The Weather: Alumna is Doing Something About It

Judy Levan ’81

Everyone talks about the weather, but when the comments and complaints become watches and warnings, Judith Levan ’81 hopes everyone’s listening. “We’re the ones that set off the tones on the radio. We’re the ones who send out those crawlers when you’re watching your favorite TV show,” says Levan, the warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather

Students at SUNY Oswego Pinpoint Storms for Schools

Photo by John

When Oswego County BOCES trans­portation supervisor Kathy Jamerson thinks there might be a bad winter storm ahead, she turns to students at SUNY Oswego for help.

“They’re local, so their forecasts are a little more accurate, a little more specific,“ Jamerson said. “They are really good at pinpointing the very time a storm will go through. Like we’ll be thinking of dismissing at noon, but they’ll say, ‘No. It will be worse at noon than at your regular dismissal time.’”

No. 29 – Epic Snowfalls

Digging out, 1958

With its location on Lake Ontario, Oswego is known for its legendary lake effect snow. And while every year has the potential for mountains of the white stuff, certain years saw blizzards of historic proportions.

Alumni who were on campus in the years 1958, 1966, 1978 and 1993 will never forget how Oswego made headlines around the country and across the globe for the feet of snow that piled up in a matter of hours.

Judy Driscoll Skillen ’61 recalled the snowstorm that greeted students returning from the 1958 Thanksgiving Break. “I was living in Johnson at the time,” she said. “We never went to school that whole week. They airlifted in food.” Other grads tell stories of climbing out second story windows and walking on the tops of cars.

No. 1 – Applause-worthy Sunsets

Photo by Robert J. Clark '78

Have you ever applauded a sunset? Many Oswegonians have.

The sight of the sun dropping just below the shimmering horizon has captivated most who cast their eyes upon it. Sunsets are perhaps Oswego’s most universally loved features.

“I will never forget it until the day I die,” Deb Roe ’73 told the late historian and Professor Emerita Dorothy Rogers. “We were all on the west campus on the bluff watching this particularly beautiful sunset.