.m.

Electrical and Computer Engineering: Part I

8:30 – 8:50 a.m. • 211 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Electrical and Computer Engineering

“Sun Tracking Solar Power System”

Aitor Celaya, Alex Chambers

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Opening Ceremony

8:30 – 8:50 a.m. • 202 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

All-day conference for the School of Business “Opening Ceremony”

9:00 a.m.

Spotlight Panel #1: Fresh Water For All Puerto Rico Alternative Break Initiative

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 132 Marano Campus Center (Auditorium)

Sponsor: Community Services

Members of the Puerto Rico Alternative Break Trip will discuss their Fresh Water For All initiative- How it began and its impact to the Naranjito community in Puerto Rico.

“Fresh Water For All - Puerto Rico Alternative Break Initiative- Winter 2019”

Kristen Bella, Mahalia Tiburcio, Michelle Uroza, Jayvana Perez, Micah Pasinski

Biological Sciences Part I: Bats, Gills and Bottlenose Dolphins

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 122 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Biological Sciences

“Bats and Apples: Bat Ecosystem Services in Apple Orchards in Central New York”

Tenaja Smith-Butler, Alexandria Capra

“Quantification of Apoptosis in E. complanata Gills in Response to PCB 105 Exposure”

Lauren Hardy

“Sociality in captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) as influenced by age and gender”

Samantha Synan

Business Part I: China’s High Speed Railway, Effects of “Block System” on Chinese Communities and Insurance Premiums

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 133 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“The Potential Impacts of “Block System” Policy Initiative on Chinese Communities”

Chaoliang Jing

“An Introduction to China’s High-speed Railway”

Qiang Wang

“The Effects of Hurricane Sandy on New York: Severe Weather and Insurance Premiums”

Lars Ohlsen, Kayla Biles, Bruno Rojas, Christian Elthorp

Chemistry Presentations: Part II

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 175 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Chemistry

“Development and Synthesis of Environmentally Friendly Poly(disulfide)s”

Jasmine Gomez

“Geometry Optimization and Electron Density Mapping of Picolinamide Derivatives”

Hector Gomez

“Synthesis of polychalcogenide compounds in different solvents”

Tienna Deroy

Communication Studies: Online Communication, Blogs, and Social Media

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 323 Marano Campus Center (Poucher)

Sponsor: Communication Studies

This study will examine a specific form of online communication to connect with students and faculty of various higher education institutions in a public relations outlook.

“Content Analysis of University Blogs”

Sarah Slater

“A Social Media Content Analysis on the Top Five Most Followed National Football League Teams”

Taylor Briceno

“Engaging Images: Measuring Student Organization Use of Instagram and Lessons Learned from Best Practices”

Anna Chichester, Kayla Adam, Sam Donnelly, Luzelena Cespedes, Kendall Padovani, Abigayle Shaw

Computer Science Session I

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 170 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Computer Science

“DataMea: An Email Productivity Dashboard”

Cedric Hansen, Doug Myrdek, Tyler Dominick, Andrew Vadnais

“SMARTron: A SCANtron Analyzer”

Digital Humanities: Lightning Talks

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 231 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: History

This is an interdisciplinary group of student presenters that are presenting their Digital Humanities research in a Lightning Talk format.

“Digital Humanities Student Research at Oswego”

Anthony Brienza, Doug Bachman, Abraham Bates, Brandon Grant, Kyle Langlitz, Jordan McCauley, Ethan Romano, Giordano Romano, Elizabeth Tzivas

Electrical and Computer Engineering: Part II

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 211 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Electrical and Computer Engineering

“Autonomous Unsupervised FPGA Deskewing Device for High-Speed Data Transfer”

Brian Emigholz, Joshua Willson, Tyler Johnson, Thomas Jackson

“Autonomous Guided Vehicles (AGV) Localization and Navigation System”

Chris Carey, Benjamin Stifter

HDV Capstone Experience

9:00 – 10:30 a.m. • 201 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Human Development

HDV faculty and students present on their experiences in the senior capstone classes of HDV 400 Applied Methods and the linked HDV 403 community internship placements. This includes sharing their individual project proposals and internship experiences, discussing the process of human service program development, and their course experiences. This will also be useful for HDV students to learn about the HDV major and the senior capstone classes.

Dorothy Shedlock, Laura Brown, Mamta Saxena, Echo Cutter, Kristina Dullen, Doug Woolever, Kelsey Finch, Jenna Standish

Modern Languages Honor Societies Induction Ceremonies

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 242 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Modern Languages and Literatures

Honor Society Induction Ceremonies for: Italian, French and Spanish

Susan Bertonneau, Patrick Schultz, Milton Loayza

Naming and Confronting the Myths and Contradictions of Employment: A Literary Critique

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 114 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: English and Creative Writing

Can a man be a nurse? How can a young retail employee claim her rights when she is working off the books? Members of the English honor society explore favorite works of poetry and fiction that have influenced their thinking, and show how the practice of literary critique empowers them to name and confront the myths and contradictions that surround the search for a meaningful career.

“Employment and Literary Critique”

Ashley Brunache, Angela Lee, Natasia Burgess, Jenna Uryevick

Physics: Part I

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 223 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Physics

As part of a class AST 405 project, we use the latest version of MESA/RSP to model a number of OGLE Large Magellanic Cloud Cepheid Variable Stars. We describe the code, its implementation on the Astrophysics cluster, the success/failure of our modelling and the astrophysical implications.

“Radiation Hydrodynamic Modelling of Cepheid Variable Stars”

Brett Meerdink, Nick Proietti, Samantha Carey, Ryan Mammone, Natalie Miller, Katherine Galey, Paul Felice,

Kari Henry, AJ Chalmers, Antonella Pelosi, Shashi Kanbur

Psychology Part I: Compliments, Gait and Social Motives

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 208 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Psychology

“Does compliment type influence cognitive performance and mood in women?”

Brighton Bernard, Gilian Tenbergen

“Gait as a Predictor of Sexual Violence Victimization”

Bryce Colvin, Gilian Tenbergen

“A Modular Perspective of Social Motives”

Grace Roessling

Seeing Through Their Eyes

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 210 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Curriculum and Instruction

In this talk, presenters will describe a collaborative conversation each engaged in as a part of a Personal Profile assignment for a preservice teacher education course. The purpose of the assignment is to learn more about the educational impact and day-to-day experiences of people identified as having a disability Selected visual representations of the lived experiences of the interviewees will be on display.

Deb Quick, Donna Dennihy, Olga Powers, Sara Pritchard-Mitchell

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Part IA

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 202 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“An Empirical Analysis of A Shares Included in the MSCI Index”

Mingxuan Guo

“Astronics - Innovative Technology and Collaborative Solutions”

Amy Alba, Ahmed Albajari, Dillon Nimako, Sean Paul Owen, Sami Rajput

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Part IB

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 206 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“Are Chinese College Students’ Online Shopping Behavior Impulsive? Based on the Analysis of Questionnaire”

Wenshuang Zhang

“Doing Business in the U.S. vs. China”

Steve Giannotta

Sociology Presentations: Transforming Social Institutions

9:00 – 9:50 a.m. • 225 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Sociology

“Exploring Quiverfull Digital Spaces”

Abigail Langer

“Psychological and Emotional Effects of Concussions”

Kaylee Packard

“Racial Economic Opportunity in the U.S.”

Akezia Archibald

“Resiliency after Domestic Abuse”

Kristen Bella

Theatre Department: Play Readings I

9:00 – 9:30 a.m. • 205 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Theatre

A reading of a new play, “Smaller This Year,” by Anastasia West and William Reymann.

“Smaller This Year: A Play Reading”

Anastasia West

9:30 a.m.

Theatre Department: Play Readings II

9:30 – 10:30 a.m. • 205 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Theatre

A reading of a new student-written play, “Make Me Proud,” based on Donne’s ‘Death Be Not Proud’. A reading

featuring Kayla Elfers and Anastasia West.

“Make Me Proud: A Play Reading”

Kayla Elfers

10:00 a.m.

Spotlight Panel #2: I, Too, Am Study Abroad (ITASA)

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 132 Marano Campus Center (Auditorium)

Sponsor: Office of International Education and Programs

The goal of the panel presentation is for students to express why they chose to go to Puerto Rico to assist, what they learned from the experience, and lastly help students in attendance identify their own skills that inspire them to participate in future service learning initiatives. We plan to have a group of five students to present who are from diverse ethnic backgrounds and fields of study.

“I, Too, Am Study Abroad (ITASA) panel presentation and picture display on SUNY and NY Stands with Puerto

Rico Service Learning”

Tim Braun, Lisa Glidden, Joanne O’Toole, Maggie Rivera, Kelsey Gillett

Biological Sciences: Part II: Mechanosensation, Mouse Zygotes, and Gecko Skull Shapes

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 122 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Biological Sciences

“Effects of Surface Modification on Dictyostelium Adhesion and Mechanosensation”

Allison Hearn

“Affordable, Open-Source Device Design for Electroporating Mouse Zygotes”

Ali Khan

“Ecomorphometric Analysis of Pygopodid Gecko Skull Shape”

George Gurgis

Business Part II: Logos and Productivity Fluctuation

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 133 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“How a Company’s Logo Positively or Negatively Effects the Company”

Hannah Leva

“Consumer Comments About Meat Anti-Consumption: The Case of Turkey”

Merve Yanar

“Productivity Fluctuation”

Samira Todd, Shannon Yearwood

“Warren Buffett’s Stock Picking Methodology”

Brian Abad, Mike Nevills

Chemistry Presentations: Part III

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 175 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Chemistry

“Dispersive Liquid Liquid Microextraction of Diphenhydramine and its Metabolites from Aqueous Solutions”

Sierra Andrews, Alexis Smith

“Developing Epigenetic Capabilities at SUNY Oswego”

Christina Li

“Race, Hair Cortisol, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in the Syracuse Lead Study Participants”

Laura Thacker

Communication Studies: A podcast

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 323 Marano Campus Center (Poucher)

Sponsor: Communication Studies

A podcast series a that explores this idea of the uncertainty of being successful through various interviews with people that are confident in having found success in their lives. The goal of this project is to guide students in their search for what being successful means to them.

“Ladders (and How to Climb Them)”

Ethan Magram

Computer Science Session II

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 170 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Computer Science

“Virtual Mindfulness: Using Virtual Reality to Induce a State of Mindfulness”

Anne Reynolds, Kristen Ray, Kushboo Panchal

“Building a cm-Precise Cyber-Physical Drone using Differential GPS”

James Spagnola, Bastian Tenbergen

“AirborneCPS: Implementing Autonomous Flight Manuevors to Avoid Collisions”

Andrew Driscoll, Bastian Tenbergen

Creative Writing Awards

10:00 – 11:50 AM • 114 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Creative Writing Program

The 51st annual Creative Writing Awards features readings by the winners of awards in fiction, poetry, nonfiction, screenwriting, and playwriting.

Curriculum and Instruction: An International Aspect (A multi-paper presentation by the Visiting Scholars in the Curriculum and Instruction Department)

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 210 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Curriculum and Instruction

“Analysis of Factors Affecting Chinese Learners’ Participation in Classroom”

Yuling Gao, Harrison Yang

“Design and Application of Flipped Classroom Model of Deep Learning Based on Second Language Acquisition Theory”

Yanmin Chen, Harrison Yang

“What Should Be Improved in Chinese EFL Teaching?”

Wilbur Ge, Harrison Yang

“Research on Dynamic Detection Model of Abnormal Learning Behavior in Online Learning”

He Yang, Harrison Yang

Electrical and Computer Engineering: Part III

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 211 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Electrical and Computer Engineering

“Programmable Guitar Pedal”

Gregory Abbass

“Amphibious Rover”

Nicholas Curinga, Ryan Wiszniewski, Nana Yeboah

Mapping Oswego Service Learning Project A

10:00– 10:50 a.m. • 225 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Sociology

Students will present their digital map creations from the Team Taught Mapping Oswego Digital Humanities Service learning Project.

MAT 401: Mathemagica

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 232 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Mathematics

In this session, mathematics majors engaging in mathematical independent studies and projects will discuss their work and share some insight into what kinds of math magic undergraduates can tackle!

“Fibonacci and Coin Tossing Probabilities”

Kendra Walker

“The Hidden Information in Infinite Series Arising from Graphs”

Juliann Geraci

New Directions in History: A Selection of 2018-2019 History Capstone Projects

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 231 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: History

“The Incorporation of Violence during the Rise of the Bolsheviks, 1917-1921”

Elias Cerussi

“Trying to Steer a New Course: Democracy and Reform under the Russian Provisional Government in 1917”

Connor Breese

“The Rhetoric of Yellow Fever in 19th century New Orleans”

Rose Small

“Talking to the Dead: 19th-century Spiritualism in the eastern United States”

Lauren Nevil

“Unexpected Connections and Defining Modernity: Exploring Three Eras of Japanese History”

Raymond Theiss

“Understanding the Ritual Practices of the Ancient Mayan Civilization through New Historical Methods”

Nicole Dempsey

Physics: Part II

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 223 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Physics

“Frequency Linearization Technique Using Fabry-Perot Interferometer”

Andres Inga, P. M. Rupsinghe

“The Future of Solar Technology: Inkjet Printed Quantum Dot Films”

Dylan Richmond

“Homemade External Cavity-Diode Laser (ECDL) for Spectroscopy Applications”

Gregory Abbass, Sachintha Herath, Lawrence Paice, P. M. Rupsinghe

Psychology Part II: Free Recall, Cell Phones, and Threat Bias

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 208 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Psychology

“Semantic structure in repeated instances of free recall”

Maxwell Mozes, Theo Rhodes

“The Effects of Cell Phone Presence and Motivation on Student Performance”

Peter Mancarella, Emily Bovier

“Association between resting state functional connectivity of the Bed Nucleus Stria Terminalis and attentional bias to threat”

Samantha Jenks, Chiang-shan R. Li, Sien Hu

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Part IIA

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 202 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“Abnormal Turnover in Executives: Scapegoats or to Blame?”

Haiyu Liu

“Is Political Expericence of CEOs a Driving Force of Innovation?-An Empirical Analysis of A Share Listed Companies in China from 2012 to 2017”

Xiaomin Liu

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Part IIB

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 206 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“Financial Literacy and Household Financial Asset Allocation: China Evidence”

Wenxin Ye

“Big Data and Ethics: How to Conduct Ethical Research”

Douglas Castro

Studying Abroad: GETGO Travel Grant Experiences Part I

10:00 – 10:50 a.m. • 242 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Modern Languages and Literatures

Students who have received a GETGO travel grant, will be discussing their experiences of studying abroad.

10:30 a.m.

Prevalence and knowledge of college students regarding sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait from a midatlantic university campus

10:30 – 10:50 a.m. • 201 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Health Promotion and Wellness

This is a quantitative research study that identifies a gap in the literature related to the education of sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait on college campuses. This study aimed to identify if sickle cell disease or sickle cell trait was prevalent on a MidAtlantic university campus and students knowledge related to the subject. Further analysis of the data has to lead to some future implications for research and opportunities for outreach on college campuses.

Astrid Guity

Theatre Department: Play Readings III

10:30 – 11:50 a.m. • 205 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Theatre

A staged reading of the play “Red” by John Logan, co-presented between the Theatre Department and the English and Creative Writing Department.

“Red: A Play Reading”

Toby Malone, Brad Korbesmeyer

11:00 a.m.

The Legacy of Dada and Music Performance

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 132 Marano Campus Center (Auditorium)

Sponsor: Art History & Music

“Hannah Höch’s Dada Legacy”

Alina Daly

“Collaborative Composition and Performance in Electronic Music”

Paul Leary, Nicky Radford, Zahra Bellucci

Biological Sciences Part III: Crickets, Moths and Painted Lady Butterflies

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 122 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Biological Sciences

“Conditioning and persistence of olfactory stimulated behavior in crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus)”

Melissa Orleman

“Plastic-eating 101 featuring the greater wax moth”

Joseph Rocco

“The Effects of Rap Music on the Development of Painted Lady Butterflies (Vanessa cardui)”

Abigail Allen

Chemistry Presentations: Part IV

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 175 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Chemistry

“The effect of phenolic compound concentrations in staghorn sumac seeds on the winter foraging behaviors of birds”

Hailey Russell

“Untangling Metabolic Cooperation: An Investigation into the metabolic profiles of Lactobacillus bacteria”

Andrew Sommer

“Crystallization of the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin (TMD1)”

Vanessa Wiltsie, Amarachukwu Ajoku

“Expression and Purification of Complement Proteins CFH and C2 for Use in Protein Interaction Studies”

Veronica Singh

Communication Studies: Mass Media and the Law

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 323 Marano Campus Center (Poucher)

Sponsor: Communication Studies

A panel of four recent Mass Media & the Law students will present their research on important topics shaping communication law in 2019.

“Current Issues in Media Law”

Selena Pappas, Cameron Slavin, Samantha Smolak, Brigette Wagner

Computer Science Session III

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 170 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Computer Science

“Barta: A Local Anonymous Posting App”

Shakhar Dasgupta

“Machine Learning the CIA Factbook”

Michael Anilonis

“tidewat.ch”

Landon Patmore

Discover Wellness: Find a Healthier You

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 201 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Health Promotion and Wellness

The researchers will take you through five stages of health programming, showcasing their transferable skills: needs assessment, data analysis, program planning, program implementation, and program evaluation. Researchers will begin by discussing their process of a health needs assessment from the planning stages to the implementation stages of faculty and staff at SUNY Oswego. Then researchers will discuss how they analyzed the needs assessment data, planned programs based on the findings, started the implementation process of these programs on campus and evaluated the effectiveness of the program.

Sara Meal, Christian Dejesus, Shannon Stone, Richard McCabe

Electrical and Computer Engineering: Part IV

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 211 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Electrical and Computer Engineering

“Smart Garden”

Samantha Carey, Zachary Gathmann, David Ng Lee

“A Steer-by-Wire System”

Shawn Woleslagle, Jesse Taylor

Mapping Oswego Service Learning Project B

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 225 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Sociology

Students will present their digital map creations from the Team Taught Mapping Oswego DIgital Humanities Service learning Project.

MAT 402: Mathemagica

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 232 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Mathematics

In this session, mathematics majors engaging in mathematical independent studies and projects will discuss their work and share some insight into what kinds of math magic undergraduates can tackle!

“Constructing the Heptadecagon”

Kyler Anderson

“Differential Topology”

Ryan Gelnett

Physics: Part III

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 223 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Physics

“Graphene Nanoribbons: Various Gold Terminated Edge Binding Sites and Applications”

Dylan Richmond

“Common Student Misconceptions in Physics Classes: Mechanics”

Kyle Bautista

Psychology Part III: Foraging Patterns, and Upsetting Events

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 208 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Psychology

“Effects of resource value on human foraging”

Joshua Hull, Benjamin Wilson, Theo Rhodes

“College Students’ Social Reactions to Upsetting Events: Links with Attachment Representations of Parents”

Kaela Otero-Lush, Lindsey Mercurio, Kaitlyn Lockwood, Matthew Dykas

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Part IIIA

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 202 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“Market Manipulation Forex Trading System”

Matthew Stone

“An Empirical Analysis on the Linkage of Shanghai, Hong Kong and US Stock Market Under the Background of Sino-US Trade War”

Junyu Wang

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Part IIIB

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 206 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“How to Survive from “Dangerous” Financial Market?”

Jing Wang

“Can Yuebao Monetary Fund Avoid Being the Next Paypal Monetary Fund?”

Yuhang Zhang

Studying Abroad: GETGO Travel Grant Experiences Part II

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 242 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Modern Languages and Literatures

Students who have received a GETGO travel grant, will be discussing their experiences of studying abroad.

SUNY CiTi (BOCES) Partnership Equals Success

11:00 – 11:50 a.m. • 210 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Curriculum and Instruction

What creates student success in an alternative environment? The Credit Accrual Recovery for Everyone (C.A.R.E.) is an alternative high school program located at SUNY Oswego. The C.A.R.E. Program partners with the School of Education and SUNY Pre-Service Teachers. Students who have not seen success in their home school are graduating with Regents Diplomas in the CARE Program with the support of program teachers, and college pre-service teachers. During this presentation CARE students and SUNY Pre-service teachers will share their experiences in the program and the benefits. The success is grounded in Relationships, Time, and Interdisciplinary Instruction and Learning.

