Gratitude Flowing Two Ways Inspires Gift From ’54 Alumnus

Susan and Robert ’54 Allen during Reunion 2014

When recipients of the annual Class of 1954 Scholarship sent letters of appreciation to Robert Allen ’54, he recognized the extent of their gratitude. He had worked with the Reunion 2004 committee to establish an anniversary class scholarship because he knows from personal experience what it means for students to work their way through college.

Former Teacher Remembered Through Scholarship

Edwin Peterson ’54 and his late wife Katheen Manley Peterson ’54.

The family of Kathleen Manley Peterson ’54 has ensured that her dedicated career in teaching and her impressive record of volunteer work will be remembered. A scholarship in her name will be awarded to an Oswego junior or senior majoring in education who maintains honor grades, has demonstrated volunteer activity and can, in an essay,

No. 85 – Campus School

Campus School

Whether they called it a practice school, training school or campus school, generations of Oswego education majors observed master teachers and practiced their own teaching skills in Sheldon Hall, and later Swetman Hall. The Campus School closed in the budget cuts of the 1980s, but its legacy lives on in the thousands of teachers who learned their craft in its walls and the millions of their students who benefited from teachers trained in “The Oswego Method.”

No. 126 – Beanies!

Beanies!

It’s a rite of passage that freshmen of a certain era will never forget — the wearing of beanies. Graduates from the ’40s to the early ’70s donned the green and gold chapeaux or earned “demerits” from upperclassmen. The first-years also had to answer questions from their elders or sing the alma mater on demand, as Ernie Leal ’47 did during orientation.

Faculty Hall of Fame: Charles Phallen

Professor Emeritus Charles Phallen

Anzio Beach, Monte Cassino, Normandy: To most, these are names from a map or history book. To Charles Phallen, emeritus professor of technology education, they are places he served valiantly in World War II and visits now, at age 94, to receive honors from a grateful populace or pay respects at the graves of fallen comrades.

Last year, France honored him with the Chevalier Legion of Honor. The Legion of Honor is the highest award France can bestow, and it was presented to Phallen for his “personal, precious contribution to the United States’ decisive role in the liberation of our country.”