Researcher to design X-ray detector

Marianne Hromalik, a new computer science faculty member, completed her post-doctoral work at Cornell University last spring, but the “homework” has kept right on coming.

Cornell’s Laboratory for Atomic and Solid State Physics has subcontracted Hromalik, under a Department of Energy Grant, to work on programming a versatile detector for X-rays used to examine the structure of viruses and proteins, to monitor materials fatigue in aircraft parts and to do much more.

Marianne Hromalik, assistant professor of computer science, displays a computer circuit board that includes a detector (bottom right gray rectangle) of the type used to capture and store X-ray data used in scientific research.

Marianne Hromalik, assistant professor of computer science, displays a computer circuit board that includes a detector (bottom right gray rectangle) of the type used to capture and store X-ray data used in scientific research.

Hromalik is a native of the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago with a doctorate from the University of Sussex in England.

Cornell researchers, Oswego computer science chair Douglas Lea ’86 and Hromalik are working with computer science major Benjamin Paretzky ’11 on perfecting another detector developed in the larger grant.

Meanwhile, Hromalik is teaching courses in computer science that eventually will form part of the requirements of the new electrical and computer engineering program, now in development.

Rachid Manseur, associate professor of computer science, leads the effort to create the new engineering program, with Adrian Ieta, assistant professor of physics, and Hromalik.

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