Robyn Proud, Tammy Dilmore, Tommy Honors, Samantha Rose, Katherine Strieter, Matt Warren, Tila Neopaney

11:30 a.m.

Spotlight Panel #3: Creative Collaboration Between Lighting and Projection Media

11:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • 133 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Theatre

(Lighting Installation) A brief presentation combining audio, lighting, and media elements tethered using Open Sound Control and Midi Time Code.

“Creative Collaboration Between Lighting and Projection Media”

Patrick Mathis

Noon

Penfield Library Display to Archives Faculty & Staff Luncheon (Reservation Required)

Noon – 1:00 p.m. • Penfield Library Speaker’s Corner

Sponsor: Penfield Library

The annual Display to Archives luncheon recognizes the scholarly and creative efforts of all of SUNY Oswego’s faculty and professional staff, particularly highlighting the faculty and staff who donated their work to the College Archives in the past year. Pre-registration required.

Anthropology

Lindsay Bell

Alanna Ossa

Atmospheric and Geological Sciences

Scott Steiger

Dave Valentino

Biological Sciences

James MacKenzie

Peter Newell

Business

Mary Rodgers

Career and Technical Educator Preparation

Benjamin Ogwo

Chemistry

Kestutis Bendinskas

Fehmi Damkaci

Andrew Garner

James Pagano

Communication Studies

Kristen Eichhorn

Jason Zenor

Computer Science

Damian Schofield

Bastian Tenbergen

Counseling and Psychological Services

Jodi Ann Mullen

Criminal Justice

Roger Guy

Margaret Schmuhl

Curriculum and Instruction

Marcia Burrell

Sharon Kane

Ritu Radhakrishnan

Tania Ramalho

Namrata Sharma

Economics

Lyudmyla Sonchak

Educational Administration

Tamara Lipke

English and Creative Writing

Sarah Berry

Lewis Turco*

Health Promotion and Wellness

Sandy Bargainnier

Intercollegiate Athletics

Dan Witmer

Library

Juan Denzer

Laura Harris

Deale Hutton*

Mathematics

Christopher Baltus

Indu R. U. Churchill

Daniel Kraus

John Myers

Ampalavanar Nanthakumar

Modern Languages and Literatures

Gonzalo Aguiar

Beatriz Salcedo-Strumpf

Music

Todd Graber

Juan Francisco La Manna

Office of Learning Services

Steven Smith

Office of the Provost

Scott Furlong

Physics

Carolina Ilie

Shashi Kanbur

Political Science

Helen Knowles

Allison Rank

Psychology

Matthew Dykas

Sociology

Tim Delaney

Theatre

Aleksandra Kraszpulska

12:30 p.m.

Quest 2019 Poster Session

12:30 – 2:00 p.m. • Marano Campus Center Areana

1:30 p.m

Three Minute Thesis Competition and Reception

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. • 132 Marano Campus Center (Auditorium)

Sponsor: Division of Graduate Studies

A competition that celebrates the exciting research conducted by graduate students at SUNY Oswego. This competition cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and communication skills. The competition supports students’ capacity to effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a nonspecialist audience. Reception to follow, sponsored by Auxiliary Services.

2:00 p.m.

Art and Design Showcase

2:00 – 4:00 p.m. • Tyler Hall Lobby

Sponsor: Art

Display of student projects and creative research in studio art and graphic design.

Kim Grunden, Courtney Hall, Dalton Patterson, Julie Farquhar, Hannah Sojka, Bradley Holen, Zack Jocz, Jia Fu Liu, Pragya Pahari, Ian Suanders, Abhishek Thapa, Sarah Smelko, Ariana Dzibela, Shea McCarthy, Mikayla Trapasso, Nyiah Bagnall, Nathaniel Canfield, Maria Derenzo, Hannah Deutsch, Kassandra Edwards, Jacklyn Lopez, Paul Phipps, Jacob Sweeney, Christopher Weiman, Jessica Miller, Catalina Penailillo

Biological Sciences Part IV: Freshwater Mussels, Spotted Turtles and International Travel

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. • 122 Shineman Science Center

Sponsor: Biological Sciences

“Tanzania and Israel: New opportunities in faculty-led international travel for biology students”

Karen Sime

“Effects of Atrazine on Freshwater Mussels”

Manna Job

Communication Studies: Race and Gender in the Media

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. • 323 Marano Campus Center (Poucher)

Sponsor: Communication Studies

This panel will discuss the complex representations of race and gender in contemporary media. Each panelist will examine how media texts challenge but also reinforce traditional stereotypes of race and gender.

“Gender and Race in the Media”

Tahirah Abdo, Myles Carter, Josephine Morron, Rebecca Velez

Mapping Oswego Service Learning Project C

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. • 225 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Sociology

Students will present their digital map creations from the Team Taught Mapping Oswego Digital Humanities Service learning Project.

2:00 p.m.

Math+MSLC QuESTimathon

2:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 174 Marano Campus Center (Tutoring Center)

Sponsor: Mathematics

Rise to the challenge of estimating a target number; your team will have 10 chances in each round to succeed in capturing the target number in a range and then narrow that range to pin the target down. Over several rounds, your team will rack up points ... and you will rack up the skills for estimation!

Messy and Endangered Languages

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. • 208 Marano Campus Center

Sponsors: Anthropology & Linguistics Program

“Play Fun with Chinese Language - the glorious messiness of Chinese”

Yufang Rao

“Documenting an Endangered Language: Making the First Kiowa Dictionary”

Cory Becker-Warren, Autumn Schunk, Lillian Talmage, Ian White

Meteorology and Climatology

2:0 0– 2:50 p.m. • 114 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Atmospheric and Geological Sciences (Meteorology)

“Comparing Lightning in Light Precipitation, Classic, and Heavy Precipitation Supercells”

Emma Flower

“An Analysis on the Validity of Hiding in a Ditch to Survive an Approaching Tornado: A Wind Tunnel Model

Study”

Elizabeth Tirone

Physics: Part IV

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. • 223 Shineman Science Center (Planetarium)

Sponsor: Physics

“Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo Lunar Landings”

John Zielinski

“The Stars of Spring”

Paul Felice

Shanghai Normal University - SUNY Oswego International Academic Forum: Part IV

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. • 202 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Business

“Return to the Earth’s Original Color: A Comparative Study of Green Financial Policies of Chinese and American Commercial Banks and an Analysis of the Internal Causes of Their Implementation*”

Yujie Lei

“Does Financial Development Make Air Cleaner? Evidence from Panel Data of 276 Cities in China”

Ping Wang

Yes, We Can All Get Along: Debating Competing Political Positions

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. • 201 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Political Science

There are many political issues facing both the SUNY Oswego campus and the nation as a whole. In light of recent events, the Political Science Club believes that there should be a place on the SUNY Oswego campus where students can constructively and respectfully debate political topics, give their opinions, and invite members of the community to engage in discussion. We believe that the topics discussed in our meetings have importance beyond the walls of Mahar 467. This roundtable discussion, featuring representatives from the College Democrats, College Republicans, Young Americans For Freedom and The International Socialist Club represents an important way for groups, with differing political viewpoints, to come together and discuss pressing political issues in a controlled environment moderated by unbiased hosts from the Political Science Club. It will feature student-generated questions gathered by a survey sent to the campus, and additional relevant questions chosen to be asked at the discussion.

Connor Breese, Thomas Hardman, Bruno Rojas, Ericka Solomon, Emily Tepfenhart, Kevin Tirpak, Tyler Toomey

3:00 p.m.

Spotlight Panel #4: Why Representation & Culturally Responsive Education Matters

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 114 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: School of Education Teacher Opportunity Corps (TOC II)

The School of Education Teacher Opportunity Corps (TOC II) Scholars believes that representation matters in the 21st Century classroom, and more importantly that culturally responsive education matters today too. One important objective of becoming a teacher is being culturally and linguistically responsive, however, how do we prepare pre-service teachers to enter urban communities if they are not culturally mindful? How do we change the narrative, remove the single story and ensure cultural competence among educators in P-12 schools to make sure that all students reach their full potential? During this 50-minute session, TOC II scholars will share their personal stories on why they want to teach in urban schools, their perspective on what it means to be a culturally responsive educator, and how they believe TOC II and the School of Education is preparing them to be an effective educator for all.

“Why Representation & Culturally Responsive Education Matters: Voices from TOC II Scholars”

Tamara Dalton, Leilani Leslie, Anabelle Maldonado, Stacey Malone, Astrid Menjivar, Leeza Rooper, Alexa Simeon, Venise Valcarcel

Addressing Poverty Issues in Mental Health Counseling

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 210 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Counseling and Psychological Services

The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the importance of understanding poverty in counseling contexts and to address best practices in working with clients who experience poverty in rural and urban settings. Attendees will have an opportunity to engage in an experiential activity and discussion following the presentation.

Stacy Baum

Anthropology Capstone Presentations: Part I

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 132 Marano Campus Center (Auditorium)

Sponsor: Anthropology

“Bryan Baez Presentation”

Bryan Baez

“Can Skeletal Traits Identify Body Mass?”

Jessica Allen

“Conceptualization, Participation, and Maintenance of Consumerist Behavior and Economic Inequity in Oswego County”

Ryan Fitzgerald

“For What It’s Worth: A look at the commodity value opposed to the value of cultural patrimony”

Colton Fallon

“Student’s Perceptions Regarding Gun Control”

Hali Castrovinci

Communication Studies: Strategic Communication

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 323 Marano Campus Center (Poucher)

Sponsor: Communication Studies

This session features the work of graduate students in the Strategic Communication Master’s program. Topics range from a study of political beliefs to the effectiveness of advertising methods for a self-defense class at Oswego to a project about implementing diversity training on college campuses.

“Graduate Research and Applied Projects from the Strategic Communication Master’s Program”

Kurt Albrecht, Morgan Meaney, Amanda Ebrahim

Deans’ Writing Awards

3:00 – 4:50 p.m. • Penfield Classroom 215

Sponsor: English and Creative Writing

Michael Murphy

The Experiences of Korean Faculty Studying and Teaching in the US

3:00 – 5:00 p.m. • 205 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Eta Omicron Chapter of Phi Beta Delta

International and Global Reception to celebrate guests interested in discussing topics surrounding international issues that includes Year of Korea Panel Discussion. All are welcome. Light refreshments will be served. Sponsored by Phi Beta Delta and IGE. IST approved

Ahreum Lee, Seung Paek, Taejin Jung

Free Speech and Violence

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 208 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Philosophy & Criminal Justice

“Free Speech, Philosophy, and the Law”

Robert Jackowski, Megan Mullen

“Systemic Analysis of Violence Against Women in India”

Sonali Kumar

Mapping Oswego Service Learning Project D

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 225 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Sociology

Students from the team taught services project, will be presenting their digital maps of Oswego.

Physics: Part V

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 223 Shineman Science Center (Planetarium)

Sponsor: Physics

“Step into the Shoes of the Apollo 15 Astronauts: Using the Planetarium and/or Virtual Reality to Experience Lunar Missions Firsthand with the help of Open-Source 3D Modeling Software”

Richard Frieman

“The First 5 Years of the New Planetarium”

Scott Roby

Theatre Department: Presentations I

3:00 – 3:50 p.m. • 201 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Theatre

“The Dramaturgy Hub Initiative”

Toby Malone

“‘The Shape of Things’ Dramaturgy Hub”

Ryan Benson Smith

3:30 p.m.

Beta Gamma Sigma Induction Ceremony

3:30 – 5:30 p.m. • 221 Rich Hall

Sponsor: School of Business

Beta Gamma Sigma Induction Ceremony with Chapter Honoree, Jeff Sorensen ’92

4:00 p.m.

Spotlight Panel #5: Challenge Debate with SUNY Brockport

4:00 – 4:50 p.m. • 114 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Communication Studies

Parliamentary style debate involving 4 person teams from SUNY Oswego and SUNY Brockport formally arguing a topic of current controversy on college campuses.

“Challenge Debate with SUNY Brockport”

Ethan Magram, Jacob Starowicz, William Corsi, Justique Carter, Jacob Manrow

Anthropology Capstone Presentations: Part II

4:00 – 4:50 p.m. • 132 Marano Campus Center (Auditorium)

Sponsor: Anthropology

“Domestication of Cats”

Elaina Kline

“The Environmental Effects from Body Farms”

Medgine Mede

“The Intersectionality of New York City Health Campaigns and At-risk Populations”

Rose Small

“The Utility of Serrated versus Non-serrated Points of the Hohokam”

Ralph Schloss

Mapping Oswego Service Learning Project E

4:00 – 4:50 p.m. • 225 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Sociology

Students from the team taught services project, will be presenting their digital maps of Oswego.

Theatre Department: Presentations II

4:00 – 4:50 p.m. • 201 Marano Campus Center

Sponsor: Theatre

“The Good Dramaturg: ‘The Good Doctor’ Through the Eyes of a Dramaturg”

Kiersten Mickle

“Effects of the Internet on Cruising Culture in Homosexual Men”

Ryan Benson Smith

Quest 2019 poster session

12:30 – 2 p.m. • Marano Campus Center Arena

Atmospheric and Geological Sciences — Geology

1. “Migration of the Taconic deformation front across the mid-Atlantic Piedmont: evidence from detailed porphyroblast analysis”

Christopher Weiman

2. “Detailed analysis of lacustrine sedimentary rocks from the Mesozoic Newark Basin, NY and NJ”

Claudia Halbauer

3. “Subsurface Profiling using Electromagnetic Induction”

Evan Rafferty

4. “Monitoring subsurface water flow through an earthen dam using electrical resistivity, Rice Creek Field Station, Oswego, New York”

Ralph Schloss, Alison Sullivan, Benjamin Walley, Nicholas Kanauer, Michael Kensell, Becky Nesel, Caitlin Serowik, Mary Sorensen, Christopher Weiman

5. “It’s All Your Fault, Mr. Clarendon-Linden”

Kevin Frier

6. “Stratigraphic and structural analysis of the West Settlement valley stream”

Kyle Faraci

7. “Origin and development of the Devil’s Bedstead pyroxenite within the Pioneer Mountains metamorphic core complex, central Idaho”

Leah Knapp, Rachel Lee, Brian Hough

8. “Grain Size Analysis of Sediment Core Samples from Searles Lake, California: Steps Toward Interpreting Lake Expansion and Contraction in the Desert Southwest”

Mary Sorensen, Becky Nesel, Justin Stroup

9. “Establishing A Grainsize Sample Processing Method: Isolating Clastic Grains and Removing Evaporite Minerals to Enable Paleo-environmental Interpretations”

Mary Sorensen, Becky Nesel, Justin Stroup

10. “Magnetic anomaly and susceptibility analysis of ore bodies in the western Hudson Highlands, New York”

Michael Kensell, Caitlin Serowik

11. “Can drone imagery be used to produce 3D models for erosion analysis?: An experiment at McIntyre’s Bluff, Sterling, NY”

Natalie Torres, Rachel Lee, Richard Frieman, Brian Hough

12. “Petrology of the Inwood marble, New York City”

Tristan Dietschler

13. “Petrographic Analysis of Payne Lake granite contact zone, Jefferson County, New York”

Tyler Petty

14. “In Memory of Brian Hough”

Biological Sciences

15. “Development of Genetic Tools for Targeted Gene Modification in Acetobacter Bacteria”

Chris Murphy

16. “Molecular Cloning of Truncated Filamin Constructs Lacking Key Regulatory Domains”

Colin Harrington

17. “Anatomical mechanisms for leaf prostration of the wintergreen fern Polystichum acrostichoides”

Dimitri Lockhart

18. “Molecular Cloning of RFP-tagged Rap1 for the Study of the Genetic Interaction between Rap1 and KrsB”

Gigi Niu

19. “Effects of Temperature and Day length on the Daily Movements and Home Range of the Southern Flying Squirrel”

Kervans Lerouge

20. “Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata) Population Analysis and Headstarting Efficiency at Ira Marsh in Cayuga County, NY”

Matthew Gorman, Kasey Barber, Kaitlyn Talmage

21. “Influence of Yeasts and Bacteria on the Rate of Larval Development in Drosophila melanogaster”

Rita Ntim-Gyakari, Tylea McCarthy-Walker

22. “Effects of Environmental Modifications on Dictyostelium Adhesion and Mechanosensation”

Sara Fuller

23. “The Role of alpha-Actinin in Sensing Mechanical Stimulation in Dictyostelium Cells”

Stephanie Arcello

Chemistry

24. “SUNY Oswego Agricultural Testing and Analysis Laboratories: What is important to know about Grains!”

Charlotte Labrie-Cleary, Hanna Greulich

25. “Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Amino Acids in latent fingerprints”

Joonwoo Park

26. “Interactions Between Thrombomodulin and The Complement System by Surface Plasmon Resonance”

Jose Giler

27. “Expression and Purification of Complement Component 2”

Lainey Archibee

28. “Interactions Between Thrombomodulin and The Complement System by SPR and HDMXS”

MaryCatherine Rice

29. “Optimizing Complement Factor H Expression in Yeast”

Matthew Gehm, Lorenzo D’Amore

30. “Wort Composition In Malted Grains”

Noah Davidson, David Eckler

31. “Structure and function studies of 3DL1, an enzyme of unknown function”

Richard DeMaddis

Community Services

32. “The Mosquito and It’s Effects in Puerto Rico After Hurricane Maria and Irma”

Kayla Brun, Micah Pasinski

Computer Science

33. “Women in Computing Publicity”

Alikeju Adejo

34. “A Road Vehicle Image Analyzer”

Ayomide Gbadamosi

35. “Machine Learning Based Classification of Mental Disorders from Methylation Data”

Christopher Bartlett

36. “Augmented Reality Infrared Overlay”

Gage Davidson

37. “Getting Your Hands Dirty: Innovations & Obstacles with Project-Based STEAM Instruction”

Hannah O’Brian

38. “Girls Who Code”

Ka Ying Chan

39. “Swiipe - A mobile marketplace application”

Randy Nguyen

40. “QRMD - A QR Code Medical Data App for Emergency Crews”

Robert Kilmer

41. “Building a cm-Precise Cyber-Physical Drone using Differential GPS”

James Spagnola, Bastian Tenbergen

42. “Making a Text-Based RPG Simulation in C++”

Tonia Sanzo

Counseling and Psychological Services

43. “Using Psychoeducational Test Data to Identify Feigned Effort”

Nicole Maether, Raychel Kramer, Laura Spenceley

Health Promotion and Wellness

44. “Evaluation of “Cold Ones and Hard Stuff” A Public Health Program”

Emily Emmons, Victoria Idowu

Human Development

45. “Behavioral And Emotional Interventions For Preschool Children Behavioral And Emotional Interventions For Preschool Children”

Michelle Uroza, Mamta Saxena

Psychology

46. “Effects of resource value on human foraging”

Benjamin Wilson, Joshua Hull, Theo Rhodes

47. “Effect of bias on strategy decisions in the Monty Hall Dilemma”

Briann Wood, Theo Rhodes

48. “The Effects Of PTSD And Gender On Alcohol Dependence”

Dakota Trejo, Samara Rice

49. “Perception of argument under violations of film continuity”

Hannah Gonzalez, Theo Rhodes

50. “Effect of Laterality on Motor Switching and Inhibition”

Joseph Goliber, Manna Job, Samantha Jenks, Sien Hu

51. “Challenges and Pathways in Child Sexual Abuse Secondary Prevention: Do Experts Believe It Will Work?”

