Visit Us

The best way to experience our friendly, learner-centered community is to visit.

Intro video

One video, 60 seconds, countless reasons to consider SUNY Oswego.

Student Life Featured Image
Get involved

Explore our nearly 200 clubs and organizations that can forge connections and create opportunities.

Alumni Featured Image
Homecoming returns

The first Homecoming in decades will unfold Nov. 14 with a host of spirited activities.

News and Events Featured Image
Oswego rising

Lakeshore college continues climb in ratings, reviews.

You are here

Bonobo Handshake


Bonobo Handshake book coverWoods writes about her journey that took her from Australia to Congo to study bonobos. The book has multiple dimensions that make it an excellent choice for ORI. It is the story of a young woman, Vanessa Woods, who is still trying to find her way and finds it through her work with her fiancé, scientist Brian Hare. It is a story about the civil war–torn Congo and the courage of men and women in that country who are picking up the pieces and moving forward. And, finally, it is a story about this species, bonobos, whose tolerance and intelligence are explained in such accessible terms by Vennesa Woods. The book really brings to light the differences between the bonobos and chimpanzees where the former live in a matriarchal society cooperating and rarely fighting and the later with a male-dominated society with significant violence. We hope you will enjoy the book.

Vanessa Woods is an award winning journalist and author. She has written three children's books; one of her book, It's True! Space Turns You Into Spaghetti, won the Acclaimed Book award from the Royal Society, UK. Vanessa is also the author of the travel memoir It's Every Monkey For Themselves about her experiences chasing wild capuchin monkeys through the Costa Rican jungle. Vanessa is an internationally published journalist and has written for various publications including the Discovery Channel, BBC Wildlife, New Scientist, and Travel Africa. In 2003, Vanessa won the Australasian Science award for journalism. Vanessa is currently a Research Scientist at Duke University and studies the cognitive development of chimpanzees and bonobos at sanctuaries in the Republic of Congo and the Democratic Republic of Congo. 


Talk: What We Can Learn From Our Peaceful Cousins in the Congo
Date: Wednesday, October 5th
Time: 7 pm
Location: Lanigan 101

Bonobo apes share 98.7 percent of our DNA, and may hold the key to what makes humans, well, human. But unlike their cousins, the chimpanzees, not much is known about them; worse, they are the world's most endangered ape, living in the world's most war-torn country.

Against a backdrop of scientific and personal discovery, Vanessa Woods brings us deep into the jungles of the Congo to show us what makes bonobos tick. What can they teach us about community, about harmonious co-existence, and about ourselves? And what is the true meaning of "Bonobo Handshake"? With energy and charm, Woods shares enlightening anecdotes and groundbreaking research, making a powerful case for saving the bonobo, before it's too late.  


Related links