Culturally Relevant Teaching Assignments         

 

    Beyerbach  All assignments except the reflective journal must be word-processed, grammatically and structurally well written, turned in on time, and professionally presented.

 

Class attendance, participation, and reflective journal. (15%) You are expected to be present, participate actively, and will have responsibility for directing some class discussions and presentations.  When you sign up to co-facilitate discussions of the readings, be sure to jot down the emails and phone numbers of co-facilitators. This is a discussion class, dealing with sensitive issues, and all discussions are considered confidential. Students are responsible for contributing their analyses, thoughts, feelings and opinions on issues throughout the semester. Co-facilitators of a discussion are responsible for reading the selection, identifying questions to engage peers in connecting readings to the objectives of the course and their practicum experiences, seeing that there is balanced active participation in the discussion, and engaging in a start-up dialogue about the selection. You will keep a weekly journal reflecting on the required readings in which you summarize main points in one column, and reflect on these in the second column. You will bring this journal to each class to prepare for discussing the readings. In one column of the journal you will note significant topics in the readings, recording major points of interest that the author raises. In a second column you will reflect on these topics—raising questions, making connections to your classroom experiences, identifying issues of importance, and offering critique. You will also connect to other articles you have read. Grading will be done on a 15 point scale.

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15

Multiple absences and/or lateness

Journal is missing  detail in main ideas column and//or analysis and reflections

Rarely or never participates in discussions, or dominates discussion with little evidence of listening

Facilitation role is limited to reading from notes on readings, or low level questions

Some lateness or absence

Journal may include some incomplete or sparse reflection- lacking in analysis, or detail

Occasionally participates in discussion, Occasionally ties in another reading  or connection to practicum experiences

Some preparation for facilitation but lacking in coordination with other group members

 

In attendance, on time, and engaged

Reflections and journal are insightful, up to date, and contain multiple references to other readings beyond course requirement, and multiple connections to practicum experiences.

Actively contributes to discussions demonstrating a variety of communication skills-- active listening, synthesizing, analyzing, probing

Clearly prepared for and effective in facilitation role as evidenced by coordinated plan for discussion of article and connecting to broader course content, insightful questions that encourage dialogue of real issues

Cultural Autobiography. (15%) You will bring an artifact to class that reflects your cultural practices, values, history, or beliefs. You will explain to the class how this artifact can be used to tell who you are.

Later in the semester, you will turn in a 3-5-page essay where you identify your cultural heritage followed by a discussion of your culture. In the paper explore questions such as: What cultural groups do you identify with? Discuss your family culture in terms of values, beliefs, and goals about life success/failure that you have learned.

Discuss your birth and family of origin. Who are your family members? Talk about the cultural history of your parents, grandparents, and if significant, your great-grandparents. Where are they from? What is the primary language, race, religion, culture of your origin?

Describe your upbringing. What do you remember about the neighborhood(s) in which you lived? What ethnic groups resided therein? Was there a predominant group? What do your recall about your neighborhood: focus in particular regarding attitudes about those who were “different” from you?  What was the talk at the dinner table? Were there any teachings that may influence how you feel about any group outside your own?

Describe in rich detail a racial memory. That is recount a clear picture of an incident you had with another individual of a different race, ethnic, linguistic, class, and/or religious group that stands out in your mind. This can be either a negative or positive memory. What did you learn about yourself/this group through revisiting that memory?

Discuss your family culture in terms of values, beliefs, and goals about life success/failure that you have learned. What are some verbal and non-verbal communication skills you have learned from your family? How has your cultural background affected your present beliefs about yourself and others? Talk about how your cultural background has shaped your views about race, class, gender, ability, and sexuality? What messages did you receive about these topics growing up, and what are your current beliefs? How has your culture helped or hindered you in your schooling/teaching?

Describe you now. Discuss your attitudes, feelings, and beliefs about different cultural groups. Discuss how these influence who you are as a teacher and where you need to direct your own learning and self growth. Indicate how the material in this class has assisted you in seeing how the reflections above have shaped who you are, what you believe, and what you must now do to grow beyond where you ‘personally reside’.