Kassidy Pratt, Gilian Tenbergen

52. “Temporal patterns of visual attention during working memory task in pre-adolescent children”

Leigh Bacher, Alex Rivera, Gabi DeAngleo, Skyler Stisser

53. “Challenges and Pathways in Child Sexual Abuse Secondary Prevention: Qualitative Analysis of Expert Opinions”

Lynnell Cote, Gilian Tenbergen

54. “The Effects of Age on Proactive Control in Healthy Adults”

Manna Job, Samantha Jenks

55. “The Effects of Age on Proactive Control in Healthy Adults”

Manna Job, Samantha Jenks, Chiang-shan R. Li, Sien Hu

56. “Viewing demographic characteristics and outcomes on selfassessed questionnaires through the use of MANOVA statistical testing”

Maria Isidoro-Chino, Samara Rice

57. “Analyzing Parental Knowledge of Child Sexual Development”

Rachel Meyer, Gilian Tenbergen

58. “Picking up the pieces: Search behavior and hand-eye coordination in puzzle tasks”

Seth Chiasson, Theo Rhodes

59. “Correlates of Mindfulness and Alcohol Craving Six Months after Alcohol Treatment”

Travis Cowart, Samara Rice

60. “Applying Fitts’ law to a self-organized limbs function generalized by experience”

Wesley Xu, Theo Rhodes

Abstract Archive

"Title: A Social Media Content Analysis on the Top Five Most Followed National Football League Teams

Abstract: With a content analysis on the five most followed NFL social media accounts, there will be a significant finding on what techniques are being utilized by these teams and we may be able to determine if they all handle social media in a similar manner or a much more unique style.

Author(s): Taylor Briceno"

"Title: Semantic structure in repeated instances of free recall

Abstract: When prompted to recall items in a category humans recall these items in spontaneous bursts. While the retrieval rate of these items decreases over time this clustering pattern appears to be pervasive, this could point to the underlying structure of human memory storage and retrieval.  In order to test this clustering behavior, participants were prompted to recall items from the same semantic category (animals) as well as the same verbal pattern (words beginning with “s”) several times over the course of a few weeks. Repetition of these recall tasks gives us valuable insight into how these clusters may be formed on both the individual and more general cognitive levels.  We argue that variability in these results are primarily due to the individual  and likely their experiences rather than a clustering mechanism inherent in the language itself.  This suggests theories for search of memory must include individualized processes instead of relying solely on structure inherent in language itself.

Author(s): Maxwell Mozes, Theo Rhodes"

"Title: SUNY CiTi  (BOCES) Partnership Equals Success

Abstract: What creates student success in an alternative environment?  

The Credit Accrual Recovery for Everyone (C.A.R.E.) is an alternative high school program located at SUNY Oswego. The C.A.R.E. Program partners with the School of Education and  SUNY Pre-Service Teachers. Students who have not seen success in their home school are graduating with Regents Diplomas in the CARE Program with the support of program teachers, and college pre-service teachers. During this presentation CARE students and SUNY Pre-service teachers will share their experiences in the program and the benefits. The success is grounded in Relationships,Time, and Interdisciplinary Instruction and Learning.

Author(s): CARE TEAM:  Robyn Proud, Tammy Dilmore, Tommy Honors, Samantha Rose, Katherine Strieter, Matt Warren, Tila Neopaney; SUNY Oswego Pre-Service Teachers;  CARE Students"

"Title: Picking up the pieces: Search behavior and hand-eye coordination in puzzle tasks

Abstract: We used jigsaw puzzle and a lego construction task to further understand visual and related cognitive search behaviors.  In both of these tasks, participants engage in a variety of search behaviors with different properties and constraints.  For example, in the lego construction task, step by step instructions are provided, wheres in a jigsaw puzzle, the structure must be intuited from a picture of the final product. We used a head-mounted eye-tracker to collect data on gaze location, trajectory, and fixations, which functions by using cameras to record participant pupils and follow their movements throughout the tasks. We hypothesized that pupil fixation hotspots and pupil trajectory act as a predictor for hand movements during foraging behavior, with dynamical coupling reflective of the task constraints and structure.

Author(s): Seth Chiasson, Theo Rhodes"

"Title: Effects of resource value on human foraging

Abstract: We analyzed the foraging patterns of human participants using Quick Response (QR) codes, situated primarily on walls or railings of the interior of a school’s administrative building. The task was to locate as many QR codes as possible within a set timeframe. Progress and performance was tracked through the use of mobile devices using a QR scanning application. Two groups were used, one with codes that had equal resource values. The second group had altered values, with fifteen visually distinctive QR codes changed to have substantially higher value. This research was designed to further knowledge on human search behavior in the real world, and to determine if search patterns change when the value of resources change.We hypothesize that human foraging will exhibit Lévy flights, where short movements in random directions are connected by much rarer, but much larger movements. Lévy flights may increase search effectiveness, and the dynamics of such patterns may be altered by differences in resource distributions and values.

Author(s): Benjamin Wilson, Joshua Hull, Theo Rhodes"

"Title: Effects of resource value on human foraging

Abstract: We analyzed the foraging patterns of human participants using Quick Response (QR) codes, situated primarily on walls or railings of the interior of a school’s administrative building. The task was to locate as many QR codes as possible within a set timeframe. Progress and performance was tracked through the use of mobile devices using a QR scanning application. Two groups were used, one with codes that had equal resource values. The second group had altered values, with fifteen visually distinctive QR codes changed to have substantially higher value. This research was designed to further knowledge on human search behavior in the real world, and to determine if search patterns change when the value of resources change. We hypothesize that human foraging will exhibit Lévy flights, where short movements in random directions are connected by much rarer, but much larger movements. Lévy flights may increase search effectiveness, and the dynamics of such patterns may be altered by differences in resource distributions and values.

Author(s): Joshua Hull, Benjamin Wilson, Theo Rhodes"

"Title: Analyzing Parental Knowledge of Child Sexual Development

Abstract: Various studies have shown the importance of parental involvement during a child’s early development (Englund et. al,, 2004; Senechal & LeFevre, 2002). Along with public education, parental knowledge and home education have proven to be important factors in child development (Benasich & Brooks-Gunn, 2017; Dichtelmiller et. al, 1992). When a child is exposed to sexual abuse, many problematic behaviors can arise, leading to difficulties in emotional and social development (Friedrich, 1986; Burton et. al., 1997). Studies have indicated that a strengthened parent-child relationship can allow for easier communication about sexual matters (Potter et. al., 2012; Freeman, 1982). However, in order for this communication to be effective, parents should be knowledgeable about sexual development and sexual abuse. Although many parents believe that they educate their children about the dangers of sexual assault, the common conversation about “stranger danger” does not include the possibility of assault by an individual that the child knows (Deblinger et. al., 2010). Many parents believe that children should not be exposed to sexual education at a young age, as they fear that early exposure will cause abnormal sexual behaviors or trauma. However, study results from Wurtele (1990) show that when separating four-year-old children into a safety skills training program, there was not only an increase in knowledge of sexual assault and safety skills, but also no reported problematic behaviors or increase in the level of fear towards others. This study rejects previous notions of parents that safety programs cannot be implemented without harming the socially and developmentally. Although there is extensive research on the issue of sexual assault, there is very little data about parental knowledge of child sexual development. This study was designed to quantify parental knowledge about sexual development. Research was carried out at the Child Advocacy Center in Fulton, NY, where surveys were distributed to parents undergoing therapy or with a child in therapy. All participants were parents of children who had been exposed to some sort of physical or sexual abuse. To design the survey, a categorization of normative sexual behaviors were extracted from Sexualized Children,

(Gil & Johnson, 1993). Participants were asked to categorize sexual developmental behaviors into three different age groups: 0-4, 5-7, and 8-11. Participants were then asked to answer demographic questions such as age, income, marital status, and therapy placement. In addition, a few questions were asked about personal and child history of abuse in the household of the parent. This exploratory study was used to obtain baseline data on parental knowledge of child sexual development. Preliminary results from baseline (Wave 1) data collection suggest that parents have difficulty understanding the difference between age-appropriate sexual behaviors and age-inappropriate sexual behaviors during adolescence. Difficulty categorizing the age of each developmental action have been observed as well. Research is anticipated to strengthen preexisting research on abuse prevention, promoting parental education of sexual development in order to better identify sexual abuse. Data collection for Wave 2 (post-treatment) is currently ongoing.

Author(s): Rachel Meyer, Gilian Tenbergen"

"Title: The Mosquito and It's Effects in Puerto Rico After Hurricane Maria and Irma

Abstract: Torrential rains and floods from Hurricane Maria and Irma left pools of still and contaminated water in Puerto Rico. Students will present the cycle of the mosquito, the effects on the PR community and how PR Science Trust is working to help control the mosquito and educate the community to protect from mosquito-borne diseases.

Author(s): Kayla Brun, Micah Pasinski"

"Title: Amphibious Rover

Abstract: To reduce human exposure to potentially hazardous environments and materials, the project develops a remote-controlled amphibious rover which is able to control the rover on both land and water and collect samples/objects using an attached claw.

Author(s): Nicholas Curinga, Ryan Wiszniewski, and Nana Yeboah

Faculty Advisor: Mustafa Ayad"

"Title: Curriculum and Instrument: An International Aspect

Abstract: Title: Analysis of Factors Affecting Chinese Learners' Participation in Classroom

Presenters: Dr. Yuling Gao, Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor at Central China Normal University, China

Abstract: Participation is an important manifestation of the learner's subjectivity in the learning process. In addition to China's unique culture, the safety of the learning environment, the effectiveness of learning support, and the diversity of learning media can have a significant impact on learner participation. Through the analysis of traditional classrooms, this paper proposes suggestions to enhance students' enthusiasm for participation.

Title: Design and Application of Flipped Classroom Model of Deep Learning Based on Second Language Acquisition Theory

Presenter: Dr. Yanmin Chen, Visiting Scholar and Assistant Professor at Central China Normal University, China

Abstract: This presentation will show the result of survey of relationship between second language acquisition and deep learning. Based on the input, feedback and output principles of second language acquisition, it designs a flipped classroom model of deep learning based on second language acquisition theory.

Title:  What Should Be Improved in Chinese EFL Teaching?

Presenter: Dr. Wilbur Ge, Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor at National University of Defense Technology, China

Abstract: When going abroad, Chinese EFL learners might found that their English is not good enough to live and study in English-speaking countries. This presentation will share the results of a survey which is to figure out the English deficiencies perceived by some Chinese EFL learners who are currently studying abroad. Some suggestions will be proposed on how to improve Chinese EFL teaching based on the survey results and the presenter’s own experience. 

Title: Research on Dynamic Detection Model of Abnormal Learning Behavior in Online Learning

Presenter: Dr. He Yang, Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor at Hubei University of Education, China

Abstract: Online learning is becoming more popular. Not the same as face-to-face classes, learner’s abnormally learning behavior can’t be observed by teachers in time. In addition, online learning behavior is individual. In order to detect online learner’s abnormally behavior adaptively, we tried to design a detection model.

Author(s): Dr. Harrison Yang, Dr. Yuling Gao, Dr. Yanmin Chen, Dr. Wilbur Ge, Dr. He Yang"

"Title: Interactions Between Thrombomodulin and The Complement System by SPR and HDMXS

Abstract: Thrombomodulin (TM) is a vascular endothelial membrane protein that contains a specific N-terminal lectin-like domain (TMD1). This domain has been elucidated as a possible regulator of the complement system, specifically complement component 3 (C3). C3 is at the junction of three different complement activation pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative). Its activation is crucial for the innate immune response that responds to and subsequently eliminates pathogens. It is possible that TMD1 interacts with C3 or C3b for regulation of this innate immunity. Through the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS), the interactions between TMD1 with C3 or C3b can be explored. C3 binds to a surface coated with TMD1 based on previous SPR studies, with full kinetic studies underway. Using HDXMS we have seen that TMD1 interacts with C3b, and has a lesser interaction with C3. In deuterium exchange, TMD1 makes C3b more accessible, but C3 is less accessible in the presence of TMD1. These differences in accessibility support the idea that TMD1 may be a key step along the complement pathway. From these conclusions, we will next be investigating the role of complement factor H (CFH), a C3 regulator associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and its role in these interactions.

Author(s): MaryCatherine Rice"

"Title: The Effects Of PTSD And Gender On Alcohol Dependence

Abstract: This was an archival study that used data from the Project Aware Data Set, where all participants had problems with alcohol. For this project, we used a median split at score 31 to place participants in either the low or high PTSD groups, as measured by the PTSD Checklist (civilian version), and predicted that those who experience higher levels of PTSD will experience

increased dependence on alcohol. The reasoning behind this is that those who suffer from mental illnesses may be more likely to self-medicate in order to alleviate their symptoms. Out of curiosity, we also looked to see if there would be an effect of PTSD on alcohol dependence depending on gender. A Two-Way ANOVA was conducted to compare the main effects of PTSD and the interaction effect between genders on alcohol dependence. The main effect yielded an F ratio of F(1, 103)=20.78, p<.001, indicating a significant difference in alcohol dependence symptoms between those with higher levels of PTSD (M=43.81, SD=7.17) and those with lower levels of PTSD (M=37.99, SD=5.33). The main effect for gender yielded an F ratio of F(1,103)=.011, p>.05, indicating that the effect of gender was not significant, male (M=40.49, SD=6.11) and female (M=41.82, SD=7.92). The interaction effect was nonsignificant, F(1,103)=.322, p>.05. The effect of higher levels of PTSD on alcohol dependence was shown significant, however we can’t be certain on whether participants’ alcoholic problems came

before or after having symptoms of PTSD so we cannot confirm the reasoning that these participants are self-medicating to alleviate their symptoms. There are other theories that may describe these results which are that if they developed alcohol problems before they may have been more prone to experiencing traumatic events and more susceptible to developing PTSD

symptoms. As for different genders, it shows that there is no difference between male and female on alcohol dependence which makes sense, but it is always important to look for gender differences because they sometimes process and respond to situations differently.

Author(s): Dakota Trejo, Samara Rice"

"Title: Content Analysis of University Blogs

Abstract: This study will examine a specific form of online communication to connect with students and faculty of various higher education institutions in a public relations outlook.

Author(s): Sarah Slater"

"Title: Association between resting state functional connectivity of the Bed Nucleus Stria Terminalis and attentional bias to threat

Abstract: This study investigated the resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the Bed Nucleus Stria Terminalis (BNST) in healthy adults and patients with anxiety disorders performing a Dot-Probe task. Resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data and behavioral data were obtained from the Nathan Kline Institute (NKI) - Rockland Sample. Forty-nine healthy

adults and 20 patients diagnosed with various anxiety disorders from the ICD-9 were included. In the Dot-Probe task, two faces appeared on each side of the screen. One of the faces was neutral in emotion, and the other one was either threatening or happy. After the faces were presented, a single dot appeared on either side replacing a face. Participants were instructed to

press a button corresponding to the location of the dot. Attentional bias to threat was computed as the difference between the reaction time (RT) to the dot replacing neutral faces and that replacing threatening faces. A positive threat bias indicates faster response to threatening faces. Previous research has indicated a stronger threat bias in people with anxiety disorders. Given that the BNST is highly involved in emotional regulation in patients with anxiety disorders, we expected increased rsFC of BNST to threat bias in the patient group. We performed a correlation between the rsFC of BNST and threat bias in each group. Threat bias was negatively correlated with the rsFC of BNST to the anterior cingulate cortex in healthy adults. On the other hand, threat bias was positively correlated with rsFC of BNST to the vmPFC and caudate in patients. These results suggested distinct intrinsic neural connectivities in healthy and patients with anxiety disorders in response to negative emotion.

Author(s): Samantha Jenks, Chiang-shan R. Li, Sien Hu"

"Title: Graduate Research and Applied Projects from the Strategic Communication Master’s Program

Abstract: This session features the work of graduate students in the Strategic Communication Master’s program. Topics range from a study of political beliefs to the effectiveness of advertising methods for a self-defense class at Oswego to a project about implementing diversity training on college campuses.

Author(s): Kurt Albrecht, Morgan Meaney, Amanda Ebrahim"

"Title: Evaluation of "Cold Ones and Hard Stuff" A Public Health Program

Abstract: This project is the product of the semester-long complete evaluation plan on the public health program, “Cold Ones and Hard Stuff” completed in HSC 488 at SUNY Oswego with Professor Harris. This evaluation was done in collaboration with an HSC 448 Program Planning group that served as stakeholders. Evaluations were drawn on real data and other information gathered in the needs assessment and planning process. This presentation includes the results and interpretation of the data analyses, as well as a description of the evaluation process.

Author(s): Emily Emmons

Victoria Idowu"

"Title: Autonomous Guided Vehicles (AGV) Localization and Navigation System

Abstract: This presentation will explain how the system works, and what steps have been taken / will be taken to complete it.  What the localization method is and how the robot can sense objects in its way will also be discussed.

Author(s): Chris Carey, and Benjamin Stifter

Faculty Advisor: Mustafa Ayad"

"Title: College Students' Social Reactions to Upsetting Events: Links with Attachment Representations of Parents

Abstract: This pilot study explored how college students react socially to upsetting events and how these reactions are linked to their underlying attachment representations of parents. Participants completed survey measures assessing their perceptions of their parents' past abilities to be available, responsive, and sensitive secure bases. Participants then nominated a friend who could comment on their social behavior. This friend was later contacted and asked to report on how participants have reacted during personally upsetting times compared to other peers they have known. Results indicated that participants' representations of their mothers and their fathers were linked to differential response patterns of distress. More positive representations of mother were linked to more minimizing-like social behavior while upset (e..g, participants with more positive representations of mother have shown more "get away from me" or "keep to myself" behaviors than other people, as reported by their friends), while more positive representations of fathers were linked to less minimizing-like social behavior while upset. Results are discussed in terms of attachment theory and the different roles relationships with mothers and fathers play during development.

Author(s): Kaela Otero-Lush, Lindsey Mercurio, Kaitlyn Lockwood, Matthew Dykas"

"Title: Gender and Race in the Media

Abstract: This panel will discuss the complex representations of race and gender in contemporary media. Each panelist will examine how media texts challenge but also reinforce traditional stereotypes of race and gender.

Author(s): Tahirah Abdo, Myles Carter, Josephine Morron, Rebecca Velez"

"Title: Sociology Presentations: Transforming Social Institutions

Abstract: This panel seeks to explore the ways social institutions shape our shared “reality” of the world and our place in it. Each panelist will be exploring the role of power in various social institutions including (but not limited to) media, medical, family and economic institutions, while understanding that there is always opposition to institutions of power. Furthermore, the panelists recognize that oppositional collective action has the potential to create new discourses and theories; and dissent from below produces opportunities to rethink social institutions, social conditions and produces new conditions of possibility.

Author(s): Akezia Archibald, Kristen Bella, Kaylee Packard, Abigail Langer,"

"Title: Digital Humanities Student Research at Oswego

Abstract: This is an interdisciplinary group of student presenters that are presenting their Digital Humanities research in a Lightning Talk format.

Author(s): Anthony Brienza, Doug Bachman, Abraham Bates, Brandon Grant, Kyle Langlitz, Jordan McCauley, Ethan Romano, Giordano Romano, Elizabeth Tzivas"

"Title: Prevalence and knowledge of college students regarding sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait from a midatlantic university campus

Abstract: This is a quantitative research study that identifies a gap in the literature related to the education of sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait on college campuses. This study aimed to identify if sickle cell disease or sickle cell trait was prevalent on a MidAtlantic university campus and students knowledge related to the subject. Further analysis of the data has to lead to some future implications for research and opportunities for outreach on college campuses.

Author(s): Astrid Guity"

"Title: Effect of Laterality on Motor Switching and Inhibition

Abstract: This experiment investigated the effect of laterality (left or right-handedness) on motor switching and inhibition. Twenty-seven college students participated in our study. Handedness was measured by the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory where participants indicated how likely they were to use either hand to complete a task. A negative score indicates a tendency of being left-handed, and a positive score indicates a tendency of being right-handed. The absolute value of the score indicates the strength of the tendency. Participants then performed a finger switching task where a frequent “circle” desired a key press from the right index finger, and an occasional “cross” following the “circle” required a key press from the right middle finger.

