PHL111 Valid Reasoning, Past Assignments




Past Assignments
26 August
Reading: Read chapter 1 of CIL.

We're moving to Marano 306.

Go to the East side of the building -- that's the end near where our old classroom was. On that end of the building only is there a 3rd floor. Go on up!
28 August
Practice: Hand in at the beginning of class your answers to problems 1-5 at the end of chapter 1.
31 August
Reading: Read chapter 2 of the book.

I should have the Blackboard<-->Clickers set up running this week. Usually, I also have short answer questions about the reading posted there also. So expect that before next week.
31 August
Reading: Read chapter 3 of the book.
2 September
Practice: Complete problems 5 and 6 at the end of chapter 2.
11 September
Reading: Read chapter 4 of the book.
18 September
Practice: Do problems 1 and 4 of chapter 4. This is nine proofs, but they are short, and a good block of practice will help you become familiar and comfortable with direct derivations.
25 September
Reading: Read chapter 5 of the book.

Practice: Do problems 2a, 2b, 2d, 2e; and 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d; of chapter 5.
28 September
Practice: I'll be out of town, but will email to you at around 10:20 (and will try to post here also) a problem that should only take about 55 minutes, and which will be due in the philosophy department before 12:30 pm. The office is Marano 212. If no one is there, write FOR DELANCEY on it and slip it under the door (the office should open at 12.) You can work together but must ultimately go off and write it up on your own.

Here is the assignment as a pdf:
A dastardly crime against logic.
2 October
Read chapter 6 of our textbook.
3 October
Steinkraus Lecture. Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness: Mill's Political Philosophy and American Ideals. 2:15 p.m. in the Historic Lecture Hall, room 222 Sheldon.
9 October
Quiz 1. The quiz will have two parts. One part you will do alone, and you will have 20 minutes to complete this part of the quiz. The second part you will do in a group. I made the groups based on trying to mix the majors (that is, I try not to put all the math majors together, etc.). The groups are:

Group 1
Castro, Jarius
Coleman,Vaughan
Collado, Bryan
De Amicis, Nicholas
Jackson,Adam
Joy, Patrick
O'Grady, Morgan
Group 2
Capuano, Marissa
Cusson, Kimberly
Hannahan, Amy
Hickok, James
Mazur, Jesse
Rice, Jessica
Rogers, Gale
Group 3
Bodt, David
DiMaria, Rosemary
Fausner, Allison
Haskins, Austin
Hegarty, Michael
LeRoy, Noelle
Rose, Jordan
Group 4
Brennan, Julia
Carey, Douglas
Mancarella, Peter
Pedone, Matthew
Travis, William
Zeganek, Katarzyna
Group 5
Adu-Agyei, Isaac
Eckler, David
Forman, Stephanie
Krawiecki, Vincent
Persaud, Nadira
Scott-Mohamm, Steven
The quiz will cover everything up to but not including conditional derivation.
12 October
Read chapter 7 of CIL.

Practice: due at the beginning of class. Do the following problems: from chapter 6: 1a, 1f, 2c, 2e, 4; from chapter 7: 2, 3a, 3c, 5.

And homework: watch these five videos by Stephen Chew.
14 October
Read chapter 8 of CIL.

Print chapter 10 of our text. This is just three pages. This is everything you have to memorize to have the basics of the propositional logic. Put it in your notes and use it always as your reference.
16 October
Practice: from chapter 8 of CIL, please do problems 1b, 1c, 1d, and 2d. Each of these will require (at some point in the proof) indirect derivation.

And remember:

1. Free Advice!: watch these five videos by Stephen Chew.

2. Print chapter 10 of our text. This is just three pages. This is everything you have to memorize to have the basics of the propositional logic. Put it in your notes and use it always as your reference.
21 October
Midterm grades are posted. Please note that they are approximate, with a fair amount of error, since the quiz was a bit too easy, and also because this early in the semester missing a few homeworks will have an exaggerated effect.

