Degree standards

Measures by Degree Programs reflect accordance to national standards by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD), our national accreditation organization.

BA Degree Goals:

Foundations Goals
Upon completion of foundation courses, students should be able to:
1. Competently employ the elements and principles of design. 
2. Use appropriate vocabulary, including the elements and principles of design and color theory, to discuss and formally analyze visual art and design. 
3. Demonstrate a foundational understanding of intellectual property. 
4. Draw from observation and draw to communicate. 
5. Create imagery using digital tools. 
6. Place creative works within Western art historical context.

Specific to Track I, Studio Art Major
Upon completion of the degree, students should be able to:
1. Basic understanding of elements and principles of design applied through one or more media.
2. The ability to conceive, organize, and produce works of art/design at a competent level. 
3. Some familiarity with the works and intentions of major artists/designers and movements of the past and the present, both in the Western and non-Western.

Specific to Track  II, Art History
Upon completion of the degree, students should be able to:
1. Gain general knowledge of the monuments and principal artists of all major art periods of the past, including a broad understanding of the art of the twentieth century and acquaintance with the art history of global (non-Western) cultures. This knowledge should be augmented by study in greater depth and precision of several cultures and periods in the history of art and concentration in at least one area to the advanced seminar level. Study at the advanced level should include theory, analysis, and criticism.
2. Gain general knowledge of world history.
3. Knowledge of the tools and techniques of scholarship. A record of active research and the writing of analytical and critical essays completed throughout the program and collected in a portfolio of work. 
4. Functional knowledge of the creative process. 
5. Global cultural competency achieved through the study of a foreign language, Collaborative Online International Learning, or Study Abroad.

Specific to Track  III, Graphic Design
Upon completion of the degree, students should be able to:
1. Identify and implement appropriate tools, methods, and strategies to support the design process at all stages, including planning, production, publication, and distribution. 
2. Generate useful and usable visual communications/messages that meet the demands/goals of a creative brief and employ the elements and principles of design, visual organization, and, when appropriate, the principles of motion and interaction.
3. Recommend design solutions that respond to the audience, setting, and context of the design problem.
4. Evaluate the form, function, meaning, and experience of design solutions based on the concepts and principles of design (including motion and interaction when applicable), contemporary practices, and the demands of a creative brief.

Specific to Track IV, Illustration
Upon completion of the degree, students should be able to:
1. Basic understanding of elements and principles of visual art and illustration applied through one or more media.
2. The ability to conceive, organize, and produce works of art/illustration at a competent level.
3. Some familiarity with the works and intentions of major artists/designers and movements of the past and the present, both in the Western and non-Western worlds.

Specific to Track V, Interaction Design
Upon completion of the degree, students should be able to:
1. Identify and implement appropriate tools, methods, and strategies to support the design process at all stages, including planning, production, publication, and distribution. 
2. Generate useful and usable visual communications/messages that meet the demands/goals of a creative brief and employ the elements and principles of design, visual organization, and, when appropriate, the principles of motion and interaction.
3. Recommend interaction solutions that respond to the audience, setting, and context of the design problem.
4. Evaluate the form, function, meaning, and experience of design solution based on the concepts and principles of interaction design (including motion, interaction, sequence, accessibility, and adaptive), contemporary practices, and the demands of a creative brief.

Specific to BFA Studio Art, Track I, Fine Arts 
Upon graduation students must possess:
1. Understanding of elements and principles of design applied through selected media. The ability to conceive, design, and create works in one or more specific fine arts areas. Development of this sensitivity continues throughout the degree program.
2. Ability to examining imaging and illustration practice in relation to scale, proportion, multiples, space, environment as well as visual and intellectual unity. And to exploring perception and dynamic balance using type, shape, image, and grid.
3. Experiences that encourage familiarity with a broad variety of work in various specializations and media, including broad exposure to works of art. 
4. Understanding the similarities, differences, and relationships among the various fine arts areas.
5. Opportunities to develop an area of emphasis in at least one fine arts area. Working knowledge of various aesthetic issues, processes, and media and their relationship to the conceptualization, development, and completion of works of art.

Specific to BFA Studio Art, Track II, Illustration
Upon graduation students must possess:
1. Experiences that encourage familiarity with a broad variety of media including but not limited to drawing, painting, printmaking, and digital media.
2. Ability to apply design principles, color theory, and competency in drawing to work in specific areas of specializations; ability to exploring perception and dynamic balance and the expressive qualities of mark making.
3. Endow virtual forms and spaces with a palpable sense of light and cast shadow and exploring solutions that influence the mood and interpretation of an image.
4. Translate the three-dimensional world onto a two-dimensional surface through observational analysis, form description, and spatial construction.
5. Understanding of how to apply their analyses to the strengths and weaknesses of their work and creating proposals and design briefs for projects
6. Prepare visual projects for a specified reproduction or distribution process.

Specific to BFA Graphic Design
Upon graduation students must possess:
1. Generate useful, usable, effective, and desirable solutions to various visual communication problems that demonstrate fluency in the elements and principles of design, visual organization, typography, the medium/technology, and, when appropriate, principles of motion and interaction.
2. Develop an integrated design practice/process that places value on research, critique/feedback, and iteration during planning and production phases, including the ability to frame design problems in relationship to people and context, use research to make informed and strategic design decisions, implement a combination of divergent and convergent thinking during ideation phases, and develop and test prototypes, etc.
3. Produce design solutions that effectively respond to the relevant context(s) of a design problem, including (but not limited to) the scale/scope of the project, technology, the goals/constraints of the client, needs/values/behaviors of the audience, and cultural, and economic conditions.
4. Evaluate the form, function, meaning, experience, and the short and long-term impact of a design solution based on the concepts and principles of design (including motion and interaction when relevant), contemporary and historical practices, theory, and the demands of a creative brief.
5. Demonstrate functional knowledge of professional business practices and ethics.