Accuracy and reaction time (RT) to the “circle” and “cross” were recorded. When encountered by the “cross”, participants needed to inhibit the habitual response of the index finger and switch to use the middle finger; hence the RT to the “cross” consisted of the times for motor inhibition and execution. Previous research on laterality showed that right-handed people are

more efficient at inhibitory control in the left hemisphere, their dominant hemisphere that controls the right hands. We hence expected shorter RT to the “cross” in right-handed as compared to left-handed people. Consistent with our hypothesis, the results showed no significant correlation between laterality and RT to the “circle”, but a significant and negative correlation between laterality and RT to the “cross”. While the former result suggests that left- and right-handed people were not different in motor execution, the latter suggests that left- handed participants spent more time inhibiting a habitual motor response. Our results therefore coincide with previous research on handedness and motor inhibition.

Author(s): Joseph Goliber, Manna Job, Samantha Jenks, Sien Hu"

"Title: Yes, We Can All Get Along: Debating Competing Political Positions

Abstract: There are many political issues facing both the SUNY Oswego campus and the nation as a whole. In light of recent

events, the Political Science Club believes that there should be a place on the SUNY Oswego campus where students can constructively and respectfully debate political topics, give their opinions, and invite members of the community to engage in discussion. We believe that the topics discussed in our meetings have importance beyond the walls of Mahar 467. This roundtable discussion, featuring representatives from the College Democrats, College Republicans, Young Americans For Freedom and The International Socialist Club represents an important way for groups, with differing political viewpoints, to come together and discuss pressing political issues in a controlled environment moderated by unbiased hosts from the Political Science Club. It will feature student-generated questions gathered by a survey sent to the campus, and additional relevant

questions chosen to be asked at the discussion.

Author(s): Connor Breese, Thomas Hardman, Bruno Rojas, Ericka Solomon, Emily Tepfenhart, Kevin Tirpak, Tyler Toomey"

"Title: Stratigraphic and structural analysis of the West Settlement valley stream

Abstract: The West Settlement valley stream is located in Roxbury, NY in the Catskill Mountains. Stratigraphic and structural data was collected along the stream, noting the orientation, dip, using a geologic compass and layers present along the banks of the stream were also noted. From this data collected, a structural geologic map was created. The methods were collection of structural data using a geologic compass, creation of sterograms and rose diagrams using the program Seteronet, and the map was created with Google Earth and ArcGIS.  The objective of this field analysis is to characterize the detailed stratigraphy and structural geology for the Devonian Catskill Formation in this region.

Author(s): Kyle Faraci, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: Smart Garden

Abstract: The Smart Garden is designed to make gardening and maintaining plants an easy task for users. This is done through the use of multiple sensors to monitor the plant and then communicate with the watering system. The sensors used include moisture sensors, temperature and humidity sensors, and flow meters. The communication between sensors and the system

relies on an XBee Series 2 coordinator and several XBee Series 2 routers. The watering system is gravity fed, meaning that once the solenoid valve is told to open the water will flow freely to the plants. The solenoid valve, however, will not open unless told to do so by the XBee, based on the data that is collected.

Author(s): Samantha Carey, Zachary Gathmann, and David Ng Lee

Faculty Advisor: Mario Bkassiny"

"Title: Why Representation & Culturally Responsive Education Matters:  Voices from TOC II Scholars

Abstract: The School of Education Teacher Opportunity Corps (TOC II) Scholars believes that representation matters in the 21st Century classroom, and more importantly that culturally responsive education matters today too.  One important objective of becoming a teacher is being culturally and linguistically responsive, however, how do we prepare pre-service teachers to enter urban communities if they are not culturally mindful? How do we change the narrative, remove the single story and ensure cultural competence among educators in P-12 schools to make sure that all students reach their full potential?  During this 50-minute session, TOC II scholars will share their personal stories on why they want to teach in urban schools, their perspective on what it means to be a culturally responsive educator, and how they believe TOC II and the School of Education is preparing them to be an effective educator for all.

In 2016, The New York State Department of Education awarded sixteen colleges and universities with grant money to increase the number of historically underrepresented and economically disadvantaged individuals entering and being retained in teaching fields.  SUNY Oswego’s School of Education was one of the schools awarded funding, $325,000 a year for five years, totaling $1.63 million, to continue efforts to recruit, prepare and graduate teacher candidates of color to diversify the teaching workforce.

Author(s): co-presenters:  Tamara Dalton, Leilani Leslie, Anabelle Maldonado, Stacey Malone, Astrid Menjivar, Leeza Rooper, Alexa Simeon, and Venise Valcarcel, with Tamara and Venise as the moderators"

"Title: Discover Wellness:Find a Healthier You

Abstract: The researchers will take you through five stages of health programming,  showcasing their transferable skills: needs assessment, data analysis, program planning, program implementation, and program evaluation.  Researchers will begin by discussing their process of a health needs assessment from the planning stages to the implementation stages of faculty and staff at SUNY Oswego.  Then researchers will discuss how they analyzed the needs assessment data, planned programs based on the findings, started the implementation process of these programs on campus and evaluated the effectiveness of the program.

Author(s): Sara Meal, Christian Dejesus, Shannon Stone, Richard McCabe"

"Title: Expression and Purification of Complement Component 2

Abstract: The purpose of this research is to express and purify complement component 2 (C2). The complement system is important to host defense and immunity and improper regulation of the complement system can lead to inflammatory diseases. Deficiency of C2 has been reported to be associated with certain autoimmune diseases. The methodology for expressing C2 is an E. coli expression system and the samples are sent out to be sequenced. The sequence is analyzed to determine if it contains the C2 gene. Once C2 has been expressed it can be purified. The purified C2 can be used to naturally activate the complement system to study the interactions between complement component 3 (C3) and the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin.

Author(s): Lainey Archibee"

"Title: Petrographic Analysis of Payne Lake granite contact zone, Jefferson County, New York

Abstract: The purpose of this project was to perform a petrographic analysis of the Payne Lake contact zone between the granite body of the northwestern cliff face and the metasedimentary body on the southeastern side. Samples were collected at Payne Lake from the cliff face using a canoe, and made into thin sections. The samples were then analyzed under a polarized microscope to perform a petrographic analysis. The resulting samples shown will picture a suite of rocks detailing this contact metamorphic zone between the granite body and metasedimentary body.

Author(s): Tyler Petty, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: Wort Composition In Malted Grains

Abstract: The purpose of this project is to determine sugar compositions and sugar concentrations in wort solutions while varying temperature and malt type. It is expected that with any given temperature and malt type, sugar compositions will differ while comparing the same malt at different temperatures and different malts at the same temperature. It is also expected that during the mashing process there will be a time in which maximum sugar concentration is reached. To determine sugar concentration, mash solutions are prepared a three different temperatures, 61, 67 and 71 ?C. Concentrations were collected using refractometry, samples were mashed for 2 hours collecting a reading every 5 minutes. For sugar compositions samples will be mashed at 60, 65 and 70 ?C, sugar compositions are to be analyzed via high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The brewing and fermentation sectors are a multibillion dollar industry. Determining at what time maximum sugar concentration is reached allows for increased efficiency in the mashing process, saving time and resources. Determining sugar compositions at differing temperatures can enable brewers to pinpoint a certain trait in the final beer product.

Author(s): Noah Davidson, David Eckler"

"Title: Addressing Poverty Issues in Mental Health Counseling

Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the importance of understanding poverty in counseling contexts and to address best practices in working with clients who experience poverty in rural and urban settings.  Attendees will have an opportunity to engage in an experiential activity and discussion following the presentation.

Author(s): Stacy Baum"

"Title: The Dramaturgy Hub Initiative

Abstract: The process of theatrical dramaturgy has long relied on physical research binders to supply directors, designers and actors with contextual materials that assist to illuminate the details behind the scenes. In this presentation Dr. Toby Malone will discuss his 'Dramaturgy Hub Initiative', a digital repository for research materials that has changed the way SUNY Oswego Theatre department productions have interacted with dramaturgy.

Author(s): Toby Malone"

"Title: Origin and development of the Devil’s Bedstead pyroxenite within the Pioneer Mountains metamorphic core complex, central Idaho

Abstract: The Pioneer Mountain metamorphic core complex in central Idaho is primarily composed of granites and metamorphosed sedimentary rocks from the Belt Supergroup and has been dated to ~2.6 Ga. Much of the complex has been exposed at the surface due to activity along the Wildhorse fault. Among the numerous igneous and metamorphic intrusions in the core complex is the Devil’s Bedstead pyroxenite. This pyroxenite is unique, in that it was discovered at ~11,000 feet (>3.3 km) above sea level. Its composition and characteristics suggest that it did not form in the mantle as the majority of pyroxenites do, but rather, originated from a crustal basaltic magma chamber. Given that pyroxenites are exceedingly rare at Earth’s surface, we aim to determine the timing of formation and emplacement of this pyroxenite, and its relationship to the regional core complex geology. The pyroxenite may have emerged during uplift events that exposed rocks from the root of the mountain, or it may have formed later on during a volcanic eruption in the region called the Challis Volcanic Event (CVE). Petrological and whole rock geochemical analyses have been performed on samples collected of the Devil’s Bedstead pyroxenite and surrounding rocks, in an effort to characterize textural and compositional changes in the intrusion across its width. Initial petrological results show a slight change in mineral crystal size and compositional changes (including alteration) throughout the intrusion. Whole rock geochemical analysis will be used to trace fluid migration throughout the intrusion and across the entire region, and correlate it to other intrusions and structures within the core complex. Characterizing the fluctuation in trace elements across the entire intrusion will lead to a more comprehensive model of formation and emplacement of the pyroxenite. The formation and composition of the Devil’s Bedstead pyroxenite has also been directly compared to that of several pyroxenites found throughout the Adirondack region in New York State. Allthough the pyroxenites in New York State formed at much deeper depths and in a different manner to the Devil's Bedstead pyroxenite, this comparison will help constrain a possible formation mechanism for the Devil's Bedstead pyroxenite.

Author(s): Leah Knapp, Rachel Lee, and Brian Hough"

"Title: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Amino Acids in latent fingerprints

Abstract: The object of this research is to identify amino acids in a latent fingerprint and analyze them qualitatively and quantitatively. IAFIS, the database of fingerprint maintained by FBI, only has 61 million ten-print. If a fingerprint from a crime scene does not be matched with the database, it should be analyzed and get information such as class characteristics to narrow suspects. Class characteristics which may be potentially be determined from fingerprint are sex, age and dietary habits. Especially, in this research, amino acids, one of the components of fingerprint will be analyzed and determine relation between concentration of amino acids and sex. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify amino acid. Standard amino acids sample were prepared by spiking a glass slide with standard amino acids, which were wiped with “wet” Q-tip, derivatized with BSTFA, and analyzed with GC-MS. Fingerprint samples were prepared by placing a fingerprint on a glass slide, and were analyzed with the same procedure as the standard samples. In a result of GC-MS, asparagine, cysteine, glycine, lysine methionine, serine and some other amino acid has been identified.

Author(s): Joonwoo Park"

"Title: Effect of bias on strategy decisions in the Monty Hall Dilemma

Abstract: The Monty Hall Dilemma is one that many people may have seen, but they are often not aware of the probabilities behind it. The MHD involves a simple task where participants choose a door, have all but one other door revealed, and then are offered the option to choose either their initial choice or the remaining door.  The most effective strategy is to always switch doors, but participants often fail to switch, even arguing that staying is the superior strategy.  Our experiment included two conditions, with either a 3 or 11 door version.  We wanted to test how strategies for handling the MHD changed, specifically when the probabilities of winning or losing were different from the standard, and if participants would be more aware of the altered probabilities if they had a larger number of doors to choose from. The task also allowed us to ask participants directly about the strategies they used. We hoped that bias might allow participants to better understand the strategy behind the MHD and provide insight into the underlying mechanism of belief.

Author(s): Briann Wood, Theo Rhodes"

"Title: Using Bio-Feedstock to Synthesize Compostable Plastics

Abstract: The impact of plastic waste on the environment is visible everywhere, yet no one can deny the utility of plastics in everyday life. How do we balance our reliance on plastic with environmental concerns? One method is through compostable plastics. These materials contain a specific chemical structure, acetal bonds, in the backbone of the plastic to aid environmental decomposition.  Poly(acetal)s (as they are known) are made to decompose into their raw materials when left in the environment. By designing these raw materials based on biological molecules, we can avoid harmful byproducts and make the plastic safer for a variety of uses. The plastics can potentially be modified with various chemical functional groups that will provide further control over the properties of the plastic. Poly(acetal)s in particular break down under conditions commonly found in compost piles.  Given that a non-toxic bio-feedstock is used to produce the raw material, the resulting plastic is a material that can be safely decomposed into the environment.

Author(s): Kyler Anderson"

"Title: Programmable Guitar Pedal

Abstract: The guitar pedal will make use of digital circuitry programmed in VHDL on an FPGA to simulate analog guitar effect circuitry. The pedal will use two different effects that can be switched between by the player during play.

Author(s): Greg Amin Abbass

Faculty Advisor: Marianne Hromalik"

"Title: I, Too, Am Study Abroad (ITASA) panel presentation and picture display on SUNY and NY Stands with Puerto Rico Service Learning

Abstract: The goal of the panel presentation is for students to express why they chose to go to Puerto Rico to assist, what they learned from the experience, and lastly help students in attendance identify their own skills that inspire them to participate in future service learning initiatives. We plan to have a group of 5 students to present who are from diverse ethnic backgrounds and fields of study.   

Apart from the panel presentation, we will have pictures enlarged for display.

Author(s): Braun, Tim

Glidden, Lisa

O'Toole, Joanne

Rivera, Maggie

Gillett, Kelsey"

"Title: The effect of phenolic compound concentrations in staghorn sumac seeds on the winter foraging behaviors of birds

Abstract: The focus of this project is to determine if variation in foraging on sumac by birds was influenced by concentrations of four phenolic compounds commonly occurring in berries of this plant through November to March. The level of foraging depends on the concentrations of phenolic compounds in sumac seeds so it is hypothesized that the level of foraging will increase as spring approaches due to the breakdown of the compounds throughout winter. The phenolic compounds under investigation were gallic acid, tannic acid, ellagic acid, and caffeic acid. An extraction method for extracting the phenolic compounds from seeds and an HPLC method for separating and quantifying these compounds were developed. The sumac seed samples were picked every week from Rice Creek and analyzed for the concentrations of phenolic compounds. The results so far show decrease in the concentration of these compounds. We will continue sampling the seeds and analyzing until March to have better conclusions.

Author(s): Hailey Russell"

"Title: Untangling Metabolic Cooperation: An Investigation into the metabolic profiles of Lactobacillus bacteria

Abstract: The composition of the microbiome has been shown to significantly impact the nutrition and health of the fruit fly Drosophila, as well as other animals. Interestingly, the gut microbes Acetobacter faburum and Lactobacillus brevis appear to have a mutualistic relationship, reaching higher cell densities when grown in co-culture than when they are grown separately. It has been previously shown that the increased Acetobacter growth was in part caused by their utilization of both lactic acid and ethanol, two common by-products of Lactobacillus species. Although positive interactions have been seen between A. fabarum and several Lactobacillus species, it is not a universal phenomenon. L. fermentum, for example, does not appear to benefit from the presence of Acetobacter. It is hypothesized that different species of Lactobacillus may produce different amounts of the key metabolites essential to the mutualism. This project seeks to better understand cross-feeding between these two bacteria by analyzing Lactobacillus metabolic profiles via head-space solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS). The concentrations of ethanol and 1-Butanol were determined for two different Lactobacilli. Studying the metabolic connections between these two groups of bacteria can help to reveal important interactions within the microbiome and their impact on animal health and nutrition.

Author(s): Andrew Sommer"

"Title: Optimizing Complement Factor H Expression in Yeast

Abstract: The complement system is part of the innate immune system found in mammals. It is responsible for providing defense against pathogens such as bacteria and funguses, and it plays a role in the removal of damaged cells. Complement can be activated via three different pathways to start a cascade that results in various effector functions. Our lab is interested in eluding a molecular level understanding of the protein interactions that regulate complement activation. In particular, we study complement factor H (CFH) which is a known regulator of C3. CFH is a 150 kDa glycoprotein made up of 20 globular complement control protein units. We have successfully expressed the full length CFH in Pichia pastoris. We have been able to purify small amounts of CFH but are looking for ways to optimize the production process. We have developed a time-based matrix to vary the amount of time the yeast grows in BMGY, a glycerol growth medium, and the amount of time the yeast spends in BMMY, a methanol-based induction medium. Additionally, we have varied the amount of methanol in the medium. We are also looking at expressing a truncated CFH protein in yeast because only domains 1-4 are important for C3 regulation.

Author(s): Matthew Gehm, Lorenzo D’Amore"

"Title: Petrology of the Inwood marble, New York City

Abstract: The Cambrian Inwood Marble is a dolomitic high-grade marble used in building within the United States since the 1800s. Core samples were recently collected from the type locality within New York City.  To better understand what makes up this marble and how it formed, samples of the drill cores will be cut, polished and sectioned for detailed petrologic analysis. A suite of petrographic photomicrographs will be presented that will display the diverse mineralogy and internal rock fabrics.  These pieces of information are clues to conditions during the formation of this marble.

Author(s): Tristan Dietschler, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: Penfield Library Display to Archives Faculty & Staff Luncheon (Reservation Required)

Abstract: The annual Display to Archives luncheon recognizes the scholarly and creative efforts of all of SUNY Oswego's faculty and professional staff, particularly highlighting the faculty and staff who donated their work to the College Archives in the past year. Pre-registration required.

Author(s): Penfield Library, President's Office, Provost's Office"

"Title: Creative Writing Awards

Abstract: The 51st annual Creative Writing Awards features readings by the winners of awards in fiction, poetry, nonfiction, screenwriting, and playwriting.

Author(s): We do not yet have the names of the award winners. These will be selected by outside judges by Mar. 15."

"Title: Agricultural Testing and Analysis Laboratories: What is important to know about Grains!

Abstract: SUNY Oswego Agricultural Testing and Analysis Laboratories (Ag Lab) has been active since 2015 and offers internships to our science students to test grain quality, both at the Port of Oswego Authority and in our Shineman laboratory. Our students learn the most robust techniques to assess the presence of moisture, proteins, oils, grain density, enzyme activity and quantification of foreign material and toxins in grains and flours. Our partnership with the Port of Oswego Authority and Perdue Agribusiness allows our interns to be trained in the forefront of the activities that apply science and business by having real world experiences. Since inception, more than 50 students have benefited from this internship and gained new and valuable insights of the importance of grains as part of our diet and as an economic driving force for our regional farmers, grain handlers and grain feeders.

Author(s): CHARLOTTE LABRIE-CLEARY, HANNA GREULICH"

"Title: Mapping Oswego Service Project B

Abstract: Students will present their digital map creations from the Team Taught Mapping Oswego DIgital Humanities Service learning Project.

Author(s): Soc 367, CSC 322, NAS 100, ANT 356, ISC 325, GEO 305"

"Title: Mapping Oswego Service Learning Project #1

Abstract: Students will present their digital map creations from the Team Taught Mapping Oswego DIgital Humanities Service learning Project.

Author(s): Each Course will have a presentation represented.    The courses include:

SOC 367, CSC 322, NAS 100, ANT 356, ISC 325, GEO 305"

"Title: Mapping Oswego Service Project C

Abstract: Students will present their digital map creations from the Team Taught Mapping Oswego DIgital Humanities Service learning Project.

Author(s): One representative from each class:  Soc 367, CSC 322, NAS 100, ANT 356, ISC 325, GEO 305"

"Title: Study Abroad Experiences

Abstract: Students who have received a GETGO travel grant, will be discussing their experiences of studying abroad.

Author(s): At this time, i do not have the students' name"

"Title: Presentations on studying abroad experiences.

Abstract: Students who have received a GETGO travel grant, will be discussing their experiences of studying abroad.

Author(s): At this time, i do not have the names of the students."

"Title: Identifying Suboptimal Effort With the WJ IV COG

Abstract: Students may exhibit poor effort during an evaluation for a variety of reasons. Relatively few studies have explored the measurement of effort during psychoeducational evaluations. School psychologists need efficient, accurate methods to assess students’ effort to ensure validity of results and recommendations. This study examines the use of several WJ IV COG clusters to discriminate among individuals instructed to feign a psychological disorder and those asked to provide typical effort.

