Farm Chic: Global Food Entrepreneur Tessa Edick ’92 Brings Local Farming To The Table

Farm Chic: Global Food Entrepreneur Tessa Edick ’92 Brings Local Farming To The Table

Tessa Edick ’92 hopes to revolutionize the way New Yorkers eat to save local farming, improve nutrition and build stronger communities.   With more than a third of all farmers in America over the age of 65 and the percentage of farmers younger than 35 steadily declining to now less than 5.6 percent, one Oswego graduate is asking: Who is

Re-Instituted Homecoming Brings Together Alumni and Students

Re-Instituted Homecoming Brings Together Alumni and Students

Hundreds of alumni, students, faculty, staff, family and friends traveled from near and far to celebrate our re-established campus tradition on Nov. 14 and show their Laker pride. “We were very happy with the number of Oswego family members who turned out for Homecoming 2015,” said Laura Pavlus Kelly ’09, director of alumni and parent

A Sense of Place: The Residential Campus Experience

A Sense of Place: The Residential Campus Experience

Residential life is part of the culture of SUNY Oswego, an essential component of a student’s experience. It is the intersection of people and place, an active and vibrant core of college life that builds a sense of community and nurtures a spirit of lifelong learning. Research supports the idea that students who live in

Oz to LA: The Road From Campus to Cali

Oz to LA: The Road From Campus to Cali

According to a 2013 study by the University of Southern California, Los Angeles has “shifted from a place of transplants to a home where the majority are native Californians.” Yet, there is a common aphorism in LA that “you’ll never meet a native Angeleno.” This is because many residents of LA, or Angelenos, have a story

Wicked Weather: Meteorology Alumni Recall Oswego Weather

Wicked Weather: Meteorology Alumni Recall Oswego Weather

Part of SUNY Oswego alumni’s bragging rights resides in having conquered the (sometimes) inclement weather, particularly the snowy, cold winters, on campus. But the dramatic weather and lakefront campus also make the college the perfect place for students to learn in a world-class meteor­ology program. Plus, nothing brings a campus together like being snowed in

Wicked Weather: The Blizzard of ’66

Wicked Weather: The Blizzard of ’66

In January 1966, 10-year-old Jim Farfaglia ’77 was cele­brating his grandmother’s surprise 70th birthday party in Fulton, N.Y., when what would become known as the Blizzard of ’66 started blasting the region with snow and winds in excess of 60 miles per hour. Luckily, his family in their trusty ’58 Ford Fairlane arrived safely at their

Meteorology Program Advances In Step With Technology

Meteorology Program Advances In Step With Technology

In the beginning, there was a single teletype machine spitting out National Weather Service reports in SUNY Oswego’s Piez Hall. There were students and professors gathered around pieces of paper, working out complicated mathematical equations using raw meteorological data to develop weather forecasts—with a pencil. “There just wasn’t much available in the way of tools,”

Roker On Campus to Talk About The Storm of the Century

Roker On Campus to Talk About The Storm of the Century

Less than a year after he did live on-campus broadcasts of “Wake Up With Al” and NBC’s “Today” show, Al Roker ’76 returned to campus Sept. 25, making time for visits with students before an evening book reading and discussion of his latest writing project, The Storm of the Century. He made good use of

Alumni: An Essential Strand of The Tapestry of Success

Alumni: An Essential Strand of The Tapestry of Success

   When a team of evaluators for the National Council for Accreditation for Teacher Education Board of Examiners visited campus in April 2014 to attend a school partnership showcase, they received programs with the Oswego School of Education logo printed on the front. The image features the word “weaving” and represents the intertwined elements essential

Bridging the Chasm: Dyslexia Scholar Applies Research to Benefit Diverse Learners

Bridging the Chasm: Dyslexia Scholar Applies Research to Benefit Diverse Learners

As a newly minted Ph.D. graduate, Gordon F. Sherman ’75 was studying the donated brain of a dyslexic individual, and he and his colleagues at a Harvard University lab noted unusual clusters of neurons in the left hemisphere—the part of the brain responsible for language. But while the senior researchers were concentrating on those clusters,