As you prepare for this assignment, the following activities might be helpful—

Reflect each week on how the readings broaden your understanding of culture, your own cultural identity, and how culture plays out in the classroom.

Attend to the questions at the end of each chapter in Pang that deal with exploring your own cultural beliefs, assumptions, and attitudes.

Keep notes about your experiences with people of different cultural backgrounds including moments of surprise, discomfort, questioning, and connection? Reflect on what these moments tell you about your cultural identity, and any implications for teaching.

Seek out many ‘multicultural encounters’ and reflect on what you learn from them about both yourself and other cultural groups. Process these thoughts with someone you trust.

Talk with family members and friends about your cultural heritage.

Grading will be on a 15 point scale.

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15

Autobiography tells story but doesn’t link to social structures of race, class, gender, ability,  and sexuality

Questions are answered in a mechanical way without reflective connections to course content

Limited connections between cultural background and implications for teaching present

Autobiography describes cultural identity in a detailed narrative that  depicts your background and makes some connections to social structures and implications for teaching

Most questions are answered in a cohesive narrative that depicts some growth and implications for becoming a culturally relevant educator

Autobiography represents your cultural identity clearly connecting it to historical context and positionality in terms of social structures of race, class, gender, ability, sexuality…

You indicate awareness of how your cultural heritage influences who you are as a person and how it will influence your teaching. You describe a clear plan for becoming a more culturally relevant educator

You refer to multiple experiences you have sought out to expand your intercultural competence and trace the impact of these on your identity and practice of teaching

 


Context Study. (15%)

Learning-Teaching Context (approximately 3+ pages)

 

In this section of your Teacher Work Sample, you must describe the context in which you teach including the culturally-relevant characteristics of the school, classroom, and students. The Learning‑Teaching Context section of your Teacher Work Sample must incorporate your knowledge of individual differences; learner characteristics (e.g., race, class, gender, ability, linguistic community, etc); and the social, cultural, and physical environmental factors that impact learning and teaching. You should describe only those factors in the learning‑teaching context that directly impact your teaching and student learning. For each factor you describe, you must analyze how that factor impacts the teaching of your instructional sequence and your students’ learning.

 

School characteristics. Provide a brief description of the school including the type of school and grade/subject configuration. (See New York State data at http://www.just4kids.org/ or http://emsc33.nysed.gov/irts/reportcard/; and your school district web site, e.g., http://www.oswegoboces.org/about/about_districts.asp and http://www.ocmboces.org/OCM/schools/admin2.html.)  Then describe major characteristics of the school that impact your instructional planning, delivery, and assessment. You should include any district or state mandates, such as required texts, curricula, and content standards, services available in the school for students with special needs, and the culturally-relevant characteristics of the local neighborhood in which the school is located. Remember, for each factor you describe, you must analyze how that factor impacts the teaching of your instructional sequence and your students’ learning.

 

Classroom characteristics. Describe the classroom in which you are teaching the instructional sequence presented in your Teacher Work Sample. You should describe the classroom rules and routines, physical arrangements, grouping patterns, and scheduling that affect learning and teaching (e.g., push-ins, pull-outs, teaming, etc). Again, for each factor you describe, you must analyze how that factor impacts the teaching of your instructional sequence and your students’ learning.

 

Student characteristics. Describe the students in the classroom including the number of students and their ages and gender, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, native language(s) and levels of English proficiency, range of abilities, and special needs. Remember, for each factor you describe, you must analyze how that factor impacts the teaching of your instructional sequence and your students’ learning.

 

Learning-Teaching Contextual Factors Standard 1: The candidate uses information about the learning/teaching context and student individual differences to plan culturally-relevant instruction and assessments of student learning.

Indicators

                                                                                Quality Rating

Knowledge of Community, School and Classroom Factors

□ 0=Indicator Not Met

Context analysis displays minimal, irrelevant, or biased knowledge of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom.

