Chemistry: a winning formula for Pagano

Chemistry: a winning formula for Pagano

Todd Pagano ’96 isn’t trying to win awards.
The Oswego chemistry graduate is focused on doing high-level research in florescence spectroscopy that can help predict the formation of dangerous carcinogens in drinking water and map cancer-causing chemicals in cigarette smoke as a member of the Rochester Institute of Technology faculty.

Scanning electron microscope offers nanoscale views

Scanning electron microscope offers nanoscale views

When Fehmi Damkaci peers at the computer monitor next to the gleaming electron gun of the college’s new scanning electron microscope, he sees the future — a vital piece of equipment for the sciences and their new home.
As the nanoscale — a nanometer is one-billionth of a meter — images appear in high definition, Damkaci reminisces about having to travel to Syracuse to obtain sample data about atomic structures that were once only theorized … and not being able to touch the machine.

Sciences project heats up

Sciences project heats up

Contractors have drilled the 240th and final geothermal well to help heat and cool the new Science and Engineering Innovation Corridor.

“With that, this completes over 22.7 miles of drilling and [nearly] 46 miles of piping that went into the wells,” said Allen Bradberry, pictured far right, the college’s liaison with construction companies working on the sciences project.

Photo: Science and Engineering Innovation Corridor construction

Science, Engineering and Innovation Corridor construction

Work is ongoing at Oswego’s new Science and Engineering Innovation Corridor. Renovation of the now-vacant Piez Hall and construction of an addition that will more than triple its present 80,000 square feet are scheduled for completion in 2013. In the meantime, science classes, offices and labs have been relocated to Snygg Hall. The multiphase project, whose total costs have been estimated at $118 million, is being bonded through the SUNY Construction Fund. Oswego is constructing the new science facilities to the U.S. Green Building Council’s gold standard for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

Grant funds student astrophysics research in Taiwan

Grant funds student astrophysics research in Taiwan

The National Science Foundation has awarded SUNY Oswego faculty member Shashi Kanbur a $138,545 grant to provide students interested in astrophysics opportunities to do research at a Global Laboratory partner in Taiwan.

The grant, titled “Astrophysics International Research Experience for Students in Taiwan: Connections Between East and West,” started this summer. It enables Kanbur and Ching Hung “Jean” Hsiao, adjunct instructor of Chinese, to mentor six students each of the next three years on research trips to the Graduate Institute of Astronomy at National Central University in Jhongli, Taiwan.