Practice! Some more problems that will require indirect derivation, because that last homework was tough and we need more practice. Please prove the following.
  1. Chapter 8 problem 1a.
  2. Prove the following: ((¬P v ¬Q) → ¬(P ∧ Q))
  3. Prove the following: (¬(P v Q) → (¬P ∧ ¬Q))
  4. Optional; this one requires cleverness! Chapter 8 problem 1e.
Some hints. For #3, note the following. At some point, you'll be trying to prove (¬P ∧ ¬Q). But note, we know how to do that directly: prove ¬P and prove ¬Q and then do adjunction. So follow that strategy. For #4: this is the hardest proof I'll ever show you in the propositional logic, so don't let it bum you out if you find it really hard. Here's a hint. Use ID. Then, note that it would be great if you could do MTP with the second premise. So, assume that half the disjunction is false, as the AID for another indirect proof. Derive a contradiction. But that means that half is true, in this context. Do MT. You're now almost done....
28 October
Practice: Do problem 1 (parts a, b, c) of chapter 9.
2 November
Practice: Two parts. Part I: Translate the following sentences into our first order logic. Provide a translation key that identifies the names and predicates. David asked that they be Halloween themed, so:
  • Bob is a zombie.
  • Bob is neither a lycanthrope nor female.
  • Bob is a male zombie.
  • Sandi is not a male zombie.
  • Bob is a zombie if and only if he is not a lycanthrope.
  • Pat is not both a zombie and a lycanthrope.
  • Pat is not a zombie, though he is male.
  • Pat and Bob are male.
  • Bob is older than Pat and Sandi.
  • Pat is not older than both Sandi and Bob.
Part II: please complete problem 2 of chapter 11.

Read: chapter 11 of the book.
4 November
Quiz 2. All of the propositional logic! This will be two problems, both of which you will do in teams. But they'll be harder than the last test!

I received some requests to mix up the teams. So here are the quiz 2 teams:

Group 1
Adu-Agyei, Isaac
Coleman,Vaughan
Collado, Bryan
Jackson,Adam
Joy, Patrick
Krawiecki, Vincent
Group 2
Castro, Jarius
Cusson, Kimberly
De Amicis, Nicholas
Hannahan, Amy
Mazur, Jesse
Rice, Jessica
Rose, Jordan
Group 3
Capuano, Marissa
DiMaria, Rosemary
Fausner, Allison
Hickok, James
LeRoy, Noelle
O'Grady, Morgan
Scott-Mohamm, Steven
Group 4
Bodt, David
Carey, Douglas
Haskins, Austin
Mancarella, Peter
Travis, William
Zeganek, Katarzyna
Group 5
Brennan, Julia
Eckler, David
Forman, Stephanie
Hegarty, Michael
Pedone, Matthew
Persaud, Nadira
Rogers, Gale
6 November
Read: chapter 12 of CIL.

In class, we'll review the last homework, review the quiz, and return to the question of translating phrases using the 8 forms.
9 November
Practice: complete problem 2 of chapter 12.

Read: chapter 13.
13 November
Practice: From chapter 13, complete problem 1a, 1b, 1e; problem 2a, 2b, 2c; and problem 3b and 3d.

Read: chapter 14.
20 November
Practice: From chapter 14, complete problem 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1h. Extra credit: can you find an informal model (an interpretation of F and G and a) that makes the following argument obviously invalid? Premises: ∀x(Fx → Gx), Fa; conclusion: Ga.
23 November
Let's have fun and look at some logic applications, to interesting philosophical problems.
30 November
Read: chapter 15.
2 December
Practice: do problems 2 and 3 from chapter 14; and problems 2 and 3 from chapter 15. Extra-credit: problem 4e from chapter 15.

So that we can discuss this new material in class, the homework is due at 4:00 pm in my office. Hopefully if you have any questions, we can discuss them in class, and then you'll have a bit of time to finish up.
7 December
Final exam 10:30 -- 12:30. You will complete the final exam entirely on your own. The exam will be in our regular classroom.