Author(s): Laura Spenceley, Nicole Maether, Raychel Kramer"

"Title: Using Psychoeducational Test Data to Identify Feigned Effort

Abstract: Students may exhibit poor effort during an evaluation for a variety of reasons. Relatively few studies have explored the measurement of effort during psychoeducational evaluations. School psychologists need efficient, accurate methods to assess students’ effort to ensure validity of results and recommendations. This study examines the use of several WJ IV COG clusters to discriminate among individuals instructed to feign a psychological disorder and those asked to provide typical effort.

Author(s): Nicole Maether, M. S., Raychel Kramer, B. A., Laura Spenceley, Ph.D."

"Title: Mapping Oswego Service Project D

Abstract: Students from the team taught services project, will be presenting their digital maps of Oswego.

Author(s): Representatives from each class: Soc 367, CSC 322, NAS 100, ANT 356, ISC 325, GEO 305"

"Title: Structure and function studies of 3DL1, an enzyme of unknown function

Abstract: Structural properties of an enzyme of unknown function derived from Klebsiella pneumonia were investigated in the presence and absence of zinc using circular dichroism. Function is often tied to structure, and often a structure for a protein or enzyme of unknown function may be similar to that of a known protein. In addition to this, further tests involving enzymatic assays were performed to attempt to elucidate or narrow down potential substrates or targets of this enzyme by monitoring the rate at which enzymatic action occurs to yield a colored product. The relevance of this project comes from the necessity to identify potential enzymatic action of proteins of unknown function. Through this, some proteins could become useful for treatment of human disease or lead to a greater understanding of their cause.

Author(s): Richard DeMaddis"

"Title: Development of a Stimuli-Responsive Molecule for Initiation of a Polymer

Abstract: Stimuli responsive molecules have the ability to change their properties in response to an applied stimulus. These stimuli may come in the form of chemical, physical or biological changes in the environment; such as changes in pH, temperature or the introduction of an enzyme or metabolite. This project focuses on an organic molecule that can undergo a chemical change resulting from the introduction of ultraviolet light as the stimulus. The process required to create the desired organic compound utilizes a six step reaction pathway that involves the synthesis and purification of each molecule along the way. This particular molecule has been synthesized before but the steps weren’t optimized. The goal of this project is to reduce the number of steps in the synthetic pathway and to increase the overall percent yield of the desired initiator. Currently two reactions have been effectively removed shortening the pathway to four steps instead of six.  These eliminations are invaluable in terms of cost effectiveness and time consumption.

Author(s): Emma Kuczkowski, Christopher Serrano"

"Title: Autonomous Unsupervised FPGA Deskewing Device for High-Speed Data Transfer

Abstract: Skew is a potential problem that occurs in applications that transfer data at high frequencies. This can result in inaccurate readings. This project essentially solves the problem of skew by creating FPGA firmware that deskews data over multiple data lines. In order to test the firmware, an analog input testing system is used to create real data sampled at high frequencies that are deliberately skewed and then deskewed by the firmware. The comparison between the skewed data and the data after it is gone through the deskew system is presented graphically.

Author(s): Brian Emigholz, Joshua Willson, Tyler Johnson, and Thomas Jackson 

Faculty advisor: Marianne Hromalik"

"Title: Development and Synthesis of Environmentally Friendly Poly(disulfide)s

Abstract: Since the 1950s, plastics have become an integral part of daily life in the form of consumer goods, construction materials, and packaging. The tremendous increase of plastics produced and utilized poses a threat to the environment and ecosystems. This threat includes the extraction of petroleum as crude oil to the pollution of bodies of water and landmasses world-wide. Though the development of biodegradable plastics is raising, there are many obstacles to overcome. A possible solution is the development of a class of environmentally friendly plastics that meet specific conditions. These conditions include being derived from biomass, being non-finite recyclable and being able to degrade in any environment. For this project, we are focused on creating polymers that meet as many of these conditions as possible. We are using lipoic acid, an antioxidant commonly consumed as a supplement, coupled with a variety of functional groups to synthesize our raw materials that will eventually be converted to plastics. With the successful synthesis of the desired raw material, we want to explore different conditions that will lead to greater yields of our plastic and more desirable products. To characterize the synthesized materials, we will be using a new instrument known as a gel permeation chromatography system. This analysis will identify the molecular characteristics of the plastics synthesized and provide an idea of how reproducible our procedures are.

Author(s): Jasmine Gomez"

"Title: Homemade External Cavity-Diode Laser (ECDL) for Spectroscopy Applications

Abstract: Semiconductor diode lasers are widely used in variety of applications due to their ease of use, compact size, robustness, availability, and affordability. Among those, external-cavity diode lasers (ECDL) are even more attractive within the scientific community due to wide range of frequency tunability and high frequency resolution which make them ideal for many spectroscopy applications. Based on an existing design and modifications, we present a homemade external-cavity diode laser which will be used in our future experiments dedicated to precision atomic structure measurements such as hyperfine splittings and isotope shifts.

Author(s): Gregory Abbass

 Sachintha Herath

 Lawrence Paice and

 P. M. Rupsinghe"

"Title: Migration of the Taconic deformation front across the mid-Atlantic Piedmont:  evidence from detailed porphyroblast analysis

Abstract: Researchers have debated the characterization, relative timing, and absolute timing of Paleozoic deformation and metamorphic events in the mid-Atlantic Piedmont more than a century. Advances in zircon and Ar/Ar geochronology have generally provided valuable timing information about provenance of these metasedimentary rocks, the timing of metamorphic events, and cooling history. But, it is difficult to sort out most published ages because they are not reported in the context of textural evidence for poly-metamorphism or in the context of deformation fabrics. This investigation re-examined deformation and metamorphic fabrics within the Octoraro Formation, one of the most geographically extensive suites of metasedimentary rock in the entire mid-Atlantic Piedmont. Earlier researchers identified multiple metamorphic and deformation fabrics in these rocks (e.g. Fraser, 1880), and a general diachronous relationship exists between metamorphism and the primary deformation fabrics (e.g. Valentino, 1994). In effect, the relative timing of deformation and metamorphism are not the same everywhere within the Octoraro Formation, and documenting the details of porphyroblasts relative to deformation fabrics has provided insight into the tectonic evolution. From southeast to northwest, the relative timing between deformation and metamorphism as revealed through porphyroblast inclusion fabrics, shows that northwestward deformation was superimposed on progressive low-grade Barrovian metamorphism that increased with structural depth. This means that rocks were deformed prior to metamorphism in the hinterland, and the deformation outlasted early metamorphism toward the foreland. The transition from pre-kinematic, syn-kinematic and post-kinematic porphyroblast growth have been delineated geographically, and there does not seem to be a direct correlation with the regional metamorphic zones previously mapped (Valentino and Faill, 1994). Although they occurred in a broad sense together, the metamorphism and deformation of the Octoraro Formation appear to be very much independent. The entire transition between these domains is preserved within the core of the Octoraro Formation, and future detailed zircon geochronology in the context of deformation fabrics and porphyroblast generation, may provide rates of deformation front migration at the scale of the orogeny.

Author(s): Christopher Weiman, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: International and Global Reception with Year of Korea Panel

Abstract: Reception to celebrate guests interested in discussing topics surrounding international issues that includes Year of Korea Panel Discussion. All are welcome.

Light refreshments will be served. Sponsored by Phi Beta Delta and IGE

Author(s): Phi Beta Delta and IGE"

"Title: Detailed analysis of lacustrine sedimentary rocks from the Mesozoic Newark Basin, NY and NJ

Abstract: Recently acquired drill cores from the Newark rift basin are being analyzed for the detailed stratigraphy, select sedimentary petrology and magnetic susceptibility.  These core logs in addition to the physical analyses will aid in the understanding of the detailed sedimentation history represented by these rock cores.  A suite of original photomicrographs spanning the range of rock composition will be presented, in addition to detailed magnetic susceptibility log generated from scans and spot analyses of the cores.

Author(s): Claudia Halbauer, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: Crystallization of the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin (TMD1)

Abstract: Protein crystallization is an incredibly helpful tool in which the 3D structure of a protein or enzyme can become known through the use of x-ray diffraction. The structure can then help us predict or understand how a protein or enzyme interacts with other molecules. Without the discovery of crystal structures, it would be much more difficult to design pharmaceutical drugs to understand many biological functions, and to understand aspects of genetics. In this research, the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin (TMD1) was isolated and purified. After purification, crystallization of the protein will be attempted using several varying conditions in the Hampton Research Crystal Screen HR2-110 kit. TMD1 makes important interactions with proteins involved in the immune response.

Author(s): Vanessa Wiltsie. Amarachukwu Ajoku"

"Title: Collaborative Composition and Performance in Electronic Music

Abstract: Professor Paul Leary has collaborated on an original musical composition which includes an interactive performance. Paul Leary and students Nicky Radford and Zahra Bellucci will perform this original work and explain its genesis and how the collaborative process worked. They will also share the performance they had of this work at the Root Signal Music Festival in Statesboro, GA in February.

Author(s): Paul Leary, Nicky Radford, Zahra Bellucci"

"Title: Productivity Fluctuation

Abstract: Productivity is thought to fluctuate based on factors that include days of the week and type of worker (morningness: morning vs. evening person). To extend previous research, the present study evaluated productivity across days of the week and morningness, thereby allowing an assessment of interaction effects. Results show that productivity is lowest on Friday's and that this effect was independent of morningness (i.e., no interaction effect) at all times of day.

Author(s): Samira Todd, Shannon Yearwood"

"Title: The Effects of Age on Proactive Control in Healthy Adults

Abstract: Proactive inhibitory control is the ability to restrain a behaviour based on prior experience and anticipation, and hence an important aspect in cognitive control. Previous studies have provided inconsistent results on proactive control in older adults, with some showing age-related impairment and other showing no effects of age. The current study aimed to examine the effect

of age on proactive inhibition using a stop signal task (SST). One-hundred-and-forty-nine adults, between the ages of 18 to 72, underwent fMRI while performing the SST. In the SST, frequent go signals instructed participants to respond and less frequent stop signals instructed them to withhold their responses. Accuracy and reaction time on go trials and stop trials were recorded.

A Bayesian belief model was used to compute a participants’ trial-by-trial estimate of the likelihood of a stop signal, or p(Stop). A higher p(Stop) is a reflection of increased anticipation of a stop signal which may prolong the go trial reaction time (goRT). The sequential effect defined as the correlation between the estimated p(Stop) and goRT was used to measure proactive inhibition. Behaviorally, the magnitude of sequential effect was not significantly correlated with age. In the brain, age was associated with greater activations to p(Stop) in bilateral prefrontal cortex, left superior parietal lobule, and cerebellum, and activation to prolonged goRT in the right inferior occipital gyrus. These results suggest spared proactive control in older adults, presumably supported by a neural compensatory mechanism manifested by greater activations in the prefrontal, parietal, and occipital regions.

Author(s): Manna Job, Samantha Jenks, Chiang-shan R. Li, Sien Hu"

"Title: The Effects of Age on Proactive Control in Healthy Adults

Abstract: Proactive inhibitory control is the ability to restrain a behaviour based on prior experience and anticipation, and hence an important aspect in cognitive control. Previous studies have provided inconsistent results on proactive control in older adults, with some showing age-related impairment and other showing no effects of age. The current study aimed to examine the effect

of age on proactive inhibition using a stop signal task (SST). One-hundred-and-forty-nine adults, between the ages of 18 to 72, underwent fMRI while performing the SST. In the SST, frequent go signals instructed participants to respond and less frequent stop signals instructed them to withhold their responses. Accuracy and reaction time on go trials and stop trials were recorded.

A Bayesian belief model was used to compute a participants’ trial-by-trial estimate of the likelihood of a stop signal, or p(Stop). A higher p(Stop) is a reflection of increased anticipation of a stop signal which may prolong the go trial reaction time (goRT). The sequential effect defined as the correlation between the estimated p(Stop) and goRT was used to measure

proactive inhibition. Behaviorally, the magnitude of sequential effect was not significantly correlated with age. In the brain, age was associated with greater activations to p(Stop) in bilateral prefrontal cortex, left superior parietal lobule, and cerebellum, and activation to prolonged goRT in the right inferior occipital gyrus. These results suggest spared proactive

control in older adults, presumably supported by a neural compensatory mechanism manifested by greater activations in the prefrontal, parietal, and occipital regions.

Author(s): Manna Job, Samantha Jenks"

"Title: Synthesis of polychalcogenide compounds in different solvents

Abstract: Polychalcogenide compounds are used as high temperature lubricants, battery cathode materials, superconductors, semiconductors, and catalysts. The term polychalcogenide is referring to the anion of the form Qn2– where Q is either sulfur, selenium, or tellurium and n can be any number from 1 to 6. Compounds containing polychalcogenides are commonly studied because of their ability to form diverse structures that have varying stoichiometries which in turn lead to a variety of chemical properties. In this study the copper polychalcogindes will be investigated using different reaction solvents. Different species are formed when a polychalgenide salt is dissolved in different solvents, such as water, ethanol, acetone, and ethylenediamine. Sealed polymer pouches are used in acid digestion reactors to perform these solvothermal synthesises. The products are then filtered and analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction.

Author(s): Tienna Deroy"

"Title: Development of a Photodegradable Polymer

Abstract: Plastics (also referred to as polymers) are typically thought of as strong, durable materials that do not break down easily in the environment. This is an issue because it is resulting in an abundance of plastic pollution. This project aims to develop a polymer that can be broken down by light as a stimulus. The first step in the project is to successfully synthesize the monomer (i.e., the raw material used to make polymers), followed by polymerization of the monomer to form polymers. Upon successful polymerization, the degradation of the synthesized material can be tested. When the plastic is exposed to UV-light, the polymers will follow a path of degradation. Each step in the synthesis required set-up, work-up, purification, and characterization. The current phase of the project is the synthesis of the monomer.

Author(s): Angela Frampton"

"Title: Common Student Misconceptions in Physics Classes: Mechanics

Abstract: Physics is an important and amazing field of study. However, Physics can be a complicated subject for some students. There are several different topics and areas of physics where students seem to develop or have previously acquired misconceptions. It is possible for these common misconceptions to be found by taking a closer look at what a students’ rational is when they are answering a question. To do this, a Physics survey was created based on several topics in the introductory mechanics unit covered in a college-level physics course. Participants were asked to answer ten questions covering a range of topics including graphs of motion, force, and mechanical energy. Answers to the survey were multiple choice along with a brief explanation with each answer to better identify the cognitive process of participants and diminish guessing. The surveys were collected and all responses were analyzed for any common errors. Using the data collected, we identified the physics misconceptions. We created and implemented new pedagogical strategies aimed to clarify the physics concepts. Some say Physics can be a challenging subject to learn, but with the appropriate student-centered classroom techniques, it is possible for anyone to not only succeed, but find a greater passion for the field.

Author(s): Kyle Bautista"

"Title: Viewing demographic characteristics and outcomes on self-assessed questionnaires through the use of MANOVA statistical testing

Abstract: Participants that met the criteria of an alcohol addiction, based off of the DSM-5, from a community in Buffalo, New York, partook in a treatment study that aimed to assess alcohol-related behaviors and tendencies after receiving treatment every three months after the treatment session. Participants filled out a series of questionnaires throughout six different periods, once at the start of the study (at baseline) and after the treatment sessions, then every three months after the post treatment for a total of 12 months. Four one-way between-subjects multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) were conducted to determine the relationship of two demographic characteristics: 1) years of education: coded 1=didn't complete high school; 2=graduated high school; 3=GED; 4=technical/professional school beyond high school; 5=some college or education after high school; 6=completed associate's; 7=graduated college (bachelor's); 8=some graduate school beyond Bachelor's; 9=graduate degree), and 2) employment status: coded 1=employed full time; 2=employed part time; 3=not employed by looking for work; 4=not employed, not looking for work; 5=disabled; 6=retired) on dependent variables of two different questionnaires; the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (cognitive complexity, motor impulsiveness, and non-planning impulsiveness) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (anxiety, psychoticism, hostility, and interpersonal sensitivity). Significant differences were found among years of education completed and the dependent variables of the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, Pillai’s Trace = .035, F (24,300) = 1.622, p < .01. Significant differences also were found among employment status and the dependent variables of the Brief Symptom Inventory, Pillai’s Trace = .033, F (20,400) = 1.687, p < .01 and of the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, Pillai’s Trace = .003, F (15,303) = 2.409, p < .01. The results of the study indicate significant differences among employment status and dependent variables of interest on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, years of education completed and dependent variables of interest on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and employment status and dependent variables of interest on the Brief Symptom Inventory. Results suggest that future research may want to investigate additional variables that may explain these relationships.

Author(s): Maria Isidoro-Chino, Samara Rice"

"Title: Challenge Debate with SUNY Brockport

Abstract: Parliamentary style debate involving 4 person teams from SUNY Oswego and SUNY Brockport formally arguing a topic of current controversy on college campuses.

Author(s): Ethan Magram, Jacob Starowicz, William Corsi, Justique Carter, Jacob Manrow"

"Title: The First 5 Years of the New Planetarium

Abstract: Our new Planetarium officially opened on Oct. 4, 2013.  We report on the success of the first 5 years of Planetarium operation, including total and annual statistics on its use for classes, weekly public shows, and private groups from on and off campus.  We also examine changing staff and software over the years, the training of students and new operators in the Planetarium, and various highlights and milestones during our first half-decade.

Author(s): Scott Roby"

"Title: Challenges and Pathways in Child Sexual Abuse Secondary Prevention: Do Experts Believe It Will Work?

Abstract: New York has many policies in place for after an offender has been convicted. Ninety-five percent of sexual offenses are committed by first time offenders (Sandler, Freemen & Socia, 2008). This show that there is a low recidivism rate, however, there is nothing in place to prevent first time offenders. There are victim advocacy groups that exist, such as Stop It Now! And The New York Society for the prevention of cruelty to children, which teaches parents and children how to protect themselves. However, there is a stigma associated with those who are attracted to children and due to this, these individuals tend to experience poor mental health, emotion-focused coping, and social isolation (Jahnke, 2018). This may indirectly cause them to have a stronger belief that adult-child sex is morally permissible, and reduced willingness to seek professional help in case of need. In Germany, they have a prevention program in place for these individuals. The Prevention Project Dunkelfeld was a media campaign launched in 2004 to recruit those with sexual thoughts about children to seek the help they needed (Beier et. at, 2015). The results showed that treated individuals reported higher self-esteem and reduced emotion-oriented coping style. There were also reductions in emotional loneliness, emotion-oriented coping, self-efficacy defects, emotional victim empathy defects and sexual preoccupation, which indicates an increase in sexual self- regulation (Beier et. at, 2015). The purpose of this current study is to determine if experts and professionals believe that a prevention program, such as Project Dunkelfeld would work and if they believe that the community would

support a program like this. Data analysis is currently ongoing.

Author(s): Kassidy Pratt, Gilian Tenbergen"

"Title: Challenges and Pathways in Child Sexual Abuse Secondary Prevention: Qualitative Analysis of Expert Opinions

Abstract: New York has many policies in place for after an offender has been convicted. Ninety-five percent of sexual offenses are committed by first time offenders . This shows that the recidivism rate of sex offenders is low and that there could be a prevention program in place that could diminish the 95% first time offenders (Sandler, Freemen & Socia, 2008). Many experts or professionals that work with sex offenders find the current policies lack effectiveness in reducing recidivism (Levenson, Fortney & Baker, 2010). Clinicians also recognize post-conviction policies lead to many collateral consequences such as isolation, stigmatization, trouble finding housing and gainful employment. However correctional professionals disagree that the offenders have any further consequences after release (Call, 2018). Currently, there are prevention programs in place that educate parents about the signs of sexual abuse and educating children on what is appropriate and inappropriate contact with adults (Stop it Now!, NYSPCC).  What is lacking however is prevention at the source, i.e. involving individuals who may be at risk of engaging in child sexual abuse in the process. The Prevention Project Dunkelfeld was a media campaign launched in 2004 to recruit those with sexual thoughts about children to seek the help they needed (Beier et. al, 2015). The participants that met the DSM 5 diagnostic for pedophilia were eligible for this program and were split into groups of six and participated in weekly 3-hour sessions over 45 to 50 weeks (Beier et. al, 2015). The results showed that treated individuals reported higher self-esteem and reduced emotion-oriented coping style. There were also reductions in emotional loneliness, emotion-oriented coping, self-efficacy defects, emotional victim empathy defects and sexual preoccupation, which indicates an increase in sexual self- regulation (Beier et. at, 2015). 