□ 1=Not Met
But Some Competencies Are Emerging

See Comments

□ 2= Met
But Some Competencies Need Development

See Comments

□ 3=Indicator Met

Context analysis displays a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning.

4=Outstanding

Candidate displays performance expected of an exemplary master teacher (see comments)

Knowledge of  Individual Student Characteristics, Skills & Approaches to Learning

□ 0=Indicator Not Met

Context analysis displays minimal, stereotypical, or irrelevant knowledge of student differences – development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities, skills, prior learning, learning styles/modalities.

□ 1=Not Met
But Some Competencies Are Emerging

See Comments

□ 2=Met But Some Competencies Need Development See Comments

□ 3=Indicator Met

Context analysis displays general & specific understanding of student differences that may affect learning – development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities, skills, prior learning, learning styles/modalities.

4=Outstanding

Candidate displays performance expected of an exemplary master teacher (see comments)

Implications for Instructional Planning and Assessment

□ 0=Indicator Not Met

Context analysis does not provide implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics and/or  provides inappropriate implications.

□ 1=Not Met

But Some Competencies Are Emerging

See Comments

□ 2=Met But Some Competencies Need Development See Comments

□ 3=Indicator Met

Context analysis provides specific implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics.

4=Outstanding

Candidate displays performance expected of an exemplary master teacher (see comments)

Overall Learning-              Not Met.................................... Met

Teaching Context Score:   □ 0           □ 1           □ 2           □ 3

Comments:

Text Box: OPTIONAL
Total Indicator Score for Standard: ___________/9
Text Box: Outstanding
□ 4 (for exceptional overall performance only)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Book of Choice Reaction Paper. (10%). You will choose a book of choice from the above list, read the book, and write a 3-5 page reaction paper in which you link themes of the course to themes in the book. These books all offer teachers reflecting on their practice relating to socio-cultural challenges and sensibilities an educator faces. Reflect on the characters experiences in terms of social structures (race, class, gender, ability, sexuality) and reflect on how culture shaped the characters lives. Discuss implications for your culturally relevant teaching. You will be given class time to discuss your book with your peers.

Book of Choice Reaction Paper & Activity (10)

Criteria

0

1

2

Organized, clear language,  including grammar, punctuation, style, etc.

 

 

 

 

Appropriate summary of your book  emphasizing major themes

 

 

 

Clear and consistent explanation of themes of race, class, gender, ability, sexuality and power in the reading and cultural implications

 

 

 

Logical use of evidence from the book to support themes of the course

 

 

 

 

Inclusion of personal reflections , indications of concepts learned  and how they are relevant to your understanding of Culturally Relevant Teaching

 

 

 

 


Multicultural Encounter. (5%). You will participate in a hands-on multicultural experience that takes you out of your own culture to learn about another culture. You will complete a cross-cultural experience and describe the experience in a 2 page, typed paper. The paper should describe the experience and explain how it expanded your cultural awareness, knowledge about a cultural perspective, or growth towards greater understanding and tolerance for a cultural group different from your own. Examples might include attending ORI events around The Speed of Dark, religious services, fine arts and dramatic performances or exhibitions, a gay community event if you are straight, speeches with cultural themes, and ethnic festivals and performances. The best cross-cultural experiences are those that explore deep culture rather than surface culture and those that involve personal social interaction rather than observation from a distance.

Criteria

0

1

comments

Organized, clear language, including grammar, punctuation, style, references, etc.

 

 

 

Evidence of understanding culture from the perspectives of others; substantive exploration of a culture other than you own

 

 

 

Evidence of cross-cultural experience that explores deep culture rather than surface culture; involving social interaction rather than just observation

 

 

 

Logical use of evidence from the experience to support themes of the course

 

 

 

Inclusion of personal reflections , indications of concepts learned  and how they are relevant to your understanding of Culturally Relevant Teaching

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL …………………………………..0……………………………………………5


 

GESA Observation and Reflection. (5%). As part of ongoing class activities you will learn about the equity program, Generating Expectations for Student Achievement, studying five areas of disparity linking teacher behaviors to differential learning outcomes for students. You will choose one area of disparity to work on in your own emerging teaching practice, and will have your practicum partner observe your teaching recording data on that area. You will reflect on the data and what you have learned about your teaching, and formulate goals to move towards a more equitable practice, in a 2-3 page typed paper.

