PHL309 Logic, Language, and Thought
Professor: Craig DeLancey
Office: CC212A
Email: craig.delancey@oswego.edu



Current Assignments
18 February
For the next several days we'll be discussing Kant. I'll post our class notes soon.

2 March
A quick homework. Give an example of a sentence for each of Kant's four kinds: a priori, a posteriori, synthetic, analytic. Each sentence example must be your own (no credit for an example we used in class). Then, can you give an example of an analytic a proiri sentence; an example of a synthetic a posteriori sentence; and a synthetic a priori sentence. (If you disagree with Kant's notions, consider yourself as trying to find examples that he would accept.)

4 March
Start reading Logicomix, if you got it. It is also on reserve in the library, so you can read it there! It's fun and a quick read, and the glossary is really quite good also. (The glossary is a comic also.)

11 March
Midterm. Possible questions include:
  • Reconstruct one of Galileo's arguments that we cannot have an actual infinity or that we cannot have actual infinitesimals. Make your reconstruction an explicit reductio ad absurdum argument, in which you make clear the contradiction, and the premise we reject because of the contradiction.
  • Answer some basic questions about set membership, subsets, powersets, the definition of cardinality.
  • What is Cantor's Claim (about some proper subsets of infinite sets)? How we can use Cantor's Claim (assuming it works) to answer some of Galileo's arguments?
  • Reconstruct Cantor's Diagonal Argument to prove that the cardinality of the reals is greater than the cardinality of the natural numbers.
  • What is Cantor's Theorem?
  • How does Cantor's Theorem, and the claim that a set exists if we can determine its members, result in Cantor's Antinomy.
  • Give an example of a sentence for each of Kant's four kinds: a priori, a posteriori, synthetic, analytic.



Tentative Assignments (subject to revision)
5 May
Final exam, in class, 10:30 a.m. -- 12:30 p.m.