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the opinions of experts and professionals that work in the field of child sexual abuse. Specifically what challenges do experts think a CSA prevention program targeting pedophilic individuals will face and will the challenges differ depending on the region? Do experts think that the consumption of exploitive images or pornography play a role in child sexual abuse? We hypothesize that experts will think that convincing the community will be the biggest challenge that this prevention program faces. 

 We measured whether they believe this prevention program would be beneficial in helping to reduce the number of child sex abuse cases. Methods used in the current study were online questionnaires administered via Qualtrics. It was either emailed directly to professionals in the state of New York or that was emailed out to the members of New York State Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers/Alliance for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse. 

We collected both qualitative and quantitative data. Data analysis is currently ongoing however initial results suggest overall support for the program, with participants mentioning concerns for program structure, treatment goals, and issues with anonymity. This poster will discuss primarily the qualitative results for this study.

Author(s): Lynnell Cote, Gilian Tenbergen"

"Title: What you don't know about English

Abstract: Native speakers of English speak English expertly, but almost completely without awareness of the linguistic patterns underlying what we say. The presenters will illustrate what we mean by that statement, and connect these patterns to their historical origins to show the process of how and why we speak English the way we do today.

Author(s): Sidney Merine, Jean Ann"

"Title: Fresh Water For All - Puerto Rico Alternative Break Initiative- Winter 2019

Abstract: Members of the Puerto Rico Alternative Break Trip will discuss their Fresh Water For All initiative- How it began and its impact to the Naranjito community in Puerto Rico.

Author(s): Kristen Bella, Mahalia Tiburcio, Michelle Uroza, Jayvana Perez, Micah Pasinski"

"Title: Step into the Shoes of the Apollo 15 Astronauts: Using the Planetarium and/or Virtual Reality to Experience Lunar Missions Firsthand with the help of Open-Source 3D Modeling Software

Abstract: Many people who lived through the space race can often recall the exact moment when he/she first saw footage of astronauts on their old tube televisions. For these folks, these memories provoke feelings of achievement, admiration and awe. Unfortunately, with Mars in our sights and the younger generations’ expectations of high definition footage and imagery, the relatability of the Apollo program has waned in recent years. How can we bring back the sense of grandeur to these historic triumphs? Using NASA’s extensive archives and open source 3D modeling software, we can reconstruct the moon in a digital environment and reenact highlights of the Apollo 15 mission as if we were filling the shoes of the astronauts themselves. Moving through a digital replica of the Hadley-Appenine Region breathes new life into a historic mission that modern society pushed aside.

Author(s): Richard Frieman"

"Title: Documenting an Endangered Language: Making the First Kiowa Dictionary

Abstract: Kiowa is a critically endangered language in southwestern Oklahoma. Only ten native speakers remain, and they are all nearing ninety years old. In an effort to document the language before time runs out, SUNY Oswego’s Endangered Languages Laboratory (ELL) is part of a multi-site research project to create the first comprehensive dictionary for Kiowa. In this presentation, student research assistants from ELL present their work on the project and debut a pilot online dictionary.

Author(s): Cory Becker-Warren, Autumn Schunk, Lillian Talmage, Ian White"

"Title: Anthropology Capstone Presentations: Part I

Abstract: Jessica Allen - Can Skeletal Traits Identify Body Mass?

Understanding weight in a skeleton is important in a forensic anthropology context as it can help establish individuality of remains. Can advances of techniques and more research on skeleton remains help indicate body mass in life? The purpose of this paper is to understand whether or not body mass is indicated or shows certain traits on the bone. Body mass or weight can be a factor in reconstruction of the individual’s facial feature, which in return helps identify the individual. Estimating body mass from the bones by using morphometric and mechanical methods can vary. A wider reference sample size is needed to improve the reliability of these methods, using different populations, known and unknown medical records, and different body sizes.

Bryan Baez - 

Hali Castrovinci - Student’s Perceptions Regarding Gun Control

The ever increasing injury and death tolls as a result of gun violence spark debate amongst Americans. Proposed solutions to gun violence result in conflict between those who promote stricter gun control laws and those who promote concealed carry. As a result, no changes are made, and innocent people continue to die. As of December, 113 students have been killed or injured from of school shootings in the United States in 2018. Arguments for stricter gun control laws are met with anger from people who claim that their second amendment rights are being infringed upon. Regardless of the fact that it is the students who are being affected by these shootings and acts of violence, their perceptions on the issue are hardly, if ever, taken into account.

Colton Fallon - For What It’s Worth: A look at the commodity value opposed to the  value of cultural patrimony

In my research I hope to identify any trends in the illicit sale of cultural property pertaining to Indigenous American Groups so as to aid in repatriation. As NAGPRA has been in place for near 30 years I will be primarily looking at actions that had resided in the areas of major finds before this time, as that may be when most looting took place. My focus will be on three levels of looting from professionals that place research and resources into making returns, to semi-professional collectors, and amateur hobbyists. The looting and dale of archaeological artifacts is a serious threat in the field, linked to the prices that some artifacts may fetch on the black market. These illicit activities fall in line with art crime, though due to international sales there is more cooperation (also meaning more work) necessary to apprehend criminals and intercept sales. The results expected will vary greatly from each Tribal context. Some groups may be heavily involved in the reclamation of their patrimony, such as the case of the Sinagua in which an oral tradition elaborated upon a rich find. Other artifacts or remains have the problem of being ambiguously prehistoric, making repatriation a difficulty in itself.

Ryan Fitzgerald - Conceptualization, Participation, and Maintenance of Consumerist Behavior and Economic Inequity in Oswego County

The aim of this research project is to illuminate how community members of Oswego County understand their local economic context, and the wider state, national, and global consumer system that they participate in. The focus will be on how business owners, consumers, and the general public interact with the economic system they are immersed in, and how they understand where commodities come from, where they go to, and how wealth and poverty are constructed in modern contexts, with the aid of historical background. There will also be a focus on how individuals self-identify in this context, how they develop meaning, and understand ethical consumption. The result of this research will provide a better understanding of how members of Oswego County behave as a consumer group, how they respond to socio-economic stress, how they conceptualize amorphous topics like value and morality in consumption, and will help to provide a potential framework for more targeted and well-received social welfare programs.

Author(s): Jessica Allen, Bryan Baez, Hali Castrovinci, Colton Fallon, Ryan Fitzgerald"

"Title: Correlates of Mindfulness and Alcohol Craving Six Months after Alcohol Treatment

Abstract: It was hypothesized that there would be a significant negative correlation between the amount of time spent undergoing mindfulness techniques, and the urge to consume alcohol. This is backed by previous research supporting CBT based methods and relapse prevention for alcoholism, and mindfulness training that has resulted in physiological recovery from alcohol cues. Participants were given the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire (AUQ), and the Five-Faceted Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), composed of 5 parts. The results of each of these parts relating to the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire were calculated via Pearson's r correlations, comparing each segment of the Five- Faceted Mindfulness Questionnaire to the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire. Out of the five parts surveyed at six months, only the Observing subscale of the FFMQ was calculated to be nonsignificant (r = -.158, p > .05). The relationships between the AUQ and the Describing, (r = -.322, p < .05), Acting with awareness (r = -.437, p < .05), Nonjudging, (r = -.318, p < .05), and Nonreacting, (r = -.393, p < .05), portions of the FFMQ were significant. The results may be due to the formulations of healthier habits becoming a distraction from desiring alcohol, a specific mindfulness technique, suppressed physiological differences post-technique, or social influences. For future research, a higher number of participants during data collection, deciphering differences between solo and group activity, and more calculations based on these significant relationships over different time frames are recommended.

Author(s): Travis Cowart, Samara Rice"

"Title: A Modular Perspective of Social Motives

Abstract: Introduction: Modular theories of cognition propose that domain-specific cognitive structures help guide psychological responses to a range of social challenges. For example, a modular perspective on emotion implies that disgust and fear are experienced in response to unique sorts of threats, namely pathogen threats and physical dangers. Further, several theories of

motivation propose a hierarchical structure to these domains (e.g., Kenrick, Griskevicius, Neuberg, & Schaller, 2010), such that some motivations (e.g., hunger) are more primary than others (e.g., social affiliation). This project applies a modular perspective to test for primacy between two self-protective motivations – disease avoidance and physical threat avoidance. We primed exposed participants to video clips designed to evoke disgust, fear, or both. We then tested visual attention to disease-related, physical threat-related, and neutral stimuli. We predicted that, when participants were primed with both fear and disgust, visual attention would be most strongly directed toward physical threat-related images because, although two types of threat motivations were active, physical threats require a more urgent behavioral response. Such a pattern would be consistent with the idea that social motivations follow from domain-specific cognitive modules. 

Method: Participants watched video clips to prime disease threat (Silence of the Lambs), physical threat (Trainspotting), or both. Immediately afterwards, participants completed a  dot probe task that assesses attentional disengagement from visual stimuli. This task has been used to assess the relative activation of discrete motivations. Stimulus photos were selected from the IAPS database and were either (a) disgust-related, (b) physical threat-related, or © affectively neutral.  Priming condition was manipulated between subjects and stimulus type was manipulated within subjects to produce a 3 x 3 mixed design. 

Results: Data were analyzed using ANOVA, with stimulus type as a within-subjects factor, and priming condition as a between subjects factor. There was a significant effect of stimulus condition, F(2,230) = 22.317, p <.001. There was not a significant effect of priming condition on reaction time, F(2,115) = 1.089, p = .34. Contrary to predictions,  there was not a significant interaction between priming condition and stimulus type on reaction time, F (4,230) = 1.092, p =.36.

To further compare the average reaction times between the three different types of stimulus (neutral images, disgust images, and fear images), we performed pairwise comparisons. There was a significant difference between reaction times to disgust images and neutral images,  F(1,115) = 50.193, p < .001. There was also significant difference between reaction times to fear images and neutral images,  F (1,115) =  23.654, p < .001. However, there was no significant difference in average reaction times between disgust images and fear images, F (1, 115) =

2.803, p =.097.

Conclusion: The results indicate that the priming condition did not have an effect on reaction times. However, there was a significant effect of stimulus type on reaction times. Exposure to disgust-inducing images and fear-inducing images resulted with significantly higher reaction times compared to neutral images. This pattern was observed independent of priming condition. Results may speak to the fundamental nature of multiple threat-avoidance modules. These results are consistent with the idea that that humans are highly tuned to multiple signals of threat, regardless of context. Another possibility is that any signal of possible threat is sufficient to activate threat avoidance mechanisms across multiple domains. Future work could examine these possibilities directly by testing how reaction times compare with a control group experiencing no priming.

Author(s): Grace Roessling"

"Title: Graphene Nanoribbons: Various Gold Terminated Edge Binding Sites and Applications

Abstract: Interest in Graphene Nanoribbons (GNRs) has grown recently due to the novel electronic and structural properties exhibited by the material making them excellent candidates for spintronic and nanoelectronic devices. The most exciting application is the incorporation of GNRs in polymer hosts for the fabrication of novel composite materials. GNR are also use as electrode material for batteries and supercapacitors.

GNRs are a collection of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal honeycomb pattern along a specific direction, producing a quasi one-dimensional structure (Yang et al. 2008). The electronic properties of GNRs depend heavily on the terminating edge geometry and the width of the nanoribbon. With the need to extract charge from the nanoribbons, it is important to consider the electronic properties with the addition of a metallic particle at a binding site along the ribbon. One can infer that certain binding sites may be more energetically favorable than others, therefore this study aims to analyze graphene nanoribbons of various lengths in order to determine optimal binding sites for these particles.

Author(s): Dylan Richmond"

"Title: The Future of Solar Technology: Inkjet Printed Quantum Dot Films

Abstract: Inorganic halide perovskite quantum dot inks may have great potential in applications related to the field of inkjet-printed photovoltaics. The photoactive inks are synthesized by a wet chemical reaction and are printed into thin films using a commercial inkjet printer. The inkjet-printed films were then characterized using optical absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescent spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and electronic transport measurements. Characterization indicates that interlayer printing, alternating printed layers of CsPbBr3 and CsPbI3 , results in a halide exchange producing a high quality (220) CsPbBr2.4I0.6 quantum dot thin film. The repeatable properties of the inkjet-printed thin films suggest high quality, customizable, photovoltaic films are realizable with an inkjet printing method.

Author(s): Dylan Richmond"

"Title: It’s All Your Fault, Mr. Clarendon-Linden

Abstract: In Western New York, there is a minor fault system known as the Clarendon Linden Fault Zone that stretches from Northern Allegany Country to Lake Ontario. There are several geologic outcrops present at the surface throughout the fault zone from which a wide array of structural data can be obtained. For instance, there are multiple fractures present at these outcrops from which strike and dip measurements can be found using a geologic compass. Along with other structural features found at these outcrops, a fracture analysis of the Clarendon-Linden Fault Zone can be compiled using these field measurements. This data can then be entered into a computer program called Stereonet; which can then display it into rose diagrams and stereograms. The data that was found in the field is also compared with a couple of field guidebooks and reports that focus on the Clarendon Linden Fault Zone and its geologic features. In addition, a brief overview of the geologic material and historical geology of the Clarendon Linden Fault Zone will be provided.

Author(s): Kevin Frier, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: Seeing Through Their Eyes

Abstract: In this talk, presenters will describe a collaborative conversation each engaged in as a part of a Personal Profile assignment for a preservice teacher education course. The purpose of the assignment is to learn more about the educational impact and day-to-day experiences of people identified as having a disability.  Selected visual representations of the lived experiences of the interviewees will be on display.

Author(s): Professors Deb Quick, Donna Dennihy, Olga Powers, and Sara Pritchard-Mitchell"

"Title: Computer Science Session 3

Abstract: In this session, selected presentations of Student/Faculty collaboration projects as well as class projects will be shown.

Author(s): Shakhar Dasgupta, Landon Patmore, Michael Anilonis"

"Title: Using Assistive Technology and Powerful Teaching to Reach Common Core Standards in Reading and Writing for Students with Disabilities

Abstract: In this presentation, graduate student Cortnie Purce and Assistant Professor Dr. Carol Willard will highlight an action research project. The project utilized assistive technology to support a third grade student in reaching Common Core State Standards in writing.

Author(s): Cortnie Purce, Dr. Carol Willard"

"Title: The Effects of Hurricane Sandy on New York: Severe Weather and Insurance Premiums

Abstract: In this presentation students will explore the likelihood of repeating severe weather patterns in coastal New York and estimate the impact on New York state residents' flood insurance premiums and homeowners' property insurance premiums.

Author(s): Lars Ohlsen, Kayla Biles, Bruno Rojas, Christian Elthorp"

"Title: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo Lunar Landings

Abstract: In the current academic year, we have designed three separate public shows examining different aspects of the Apollo Moon Program, in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing this summer.  We present some visual and musical excerpts from these shows and explain the thinking behind their design.

Author(s): John Zielinski"

"Title: Temporal patterns of visual attention during working memory task in pre-adolescent children

Abstract: In recent years, research efforts increasingly focus on understanding the development of executive function in children.  This emphasis stems from the importance of this ability in educational settings as well as improved measurement of executive functions and evidence that early training can improve executive function.  Our study examines working memory (WM) which is one component of executive function.  We are interested in identifying temporal patterns of visual attention and spontaneous eye blinks as children (ages 9-11) are engaged in working memory tasks.  This approach will help us better understand the moment-to-moment patterns of visual activity that may be important in forming and maintaining representations that are utilized in working memory.

In this study, we will observe children during several tasks.  A digit span task is used to assess individual differences in working memory capacity.  We use N-back tasks as a way to follow the formation of working memories.  The N-back tasks involve presenting visual stimuli one at a time on a computer and asking participants to identify recently presented items.  Eye tracking is used during the N-back tasks so that we can follow the child’s gaze as the working memory task unfolds.  The N-back tasks include a total of 6 testing blocks, some of which have distractions and some are control blocks.  Also, we measure spontaneous eye blinking, a putative index of dopamine function that may relate to working memory capacity.

Our objectives are as follows (a) identify patterns of visual attention that relate to successful performance on the N-back tasks, (b) test whether the timing of manipulations of attention through distractions selectively disrupt memory performance, and (c) test whether participants with greater working memory capacity perform better on the N-back tasks.

Author(s): Leigh Bacher, Alex Rivera, Gabi DeAngleo, Skyler Stisser"

"Title: A Steer-by-Wire System

Abstract: In a steer-by-wire system, two electric motors are used to link the steering wheel and the rack and pinion gear module, which replace the numerous mechanical devices in between. This presentation will discuss the development of such a system replaces the standard steering column with digital signals sent between various sensors and motors. The system also imitates the steering feeling by design a resistance system to apply the forces from the wheels back to the driver and is able to integrate front/rear independent steering that allows for advanced movement at different speeds.

Author(s): Shawn Woleslagle, and Jesse Taylor

Faculty Advisor: Hui Zhang"

"Title: Behavioral And Emotional Interventions For Preschool Children  Behavioral And Emotional Interventions For Preschool Children

Abstract: In 2016, the CDC found that 1 in 6 children (17.4%) was diagnosed with a mental,

behavioral or developmental disorder (Cree, Bitsko, Robinson, Holbrook, Danielson, Smith,

Kaminski, Kenney, & Peacock, 2016). However, there is high prevalence among preschoolers

that go without being detected or treated, this becomes problematic for such behavioral and

temperamental issues (Lavigne, Binns, Christoffel, Rosenbaum, Arend, Smith, Hayford, and

McGuire, 1993). Early behavioral and emotional regulation issues can be a sign of later

long-term complications (Denham, Blair, DeMulder, Levitas, Sawyer, Auerbach-Major and

Queenan, 2003). The importance of early intervention is crucial for the development, mental

health, and emotional expression.

Author(s): Michelle Uroza, Mamta Saxena"

"Title: Monitoring subsurface water flow through an earthen dam using electrical resistivity, Rice Creek Field Station, Oswego, New York

Abstract: In 1963-1965, an earthen dam was constructed on Rice Creek, Oswego County, New York, to support field research related to the local field station (SUNY Oswego). The dam spans the width of the original creek channel, includes an overflow drain pipe, and a spillway. Although engineering records are incomplete, the core of the dam appears to consist of meter-scale blocks of stone and sediment fill. The dam is about 75 meters long and 25 meters wide (including material below the water). From vintage air photographs, it’s clear that the dam was constructed to flood an existing wetland and create the 14 acres Rice Pond. A recent survey of the pond estimates the average depth to be about 2 meters, therefore the dam holds about 8000 cubic meters of water. In 2010, a program to assess the integrity of dams on Rice Creek began and resulted in the removal of a dilapidated cement and stone dam upstream of Rice Pond. At that time, Wenner ERT surveys were conducted across the length of the dam using an automated Junior Syscal switching ER meter, 24 electrodes, 3 meters spacing, to image the entire dam and the native materials below the dam. Early surveys were completed when the creek discharge was low in late summer, and no water in the overflow drainage that passes through the dam. The burial depth of the drain pipe (construction report) provided sufficient information to convert ER pseudosections to true depth. As surveys progressed weekly through the fall months, a substantial ER low anomaly developed at about 4 m depth near the SW end of the dam, and the anomaly correlated with observed seepage on the downstream side of the dam. Further ER images showed expansion fo the low ER anomaly as the level of the pond increased through the rain and snow ridden months of late fall and early winter. This experiment was repeated again in the late summer and fall of 2018, and showed the exact same results. The low ER anomaly progressively expanded toward the southwest (left bank of filled creek channel beneath dam) and remained relatively fixed in position toward the middle of the dam. Additionally, the expansion of the low ER anomaly correlated with expansion of the seepage areas at the base of the downstream side of the dam. Clearly, as the pond water level increases, thereby increasing the internal water pressure on the dam, the original creek channel, now filled with large rocks and sediment, is a continuous conduit for water flow through and under the dam. Monitoring the dam on Rice Creek will continue for several more seasons with the objective to determine the volume of seepage.