Popular Culture Study and Social Action Project. (20%) With your practicum partner you will survey and/or interview students in your class to get an understanding of what they are reading, viewing, engaging in via video games, etc. You will use this survey and interview data to analyze how individuals are represented or misrepresented in this media with regards to gender, race, or class, or ability. You will develop a social action plan that suggests more culturally relevant media appropriate for that grade level, and that includes a lesson plan in which you have your students critically analyze reading/viewing/gaming materials they are using with regards to how a particular group (gender, class, race, ability) is represented. The lesson must focus on awareness of bias and include a social justice focus.

Below are some suggested steps for completing your Popular Culture and Social Action Project.

  1. With your partner, complete the Checklist for Evaluating Information Materials (looking at curriculum materials in your practicum Classroom).
  2. With your Partner, complete the Multicultural Education Evaluation Checklist based on what you currently know about the school (put d.k. where you don’t know about the topic).
  3. Alone, Complete the Effective Instructional Strategies checklist based on an assessment of your own teaching.
  4. USE THESE THREE INSTRUMENTS to discuss with your partner your perceptions about the current instructional materials, school context, and your own teaching strengths and needs—TURN in these instruments with your assignment. WRITE A BRIEF SUMMARY OF YOUR CONCLUSIONS FROM THIS ASSESSMENT.
  5. Based on your assessments, your current understanding of your classroom and students, and your interests, choose a focus around which to conduct your study (e.g. race, class, ability, gender, sexuality). Also choose a media or popular culture genre to investigate (e.g. children’s literature, videogames, cartoons, movies, TV shows, music). You can combine more than one but don’t be too broad. DESCRIBE THIS FOCUS IN YOUR WRITE UP.
  6. Survey your students’ interests/reading or viewing or listening preferences in that area by either designing a written survey or talking with them one on one, or in small groups, (this can be done in the lunch room, while walking to a special, in the few moments before or after school, etc.). Get a sense of what is popular in terms of what they are viewing, reading, etc. DESCRIBE YOUR QUESTIONS ASKED, AND/OR ATTACH SUREVYS, AND STUDENT RESPONSES.
  7. Use this information to decide what to analyze (e.g. you may decide to look in depth at several episodes of one cartoon show, or several popular cartoons, or the Harry Potter series, to examine how males vs. females, or Asians vs. whites are represented). DESCRIBE YOUR DECISIONMAKING PROCESS ON HOW YOU CHOSE A FOCUS.
  8. Conduct your analysis by carefully recording data on what you observe as you view, read, listen. Examine your data and describe patterns and trends, stereotypes, biases, distortions, omissions. DESCRIBE YOUR FINDINGS AND SUPPORT THESE WITH EVIDENCE FROM YOUR OBSERVATIONS.
  9. Develop a social action plan that suggests more culturally relevant media appropriate for that grade level (use your texts, resources on my web site and other websites, the curriculum materials center, the school library, etc.). Develop a lesson plan that in which you have your s students critically analyze reading/viewing/gaming materials they are using with regards to how a particular group is represented. WRITE UP THE CULTURALLY RELEVANT RESOURCES AS WELL AS THE LESSON PLAN.
  10. Reflect on and WRITE UP what you learned from this process.

Single Group Study—Group Investigation. (15) You will participate in a group investigation researching a particular ethnic group in our country (e.g. African Americans, Euro-American . . .). Your group will participate in a web quest in class (and it will be available outside of class Web Quest site www.oswego.edu/~beyerbac ).  You will:

 

·                      Research the history and current issues relating to this group including issues of power, privilege, and oppression. You will present this history to the class, including a 2-page descriptive handout with major findings and resources used (Cite all sources using APA style).

