EPITAPHS

Anthropology 368
Writing Assignment


You are expected to present an artistic view of your epitaph, you may use calligraphy or computer enhancement instead of typing the expression. It is due by October 2, 1996. NO LATE PAPERS WILL BE ACCEPTED!

 

ASSIGNMENT: You are asked to write your epitaph--an original expression of no more than 25 words, that reflects your view of life and that would be engraved in stone as a marker of your death and life. You will be evaluated on the orginality of the epitaph and the graphical (artistic) form of presentation. The following are by way of example of some past epitaphs:

 

Here lies John McDonald.

Born a man,

Died a grocer.

-- on tombstone in Scotland

 

Stranger, regard this spot with gravity.

Dentist Green's filling his last cavity.

-- Anonymous

 

Here lies a poor woman who was always tired.

She lived in a house where help wasn't hired.

Her last words on earth were "Dear friends, I am going,

To where there's no cooking, or washing, or sewing.

For everything there is exact to my wishes,

For where they don't eat there's no washing of dishes.

I'll be where loud anthems will always be ringing,

But having no voice I'll be quit of the singing.

Don't mourn me now, Don't mourn me never,

I am going to do nothing for ever and ever."

-- Anonymous

 

Here lies my wife, a sad slattern and shrew;

If I said I regretted her, I should lie too.

-- On tombstone in a Yorkshire cemetary

 

THE BODY OF B. FRANKLIN PRINTER,

(Like the cover of an Old Book

Its contents torn out

And stript of its Lettering and Gilding)

Lies here, Food for Worms.

But the work shall not be lost;

For it will, (as he believ'd) appear

once more

In a new and more elegant Edition

Revised and Corrected

By the Author

 

"Remember man that passeth by,

As thou art now so once was I.

And as I am, so thou must be.

Prepare thyself to follow me."

(at the bottom someone had scrawled)

"To follow thee's not my intent,

unless I know which way thou went."

-- On tombstone in England


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