Author(s): Geophysics Research Group: Ralph Schloss, Alison Sullivan, Benjamin Walley, Nicholas Kanauer, Michael Kensell, Rebecca Nesel, Caitlin Serowik, Mary Sorensen and Christopher Weiman, Sponsors:  Justin S. Stroup & David W. Valentino"

"Title: How a Company's Logo Positively or Negatively Effects the Company

Abstract: I will look at logos from big and small companies that are well known and not so well known. I will see how having a well designed logo will positively impact the company and the steps that it takes to create a well designed logo. I will also look at how a poor designed logo can hurt a company and what are some not-to-dos' when creating a logo. One of the most important parts of a business is how they want to brand themselves, which is key to creating a logo.

Author(s): Hannah Leva"

"Title: Modern Languages Honor Societies Induction Ceremonies

Abstract: Honor Society Induction Ceremonies for :  Italian, French and Spanish

Author(s): Dr. Susan Bertonneau, Dr. Patrick Schultz, Dr. Milton Loayza"

"Title: An Introduction to China's High-speed Railway

Abstract: High-speed railway in China is designed for speeds of 250- 350 km/h. China began it high-speed rail construction in early 21st century. Now, it is the world's longest high speed railway network(1) and is also the most extensively used(2) (3) China's high-speed rail has achieved rapid and great development in a relatively short period of time. In this presentation an introduction is given into the history, current situation and future plans of China's high-speed railway.

Author(s): Qiang Wang"

"Title: HDV Capstone Experience

Abstract: HDV faculty and students present on their experiences in the senior

capstone classes of HDV 400 Applied Methods and the linked HDV 403

community internship placements. This includes sharing their individual

project proposals and internship experiences, discussing the process of

human service program development, and their course experiences.

This will also be useful for HDV students to learn about the HDV major

and the senior capstone classes.

Author(s): Dorothy Shedlock, Laura Brown, Mamta Saxena, and HDV students"

"Title: The Stars of Spring

Abstract: Having learned the basics of creating and designing planetarium programs, we present our first short program for pointing out the stars at night for a given time of year.  This presentation will discuss some of the Spring constellations: Leo, Virgo, Libra, Ursa Major, and Bootes, along with some of the interesting astronomical objects located in these constellations.

Author(s): Paul Felice"

"Title: Establishing A Grainsize Sample Processing Method: Isolating Clastic Grains and Removing Evaporite Minerals to Enable Paleo-environmental Interpretations

Abstract: Grainsize analysis can be used to make paleo-environmental inferences as particle size distributions are dependent on the type of depositional environment and transport process. Specifically, grainsize analysis of the clastic sediment fraction from ephemeral lake cores can aid paleo-climate interpretations of hydrological balances because the geologic processes that govern lake sediment deposition during lake expansion (deep water environments) and contractions (shallow to dry lake conditions) filter different grain sizes. However, one complication that arises when working with sediment from evaporate basins is the high concentration of evaporite deposits that can be left behind as water level drops. These evaporite minerals (e.g. halite, gypsum, anhydrite, etc.) are of little value for grainsize analysis because they reflect crystallization history and may not reflect depositional energy or paleo-transport conditions. Moreover, evaporite minerals form in situ and encapsulate the clastic material of interest—which indicate transport to and within the lake, as well as depositional environment. Thus, evaporite minerals should be removed to isolate the clastic materials. To do this, we built upon standardized grainsize pretreatment methods which remove organics with hydrogen peroxide, biogenic silica with sodium bicarbonate, and by adding some additional steps (acidic baths and DI rinses) to eliminate the evaporites minerals while retaining the clastic sediments. We verified our new methodology using a series of experiments and with SEM & EDs, XRD, and grainsize analysis using a coulter LS-13 230. Sediment samples come from core samples collected at Searles Lake, CA—a location where we plan to develop a record of lake expansion and contraction in the future. It appears that our method not only eradicates the evaporites, but also preserves the grainsizes of the clastic materials.

Author(s): Mary Sorensen, Becky Nesel, and Justin Stroup"

"Title: Can drone imagery be used to produce 3D models for erosion analysis?: An experiment at McIntyre’s Bluff, Sterling, NY

Abstract: Focused erosion along the southern edge of Lake Ontario has dissected drumlins left behind as glaciers melted at the end of the Wisconsinan Stage of the Laurentide glaciation (~10 Ka). McIntyre’s Bluffs in Sterling, NY, contains several exposures of dissected drumlins whose eroded till, sand, and gravel produces steep faces, rivulets, and spires. The degree of erosion along these bluffs is dictated by wave action, precipitation, ice, and groundwater, and can vary considerably over distances of less than several hundred yards. While repeat visits to the bluffs indicate continued erosion at a rate noticeable with a simple visual inspection, a more exact and detailed method is necessary to quantify the rate of change. Although ground-based LiDAR has been shown to accurately determine modern erosion rates, LiDAR instrumentation can be difficult to use and data collection is very expensive. In this study, we demonstrate that imagery collected from a DJI Phantom drone can be used to create 3D models of a bluff face in order to document erosional changes at the bluff over time. Drone video and image data were collected at a portion of McIntyre’s Bluffs each month, from September to December 2018, and from January to March 2019. Waypoints were established to create a drone flight route along the face of the bluff. This ensured that all videos recorded over the course of the study were similar in total elapsed time, and that imagery was collected over the same path. Image frames were extracted from drone videos in AGI Photoscan and, in combination with individual photos collected from regular cameras, were used to generate a point cloud, a mesh, and finally a texturized 3D model of the bluff surface. 3D models created for each month of data collection were imported into ArcGIS, and differenced. Differenced images provide both a qualitative and quantitative measure of erosion rate on the bluff surface. This study has provided a proof-of-concept for easily and inexpensively generating 3D models over short time scales to track rapid erosional changes.

Author(s): Natalie Torres, Rachel Lee, Richard Frieman, and Brian Hough"

"Title: Magnetic anomaly and susceptibility analysis of ore bodies in the western Hudson Highlands, New York

Abstract: Five abandoned mines are present within a northeast striking dextral shear zone in the Western Hudson Highlands, Harriman State Park, NY. Hogen Camp Mine and Bradley Mine are the two end members of this dextral shear zone. Varying bedrock was observed at the two localities; to understand the diverse geology between the two mines, both a magnetic and petrological analysis were conducted. A high precision Overhauser magnetometer and gradiometer were used to discern the magnetic field anomaly (nT) deviations locally and between localities. To assess precision of the magnetic field anomaly, magnetic susceptibility of surrounding wall rock, and of the transition from wall rock to massive ore was quantified. A petrological analysis was then adopted to ascertain the formation and composition of the massive ore deposits within the fractures produced by the dextral shearing. At Hogen Camp Mine, layers of mafic and intermediate metavolcanic gneiss were observed, with local calc-silicate gneiss. The mafic layers of metavolcanic gneiss are supersaturated in iron, which was conclusively determined by mineralogy and concentration of iron oxides. The massive ore deposit is primarily clinopyroxene and magnetite with minor constituents of amphibole and biotite. At Bradley Mine, surrounding quartzofeldspathic gneiss and calc-silicate gneiss were observed. The massive ore deposit is primarily composed of magnetite, clinopyroxene, and calcite. It is interesting to note that the country rock present at these two mines are responsible for the variance in the magnetic field anomaly. Hogen Camp Mine has an overall higher magnetic field anomaly, which is in direct correlation to the surrounding metavolcanic gneiss. Comparatively, Bradley Mine has a lower magnetic field anomaly, ultimately produced by the calc-silicate gneiss.

Author(s): Michael Kensell, Caitlin Serowik, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: Applying Fitts’ law to a self-organized limbs function generalized by experience

Abstract: Fitts’ law is frequently used to describe human movement in terms of a speed and accuracy tradeoff. The widespread empirical success of this formula illustrates a basic principle of human motor control.  There have been previous attempts to relate Fitts’ law to tool use, exploring the cognitive principles underlying pointing movement and whether such knowledge can be generalized across tasks. This study investigates the patterns of amplitude variability in motor movements in the use of chopsticks and tweezers by expert and novice users in an attempt to explore how Fitts’ law extends to pointing tools. We anticipate that expert chopsticks users display a more stable variability in their movement amplitudes, while novice users show a more diverse pattern of variability, with tweezers serving as a baseline measure. These differences suggest that the structure of self-organization in human movement is heavily influenced by prior experience.

Author(s): Wesley Xu, Theo Rhodes"

"Title: Grain Size Analysis of Sediment Core Samples from Searles Lake, California: Steps Toward Interpreting Lake Expansion and Contraction in the Desert Southwest

Abstract: Extreme drought in southern California has the potential to impact ecosystems and millions of people, but the climate mechanisms that control regional water availability are poorly understood. It is important to understand the causes of extreme droughts so they can be better predicted in the future. This is challenging because of complicated physical relationships within the climate system and because of a combination of natural and anthropogenic causes. One way to determine past climate events is through the use of lake sediment cores. The sediment that accumulates in lakes is sensitive to water availability. Grain size analysis can indicate changes in lake levels because clay deposition is often a result of deep water and silts and sands indicate shallower water or dried up lake floor where sediment can be blown across the lake bed or transported by small ephemeral streams. Together, these processes provide a physical link between sediment grain size and past lake water balances. One such lake that contains an amazing history is Searles Lake, located in southern California. The lake sediments contain alternating mud and evaporite layers which correspond to wetter and dryer conditions at Searles Lake over the last ~150,000 years. Today, the lake is mostly evaporated. Here, we examine the grain sizes of samples from mud and evaporite layers from drill cuttings between the interval of 350 feet to 440 feet to examine the correspondence of grain size and physical stratigraphy. Our initial grain size analysis of mostly evaporites, interpreted as dryer climate, show higher percentages of larger grain sizes compared to the mud samples, mostly clays which correspond with deeper lake conditions. The grain size analysis from Searles Lake provides an initial framework for further study of the cycles of drought in the desert southwest.

Author(s): Becky Nesel, Mary Sorensen, Justin Stroup"

"Title: Frequency Linearization Technique Using Fabry-Perot Interferometer

Abstract: External-cavity diode lasers (ECDL) are widely used in spectroscopy applications. These applications typically require precise and smooth single-mode wavelength scanning of the laser for a period of time. In ECDL, wavelength scanning is achieved by changing the grating angle via piezoelectric transducer. However, due to the hysteretic behavior of piezoelectric devices the scanning wavelengths is not proportional to the applied linear voltage and results in a changing wavelength that is non-linear in nature. Here, we present a procedure to linearize such a wavelength scan using a Fabry-Perot interferometer.

Author(s): Andres Inga and

 P. M. Rupsinghe"

"Title: Developing Epigenetic Capabilities at SUNY Oswego

Abstract: Epigenetics is the study of inheritable DNA modifications that may alter gene expression. DNA methylation is one type of epigenetic modification that may induce or silence the expression of genes. The methylation of specific genes may be influenced by an individual’s environment. We propose to study epigenetics regarding genes related to violent behavior and social environment MAOA, COMT, 5HTTLPR, DAT1, DRD2, and DRD4. The degree of methylation coupled with the level of gene expression will allow us to assess epigenetic differences. The purpose of this project is to develop a reliable procedure to measure gene methylation and expression for specific gene regions in saliva. Preliminary results on DNA and RNA purification to be used in downstream methods of methylation-specific PCR and qRT-PCR will be presented.

Author(s): Christina Li"

"Title: "New Directions in History: A Selection of 2018-2019 History Capstone Projects"

Abstract: Elias Cerussi "The Incorporation of Violence during the Rise of the Bolsheviks, 1917-1921."

Connor Breese "Trying to Steer a New Course: Democracy and Reform under the Russian Provisional Government in 1917."

Rose Small "The Rhetoric of Yellow Fever in 19th century New Orleans."

Lauren Nevil "Talking to the Dead: 19th-century Spiritualism in the eastern United States."

Raymond Theiss:  "Unexpected Connections and Defining Modernity: Exploring Three Eras of Japanese History.”

Nicole Dempsey "Understanding the Ritual Practices of the Ancient Mayan Civilization through New Historical Methods."

Author(s): Lyn Blanchfield"

"Title: Subsurface Profiling using Electromagnetic Induction

Abstract: Electromagnetic induction instruments are practical pieces of equipment for many geologic, environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. They are especially imperative to any researcher interested in shallow, subsurface geology. In this project, an electromagnetic profiler (EMP) is used. Specifically, the GSSI Profiler EMP-400. The EMP features two coils, a transmitter and a receiver. It induces a magnetic field using variable frequencies (1-16 kHz), and collects information about the objects and structures in the magnetic field, like apparent conductivity and magnetic susceptibility. This data is directly correlated with location, using a seperate GPS connected to the EMP through bluetooth. After collection, the data can be used to generate a map visualization of the survey area, and underground features and structures can be identified, which is this project’s objective. The EMP will be used to create an electromagnetic profile (hence its namesake) of a promising outlined survey area. The EMP will be walked over the survey area in a grid pattern, with paths made approximately one meter apart to collect an initial set of data. Then, apparent points of interest, such as structures or underground objects detected within the survey area will be scanned again with the EMP in a sweeping pattern to get more thorough results. With computer software, this data will be used to create a subsurface profile detailing underground features in the survey area.

Author(s): Evan Rafferty, Sponsor:  David W. Valentino"

"Title: Anthropology Capstone Presentations: Part II

Abstract: Elaina Kline - Domestication of Cats

Cats are one of the most common form of pet in households today.  They are an important part of the everyday lives of humans.  However, not much is known about how cats got to where they are today.  I will explore the first domesticated cats and their most likely relationship to humans.  Many believe that the first cats were found in Egypt.  There is new evidence of cats being found on an island in the Mediterranean Sea, Cyprus.  In order to determine how cats have gained popularity and have changed over time, we must first look at where they were found first.  Through archaeological and cultural evidence, it will be possible to determine how cats became a part of the lives of humans.

Medgine Mede - The Environmental Effects from Body Farms

I will have three questions concerning decomposition of the bodies in body farms. How do the different types of weather affect the decomposition process, based on body composition? How does the body fluids affect the soil (environment) and the living organisms (bugs)? Is there a different effect on the decomposition based on the person’s health (diseases)?

Ralph Schloss - The Utility of Serrated versus Non-serrated Points of the Hohokam

During the Sedentary Period (circa AD 1000 to 1200) the Hohokam of the Southwest developed a unique form of projectile point. This point was deeply serrated and somewhat resembled a Christmas tree. I will be studying a collection of these points at the Arizona State Museum to collect enough data to prove my hypothesis that these projectile points must serve a special purpose or were more efficient than the non-serrated points of that time. I will also use modern replicas for hands on test and for use in the Anthropology department’s collection of artifacts.

Rose Small - The Intersectionality of New York City Health Campaigns and At-risk Populations

New York City is one of the most populated cites in the world, which means that the health department there must be equipped to handle an assortment of diseases. Public health campaigns educated residents so that they can better deal with a variety of issues, including influenzas. The flu is often highly contagious, although vaccines can be used to prevent it. Those with asthma are at risk of both contracting the flue and encountering severe complications. This is a problem in New York city where air quality conditions have led to an increased number of the population, specifically low-income African-American families, to be diagnosed with asthma. So, how does NYC’s Health Department’s public health campaigns for influenzas intersect with at-risk populations? An analysis of both the material given to the public as well as the department’s demographic data will be conducted. This will be used to examine how at-risk populations are addressed and how the information given to them differs from that given to other groups. Preliminary research would suggest that although campaigns for asthma and influenza are two of the largest run by the department, there is little overlap between the two.

Author(s): Elaina Kline, Medgine Mede, Ralph Schloss, Rose Small"

"Title: Does compliment type influence cognitive performance and mood in women?

Abstract: Does the type of compliment received before taking a cognitive performance test influence cognitive performance and mood?  This research is designed to observe women’s performance on a cognitive test after receiving either appearance or competence compliments. The effect on mood will be measured in both participant groups. We expect that appearance compliments will reduce cognitive performance but will improve mood. Competence compliments will demonstrate opposite effects, showing higher scores on the cognitive performance test with a lower mood prior to receiving test scores. This study will follow up on the research by Tiggemann and Boundy, 2008 who used environmental cues and compliments to find an association with cognitive performance, mood, self-objectification, and body shame.

Author(s): Brighton Bernard, Gilian Tenbergen"

"Title: Dispersive Liquid Liquid Microextraction of Diphenhydramine and its Metabolites from Aqueous Solutions

Abstract: Diphenhydramine (DPH) is an over-the-counter antihistamine which has been reported to be used as a date-rape-drug. Due to the high potency and short half-life of DPH, methods that can detect DPH and its metabolites in urine at low levels are required. In this work a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method is developed for extraction of DPH and its metabolite from aqueous solutions. Gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detector (GC-FID) is used for instrumental analysis. Aqueous solutions of DPH and its metabolite were prepared in 0.1- 2.0 ug/mL range. The aqueous solutions were buffered with 2 M NaOH and were spiked with a mixture of 1000 uL of acetonitrile and 325 uL of toluene. The solution was centrifuged for 5 min and the top toluene layer was removed, measured, transferred to a clean vial and analyzed with GC-FID. The calibration standard solutions of DPH and its metabolite were prepared in 5-100 ug/mL range and analyzed with GC-FID.  A linear calibration graph (r^2 = 0.99) was produced, which was used to determine the concentration of DPH and its metabolite in the extraction phase. The extraction recoveries and enrichment factors were calculated.

Author(s): Sierra Andrews, Alexis Smith"

"Title: Race, Hair Cortisol, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in the Syracuse Lead Study Participants

Abstract: Cortisol is a biomarker for stress, which can be influenced by many factors affecting long-term stress. N=232 hair samples from the Syracuse Lead Study were sent to SUNY Oswego, which were then washed, dried, cut, weighed, the cortisol extracted, and ELISA analysis of extracted cortisol was completed. It has been found that hair cortisol is a mediator between race and carotid intima-media thickness, a measure used to diagnose the extent of carotid atherosclerotic vascular disease, in children. While associations of race and cardiovascular problems and race and hair cortisol are well-known in the field, we are first to document such associations in children and first to show mediation via hair cortisol

Author(s): Laura Thacker"

"Title: Geometry Optimization and Electron Density Mapping of Picolinamide Derivatives

Abstract: Computational chemistry is at the forefront of industrial and theoretical quantum mechanic applications. The ability to perform and simulate chemical reactions under varying conditions are beneficial to manufacturing companies due to the low cost and hazards. Predicting yields through ab initio methods allow chemist to view the stability of bonds, the transition of electron density, and HOMO/LUMO gap. Computational chemistry can be applied to establish the energy differences between organic ligands and the prospective yield. The strength of the bond is important in Ullmann coupling which uses copper to perform an aryl-aryl bond. Ullmann coupling uses a large amount of copper and a high temperature to create its product which is not beneficial in industrial settings. Several picolinamide derivatives were used to increase the yield of Ullmann coupling. Through the use of electronic package GAMESS, DFT theory was used to optimize the geometry of the ligands. DFT was then supported with various independent functionals such as B3LYP, BLYP, and PBE. An effective functional was chosen along with efficiency and computational power. The energy differences were then examined and compared to the yield percentages obtained through experimentation.

