Fiona Coll

Assistant Professor


Contact

315 Marano Campus Center
315.312.2630
fiona.coll@oswego.edu

Office hours

SPRING 2019
Tuesday 4:00 - 5:00
Wednesday 12:00 - 2:00
or by appointment 

Spring 2019 Schedule

Fiona Coll

Fiona Coll is Assistant Professor of Literature and Technology at SUNY Oswego. She is also Editor-in-Chief of The Floating Academy, an online collaboration of scholars who share interests in nineteenth-century literature and culture. Her research focuses on the intersections of literature, science, and technology; she is currently working on a monograph that explores how the automaton, a technological object that gave material form to fantasies of human exceptionalism, emerged as a discursive tool in nineteenth-century writing about the limits of human agency. Coll's published writing includes "'Just a singing-machine': The Making of an Automaton in George du Maurier's Trilby" and "The Victorian Automaton as Imaginary Prosthetic." Coll received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Toronto. 

Classes taught

SPRING 2019 COURSES

ENG 102/720 TR 9:35-10:55 256 Marano CC
ENG 362/800 TR 2:20-3:40 142 Marano CC
ENG 465/800 TR 11:10-12:30 256 Marano CC

ENG 102 COMPOSITION II-This course is designed to develop fundamental writing skills (emphasizing sentence, paragraph, and essay structure as well as standard conventions of citation) in the context of scholarly research and communication.

ENG 362  THEORY, HISTORY, GENRE-In this course, we will explore the concept of genre as a historical, social, and technological phenomenon, taking into consideration issues of production, transmission, and reception of particular texts. That is to say, we will consider the material world of objects, economies, and bodies as it relates to the intellectual world of ideas, metaphor, and imagination. To do this, we will read Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818/1831) as an anchor text to examine how an enduring Gothic classic came to be. We will contrast the print production of popular fiction in the nineteenth century with the digital production of electronic literature in the twentieth and twenty-first in order to ask what work—practical, political, and conceptual—is performed by the concept of genre today. Your work in this class will include written responses to our course material, regular participation in classroom discussion and activity, and the development of a theoretically informed argument about the nature and function of genre.

ENG 465 SEMINAR IN ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES: HUMAN MACHINES-In this senior seminar, we will explore the aesthetic, cultural, and political implications of thinking about the human in machine terms and thinking about machines in human terms. We will read fiction and non-fiction work from the seventeenth century through to the twenty-first in order to understand how literature contributes to the mutual constitution of machinic and human agencies. Your work in this seminar will include written responses to our course material, regular participation in classroom discussion and activities, and the development of a theoretically informed argument about the topic of “Human Machines.”