·                      Examine curricular materials in your classroom to see how this group is (mis)represented in children’s literature, visual materials, texts. . . and suggest more inclusive, authentic curriculum resources that could be used.

·                      Develop a Learning Center or Web Quest for your Grade Level (s) that can be used with students about the group you have investigated.

·                      You will present this history, resource list, and center or web quest to the class, including a descriptive handout with major findings and resources used.

Handout Guidelines—Report on the following in a 2 page handout for all class

1. History:       Two Foci

            1. Group’s historical experiences

·        group’s past and recent experiences

·        told from the perspectives of the group. Purpose is to document the group’s history and contributions to society. 

2. Traces and explains how the dominant group has oppressed the group being studied. Give examples:  (Lesson Plans – all grade levels)

·        indigenous people in Mexico

·        Irish immigrants in New York

·        Chinese immigrants in California, etc.

2. Culture:      A whole way of life of the group, including:

·        Group’s literature

·        Language

·        Music

·        Art – Philosophy and technology

·        Cultural contributions

·        Group’s creativity – meaning the group’s existence

·        Selfhood

·        Cross-cultural sharing

·        The community can be an excellent resource

o       Exploring religious institutions

o       Neighborhood stores,  Community Centers

o       Interviews, etc.

3. Current Status of the Group

·        Current needs & experiences

·        Issues the group faces

·        Political organizations / Advocacy

·        Education

4. Issues of Particular Concern

Examples:

Puerto Ricans, Central Americans, Mexicans – issues, language

Jewish Americans – Holocaust , negative stereotypes

Arab Americans – Occupation of Palestine, American involvement in terror

Asian Americans – Model Minority Myth

5. Action Research: Examine how your group has been represented in the curriculum.

·        Textbook Analysis

·        Picture Analysis

·        Language Analysis

·        Storyline Analysis

·        Miscellaneous Analyses

·        Compiling the Findings

 

Learning Center and Web Quest Guidelines—You will prepare a learning center or webquest to share in your group presentation.

 

Definition of a Learning Center   A learning center is an instructional activity developed to support learning objectives, in which students work independently or collaboratively to engage in learning activities at their own pace. A variety of learning styles and resources should be incorporated.

 

Definition of a Web Quest  A Web Quest is an inquiry oriented, instructional  activity developed to support learning objectives in which students work independently or collaboratively to engage in learning activities at their own pace, and in which some or all of the information that students interact with comes from resources on the internet.

 

Hybrids  Of course you can integrate aspects of a learning center and web quest by designing activities both on line, and using other media and materials, by having an on line center in your learning center rotation, etc.

 

Both Learning Centers and Web Quests:

 

A well designed Center or Web Quest

 

Design Steps

 

Write up your learning center/webquest with Objectives, learning activities, resources, guidelines, and assessment plan and turn in on the night of your group presentation. You will create the actual center and share in the class presentation, along with the two page handout on your group.

 

Rubric for Single Group Study Investigation (15 points)

 

 

Criteria

1

2

3

Organized, clear Presentation, including visuals, handout, outline, and a variety of resources cited

 

 

 

Evidence of research on the culture, history, current issues of power and oppression of the ethnic group

 

 

 

Evidence of increased knowledge base  and awareness of bias and attention to social justice

 

 

 

Includes suggestions for curricular change or resources in form of clearly stated learning objectives for the learning center or webquest; activities or methods for more inclusive, authentic learning; guidelines for use and assessment plan

 

 

 

Inclusion of personal reflections, indications of concepts learned  and how they are relevant to your understanding of Culturally Relevant Teaching shared in presentation

 

 

 

  Total = 15  / your score =

 

 

 

Evaluation and Grades: assigning points for each assignment to a possible total of 100 will determine a course grade. A=95-100, A- = 90-94, B+=87-89, B=83-86, B-=80-82, C+=77-79, C=73-76, C-=70-72, D=65-69, E= below 65