Author(s): Hector Gomez"

"Title: Expression and Purification of Complement Proteins CFH and C2 for Use in Protein Interaction Studies

Abstract: Complement is a system of plasma proteins that can be activated directly by pathogens or indirectly by pathogen-bound antibody, leading to a cascade of reactions generating active components with various effector functions. My research project aims to gain a molecular-level understanding of the proteininteractions that regulate complement. I focused my project on studying complement factor H (CFH), which is a known regulator of complement component 3 (C3). CFH is a 150-kDa plasma glycoprotein made up of 20 globular complement control protein (CCP) modules, where domains 1-4 maintain regulatory activity. My lab has been able to successfully express the full length CFH in Pichia pastoris and purify it for use in interaction studies with C3 and thrombomodulin, a suspected regulator. To investigate complement activation, I have also focused on expression and purification of complement component 2 (C2), a multi-domain serine protease, which forms the C3 convertase activation complex when bound to complement component 4 (C4). My goal has been to express C2 in E. coli and to purify it for use in activation of C3 (both C3 and C4 are available in the lab). Future experiments will include the study of various protein complexes by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS).

Author(s): Veronica Singh"

"Title: Interactions Between Thrombomodulin and The Complement System by Surface Plasmon Resonance

Abstract: Complement component 3 (C3) is at the junction of three different complement activation pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative). Activation to C3b is a key step in the innate immune response that allows for the formation of important multi-protein complexes that ultimately participate in pathogen clearance. When misregulated, however, complement can lead to inflammatory disease and autoimmune disorders. Several regulatory proteins for C3b are known, but the molecular details of interactions between these proteins have not yet been elucidated. Thrombomodulin (TM), and specifically its N-terminal lectin-like domain (TMD1), has been identified as a possible regulator of complement through interactions with C3 or C3b, and the known regulator CFH may also be required. We have used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to study the interaction of TMD1 with C3 and C3b. Using SPR, we see that C3 binds to a surface coated with TMD1, and full kinetic studies are underway.

Author(s): Jose Giler"

"Title: Perception of argument under violations of film continuity

Abstract: Classic hollywood narratives (and most other medium/big budget movies) typically occur on one side of what filmmakers call an “action line”. This is an imaginary line connecting the actors and their joint choreography; according to the well-known 180-degree rule, nothing is to be shot across this line. It is widely acknowledged among filmmakers everywhere that the breakage of this rule can result in disorientation and confusion by audience members. Certain filmmakers have utilized this effect to purposely disorient their audience, in an effort to alter their perspectives in a subtle, spatial-based manner. Argument research has suggested gaze differences in people watching arguments, based on whether the argument tackled a generally mixed view or dominant view. There has been some debate, however, regarding whether these findings suggest understanding or agreement. In the current investigation, participants were asked to watch videos on a screen tackling arguments (either mixed or dominant) while wearing an eye tracker. Moreover, each video fell into either a “normal” 180-degree abiding condition, or a 180-degree break condition. Gaze lag between each argument topic and spatial continuity (or lack thereof) was assessed, as well as the perspectives on each topic prior to the video/afterwards.

Author(s): Hannah Gonzalez, Theo Rhodes"

"Title: The Effects of Cell Phone Presence and Motivation on Student Performance

Abstract: Cell phones are a constant distraction in classrooms today. Research has shown that cell phone distractions during class can damage students’ academic outcomes. For example, a cell phone ring in class has the effect of diverting students’ attention and decreasing retention of the material being presented. Cell phone use in class has also been found to be negatively correlated with GPA. Furthermore, the mere presence of a cell phone reduces cognitive performance on a number of measures including working memory and fluid intelligence. The present research seeks to describe the relationships between cell phone use, motivation, and academic performance, and determine the exact cognitive domains which are impacted by cell

phone presence. Information from this study can be used to inform class policies to maximize academic performance, and to develop future research on relationships between cell phone location and use and performance in other areas such as work or social engagement. This study has two phases, survey and experimental. For the survey phase, participants (N=58) completed a survey assessing academic motivation, cell phone use, and academic performance. Academic motivation was measured using a modified Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, which consisted of 44 Likert Scale items (e.g. “I think that what I am learning in this class is useful for me to know”). Participants were also asked to self-report on

cell phone usage habits in class and in general (e.g. “About how many texts or similar messages do you send per class?”), and on course grade in a psychology breadth course for Fall 2018. For the experimental phase, participants will complete the CANTAB Core Cognition Battery, a series of electronic tasks which provide measures of reaction time, visual episodic memory, spatial working memory, and sustained attention. During this task, the location of the participant’s cell phone will be manipulated. The first experimental group will be instructed to place their phone on their desk during the assessment, the second group will have the phone in their pocket or bag, and the third will be instructed to leave all belongings (including cell phone) in the other room. For the survey phase (N=58), it is expected that high cell phone usage in class will predict a lower course grade, but only for students with low academic motivation. Furthermore, it is expected that students high in academic motivation will have a higher course grade and report lower rates of cell phone usage in class than those low in academic motivation. For the experimental phase, it is hypothesized that participants in the groups with the phone on their desk or in their pocket or bag will have lower scores in all four cognitive domains (reaction time, spatial working memory, visual episodic memory, and sustained attention) than those in the group with their phone in the other room.

Author(s): Peter Mancarella, Emily Bovier"

"Title: Employment and Literary Critique

Abstract: Can a man be a nurse? How can a young retail employee claim her rights when she is working off the books? Members of the English honor society explore favorite works of poetry and fiction that have influenced their thinking, and show how the practice of literary critique empowers them to name and confront the myths and contradictions that surround the search for a meaningful career.

Author(s): Ashley Brunache, Angela Lee, Natasia Burgess, Jenna Uryevick"

"Title: Employment and Literary Critique

Abstract: Can a man be a nurse? How can a young retail employee claim her rights when she is working off the books? Members of the English honor society explore favorite works of poetry and fiction that have influenced their thinking, and show how the practice of literary critique empowers them to name and confront the myths and contradictions that surround the search for a meaningful career.

Author(s): Ashley Brunache, Angela Lee, Natasia Burgess, Jenna Uryevick"

"Title: Employment and Literary Critique

Abstract: Can a man be a nurse? How can a young retail employee claim her rights when she is working off the books? Members of the English honor society explore favorite works of poetry and fiction that have influenced their thinking, and show how the practice of literary critique empowers them to name and confront the myths and contradictions that surround the search for a meaningful career.

Author(s): Ashley Brunache, Angela Lee, Jenna Uryevick, Natasha Burgess"

"Title: Branding and Culture of Companies

Abstract: Branding and Culture of Companies

Author(s): Marie Aloi, Christopher Clappin, Tess Conley"

"Title: Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata) Population Analysis and Headstarting Efficiency at Ira Marsh in Cayuga County, NY.

Abstract: Between 1988 and 1991, 40 Spotted Turtle headstarters from Burnett Park Zoo were released into Ira marsh in order to determine the effects headstarting has on turtle populations. This site has been periodically surveyed to obtain an analysis of the population as well as determine the effects of headstarting. Our project consisted of hand capturing native spotted turtles in Ira Marsh in order to garner a population estimate, as well as gain insight on the lifestyle and habits of this population through radio telemetry.

Author(s): Matthew Gorman, Kasey Barber, Kaitlyn Talmage"

"Title: The Potential Impacts of "Block System" Policy Initiative on Chinese Communities

Abstract: Based on a historical review of Chinese community governance, this presentation will first explore the milieu of an emerging community governance policy initiative started in 2016. That is the "block system" whose landmark measure is interpreted to demolish the established walls around the residential areas. Then, this presentation is to shed light on the implication or potential impacts of this policy on Chinese communities, especially through certain case studies. Despite a series of benefits propagandized with this effort, the side effects have to be taken into consideration as well, such as the encroachment of private rights, the threats over individuals' safety and the defect policy although in the name of public good. So the current pause of this policy turns out rational and necessary. What is more, this presentation attempts to offer more realistic approaches to better community governance in China.

Author(s): Chaoliang Jing"

"Title: Using Assistive Technology to Level the Playing Field

Abstract: Assistive technology helps "level the playing field" for students with disabilities. Dr. Amanda Fenlon, Associate Professor of Special Education, will share the work of her graduate students with 3 action research case studies of powerful teaching combined with specific assistive technology tools that substantially improved the writing skills of public school students with disabilities.

Author(s): Dr. Amanda Fenlon, Marisa-Marie Conslato, Megan Russell"

"Title: Radiation Hydrodynamic Modelling of Cepheid Variable Stars

Abstract: As part of a class AST 405 project, we use the latest version of MESA/RSP to model a number of OGLE Large Magellanic Cloud Cepheid Variable Stars. We describe the code, its implementation on the Astrophysics cluster, the success/failure of our modelling and the astrophysical implications.

Author(s): Brett Meerdink,

 Nick Proietti,

 Samantha Carey,

 Ryan Mammone,

 Natalie Miller,

 Katherine Galey,

 Paul Felice

 Kari Henry

 AJ Chalmers

 Antonella Pelosi

Shashi Kanbur"

"Title: Art and Design Showcase

Abstract: Art 417 Print to Screen. Kim Grunden, Courtney Hall, and Dalton Patterson. Rebecca Mushtare sponsor.

Recollection Project. Julie Farquhar and Hannah Sojka. Rebecca Mushtare sponsor.

Virtual Reality Lab Independent Study Project. Bradley Holen, Zack Jocz, Jia Fu Liu, Pragya Pahari, Ian Suanders, and Abhishek Thapa. Cara Thompson sponsor.

Photography. Sarah Smelko. Julieve Jubin sponsor.

Painting. Ariana Dzibela, and Shea McCarthy. Christopher McEvoy sponsor.  

Ceramics. Mikayla Trapasso. Renqian Yang sponsor.

ART 347 Puppets and Performing Objects: Ugly Puppets. Performers: Nyiah Bagnall, Nathaniel Canfield, Maria Derenzo, Hannah Deutsch, Kassandra Edwards, Jacklyn Lopez, Paul Phipps, Jacob Sweeney, Christopher Weiman, and Jessica Miller.

Benjamin Entner sponsor.

Independent Study: Allegory and the Female Form. Catalina Penailillo. Benjamin Entner sponsor.

Author(s): Kim Grunden, Courtney Hall, Dalton Patterson, Rebecca Mushtare, Julie Farquhar, Hannah Sojka, Bradley Holen, Zack Jocz, Jia Fu Liu, Pragya Pahari, Ian Suanders, Abhishek Thapa, Cara Thompson, Sarah Smelko, Julieve Jubin, Ariana Dzibela, Shea McCarthy. Christopher McEvoy, Mikayla Trapasso. Renqian Yang, Nyiah Bagnall, Nathaniel Canfield, Maria Derenzo, Hannah Deutsch, Kassandra Edwards, Jacklyn Lopez, Paul Phipps, Jacob Sweeney, Christopher Weiman, Jessica Miller, Benjamin Entner, Catalina Penailillo"

"Title: Computer Science Session 2

Abstract: Anne Reynolds, Kristen Ray, Kushboo Panchal - Virtual Mindfulness: Using Virtual Reality to Induce a State of Mindfulness

James Spagnola, Bastian Tenbergen - Building a cm-Precise Cyber-Physical Drone using Differential GPS

Andrew Driscoll, Bastian Tenbergen - AirborneCPS: Implementing Autonomous Flight Manuevors to Avoid Collisions

Author(s): Anne Reynolds, Kristen Ray, Kushboo Panchal, James Spagnola, Andrew Driscoll, Bastian Tenbergen"

"Title: SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN IN INDIA

Abstract: An analysis of existing research surrounding violence against women in India post 2012, aiming to understand the cause, consequences and implementation of policies within the criminal justice system to address this pressing issue.

Author(s): Sonali Kumar"

"Title: Gait as a Predictor of Sexual Violence Victimization

Abstract: About 50% of women who have been sexually assaulted are revictimized (Relyea & Ullman, 2017). Commonly associated risk factors for revictimization include disinhibited alcohol consumption (Ullman, Relvea, Peter-Hagene, & Vasquez, 2013) and the presence of emotional dysregulation (Walsh, DiLillo, and Messman-Moore, 2012). The regulation of emotion appears to be negatively impacted by exposure to sexual trauma (New et al., 2009) and may be perceived through a victim’s appearance (Daros, Ruocco, & Rule, 2016). Men who measure high on Factor 1 psychopathic traits have been shown to accurately discern women with and without a history of victimization by viewing video recordings of women’s gait only, and rating them on vulnerability (Wheeler, Book, & Costello, 2009). Men who were incarcerated for at least one violent offense were shown to not only accurately discern women through cues of vulnerability, but additionally explain that gait characteristics influenced their answers (Book, Costello, & Camilleri, 2013). Women with a history of sexual assault may view themselves and others differently than those without a history due to cognitive schema disruption following exposure to

sexual trauma (Wright, Collinsworth, & Fitzgerald, 2010). Findings have shown possible perceptual differences among women when compared by both sexual assault victimization history and emotion regulation. These findings have been examined through both verbal (Walsh et al., 2012) and nonverbal cues of risk (Melkonian, Ham, Bridges, & Fugitt, 2017). However, it is unknown how women may perceive other women’s vulnerability through gait. This study is a replication and extension of Wheeler et al. (2009). It is hypothesized that women with a history of sexual assault will be more accurate in perceiving vulnerability cues associated with a history of sexual violence. It is also hypothesized that alcohol consumption will be a predictor of a positive sexual assault history. 47 SUNY Oswego female undergraduate students participated in

Study 1 to collect video stimuli. Using a miniature hidden camera placed in the hallway, participants were briefly recorded from behind upon entering the lab. Participants also completed a survey to determine a history of sexual violence. Surveys were placed in a drop box to maintain total confidentiality. Videos were edited and any identifying information including facial features were blurred. Women who participated in Study 1, were not eligible to participate in Study 2. During Study 2 (ongoing), participants complete a demographics questionnaire, Alcohol Consumption Survey, Self-Esteem Measure, and Sexual-Self Schema Scale. Participants also complete the Sexual Coercion Scale to determine a history of sexual assault. Participants then review all of the videos from the Study 1, and rate each video on a vulnerability scale and describe what factors influenced each answer. Data analysis is currently ongoing. If the main hypothesis is supported, it will suggest that women may be aware of general-post victimization changes, but not the specific role of gait. Therefore, further contributing to the understanding of revictimization factors, and indicating a possible need for gait education implementation to improve prevention and treatment efforts.

Author(s): Bryce Colvin, Gilian Tenbergen"

"Title: Sun Tracking Solar Power System

Abstract: A sun tracking system based on photosensors is designed and implemented onto a solar panel to capture more energy. The performance of the sun-tracking solar panel will also be demonstrated in comparison to fixed solar panels.

Author(s): Aitor Celaya, and Alex Chambers

Faculty Advisor: Hui Zhang"

"Title: Red: A Play Reading

Abstract: A staged reading of the play 'Red' by John Logan, co-presented between the Theatre Department and the English and Creative Writing Department.

Author(s): Toby Malone, Brad Korbesmeyer"

"Title: Make Me Proud: A Play Reading

Abstract: A reading of a new student-written play, 'Make Me Proud', based on Donne's 'Death Be Not Proud'. A reading featuring Kayla Elfers and Anastasia West.

Author(s): Kayla Elfers"

"Title: Smaller This Year: A Play Reading

Abstract: A reading of a new play, 'Smaller This Year', by Anastasia West and William Reymann.

Author(s): Anastasia West"

"Title: 'The Shape of Things' Dramaturgy Hub

Abstract: A presentation of the dramaturgical research and achievements of the team of dramaturgs from 'The Shape of Things'.

Author(s): Ryan Benson Smith"

"Title: Effects of the Internet on Cruising Culture in Homosexual Men

Abstract: A presentation of in-depth dramaturgical research created for the Theatre Department's production of Fun Home.

Author(s): Ryan Benson Smith"

"Title: Ladders (and How to Climb Them)

Abstract: A podcast series a that explores this idea of the uncertainty of being successful through various interviews with people that are confident in having found success in their lives. The goal of this project is to guide students in their search for what being successful means to them.

Author(s): Ethan Magram"

"Title: Current Issues in Media Law

Abstract: A panel of four recent Mass Media & the Law students will present their research on important topics shaping communication law in 2019.

Author(s): Selena Pappas, Cameron Slavin, Samantha Smolak, Brigette Wagner"

"Title: Engaging Images: Measuring Student Organization Use of Instagram and Lessons Learned from Best Practices

Abstract: A group of students who are social media interns researched student organizations’ use of social media channels, particularly Instagram, to see who was using this medium effectively and what other student orgs and any users can learn from the most successful.

Author(s): Anna Chichester, Kayla Adam, Sam Donnelly, Luzelena Cespedes, Kendall Padovani, Abigayle Shaw"

"Title: The Good Dramaturg: ’The Good Doctor’ Through the Eyes of a Dramaturg

Abstract: A fifteen minute presentation on the Dramaturgical research done on the 2019 Blackfriars Student Honors Production of Neil Simon’s ’The Good Doctor.'

Author(s): Kiersten Mickle"

"Title: Three-Minute Thesis

Abstract: A competition that celebrates the exciting research conducted by graduate students at SUNY Oswego. This competition cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and communication skills. The competition supports students' capacity to effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

Author(s): "

"Title: Business Etiquete in the United States VS China

Abstract: A comparison of how to go about doing business in the United States compared to China. Going from initial relationships, greetings, and how to communicate and act during the business meeting

Author(s): Stephen Giannotta"

"Title: Creative Collaboration Between Lighting and Projection Media

Abstract: A brief presentation combining audio, lighting, and media elements tethered using Open Sound Control and Midi Time Code.

Author(s): Patrick Mathis, Devin Croad, Greg West, Gregory Brewster"

"Title: MAT 401: Mathemagica

Abstract: "Fibonacci and Coin Tossing Probabilities" by Kendra Walker

The Fibonacci sequence is found in obscure places from nature to aesthetics to gambling, whether directly or in relation to the Golden Ratio. This sequence’s contribution to the explanations of natural phenomena have made lasting impacts on mathematics. A scenario in which we toss a coin until we have 2 consecutive heads results in a probability distribution containing Fibonacci numbers in its numerator. We will explain the probability for a sequence of n spaces and with specific place holders, called strings, of heads and tails patterns. Also, we will explore formulas to explicitly and mathematically provide reasoning for the appearance of the Fibonacci numbers, and even extend the scenario to 3 consecutive heads to look for patterns. Exploring the expected value, variance, skewness, kurtosis, and moment generating functions for both the 2 consecutive heads scenario and the 3 consecutive heads scenario will give us some insight on the distributions’ characteristics.

"The Hidden Information in Infinite Series Arising from Graphs" by Juliann Geraci

Letting h_n denote the number of walks of length n in a directed graph G, we study the infinite sequence of numbers h = (h_0, h_1, h_2, . . .), and how properties of G are encoded in its growth. To extract information from h, we will study its generating function H(t), which is the power series with terms of the form (h_n)t^n. We will show that H(t) coincides with a rational function f(t), and that properties of G (e.g., the number and lengths of oriented cycles in G) influence the form of f(t).

Author(s): Kendra Walker, Juliann Geraci"

"Title: MAT 402: Mathemagica

Abstract: "Differential Topology" by Ryan Gelnett

Differential Topology studies the shapes of smooth curves, surfaces, and their higher dimensional cousins by using tools from calculus like derivatives and integrals. In this talk, we will discuss the basic objects studied in differential topology and how they generalize the familiar objects encountered in a calculus course.

"Constructing the Heptadecagon" by Kyler Anderson

Can you draw a triangle? How about a square? Can you make them perfect? How about a pentagon? In mathematics,

and geometry particularly, constructions are a way of drawing things with mathematical precision, using a straightedge and

compass. It comes as no surprise that we can draw a regular triangle and square, but we can also make a regular pentagon

and hexagon; the ancient Greeks knew that much. If you can draw a square, you can imagine splitting the sides in half to

make an octagon. For over a thousand years after the Greeks, that’s all we thought we could do: 3,4,5, and 6 sides, and any

doubling of those. Imagine the surprise of everyone (mathematicians mostly) when Gauss, at only 19 years old, proved we

could construct a regular 17-sided polygon. And when Erchinger, shortly later, found an actual construction, Gauss returned

the excitement. The excitement would last for scores of years and many more proofs would be found for constructing the

heptadecagon. Here we explore a particularly elegant one from Richmond, which employs, in its depths, trigonometry, de

Moivre’s Theorem, and some clever algebra.

Author(s): Ryan Gelnett, Kyler Anderson"