Getting at the Heart of Lake Effect Snow Storms

Associate Professor of Meteorology Scott Steiger ’99 and a team of collaborators, supported by National Science Foundation grants, fly into the heart of lake effect snowstorms to study their structure and improve forecasting.

Last spring, SUNY Oswego received a $320,000 National Science Foundation grant to fly and drive into the heart of lake effect snowstorms to study their structure and improve forecasting. Field work began in December. “We are getting awesome data from this storm!” said Associate Professor of Meteorology Scott Steiger ’99 after a mid-December snow storm

$872,523 grant to help younger students stay with STEM

Damkaci and Peng

The National Science Foundation recently awarded SUNY Oswego a five-year, $872,523 grant to boost the retention of freshmen and sophomores in STEM majors.

The grant will enable the college to increase support services — especially in math and chemistry — and research opportunities for all science, technology, engineering and math majors, with a particular eye to helping younger students avoid academic disqualification, switches to non-STEM majors and other departures from science and math disciplines.

Lake-effect fame spreads abroad

Scott Steiger

Winter break’s heavy snows and a radar-lugging vehicle known as a Doppler-on-Wheels have enabled Professor Scott Steiger ’99 and several meteorology students to witness never-before-seen phenomena — like a line of seven tornado-like waterspouts in one lake-effect storm — and to collect unique data.