Glossary of Terms

Select the first letter of the word from the list above to jump to appropriate section of the glossary. If the term you are looking for starts with a digit or symbol, choose the '#' link

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # 


A -

ACADEMIC RANK
The academic rank of teaching faculty is designated in accordance with SUNY appointment procedures and is determined by the permanent titles they hold, including Full Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, Instructor, Lecturer, and Teaching Assistant. Additional categories identify personnel paid out of temporary service funds, those who contribute their services, and personnel who have no academic rank (e.g., administrators). [CASA]

ACCUMULATED CREDIT HOURS
The number of credit hours that a student has successfully completed; this includes credits earned at his/her present campus and credits earned at other institutions which have been accepted by your institution for the satisfaction of any requirements of a formal award. Credits granted for experiential learning and credits by examination are also included if they meet the above conditions. For GRADUATE students, this includes only those accumulated credits which can be used to satisfy the requirements of a graduate award. [SDF, element 17, ADF elements 16, 17.]

ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENT
A student in a DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAM or GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM (Certificate of Advanced Study, Educational Specialist, University Certificate, ) who (1) holds a master's degree in any field, OR WHO
(2) has accumulated 24 or more semester credit hours beyond their bachelor's degree.
[The identification of advanced graduate students is derived from SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID and SDF element 12 DEGREES EARNED and SDF element 17 ACCUMULATED CREDIT HOURS.] [CASA]

APIS
(Academic Program Information System) -- The inventory of all academic programs offered by the State University of New York. This file contains the official name of each academic program, its approval status, campus, award level, award, and federal (HEGIS, CIP) and SUNY taxonomic codes. Where necessary, dates of program deactivation or discontinuance are included. The APIS file is the point of departure for the collection of any data which must be arrayed by program. Historical, as well as current data, are recorded on the APIS file. Because the APIS file contains the University's official list of approved programs, it provides the system wide review framework for examining requests for program addition or elimination. It is used to develop annual enrollment and degrees granted statistics for all State University institutions by integrating data from the Student Data File and the Automated Degree File.

AUDITORS (SPECIAL)
Under SUNY policy, all those who are 60 years of age and older and enrolled only as auditors are eligible to receive free instruction on a space available basis (see Memorandum to Presidents Vol. 74 No. 42, found in the SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS addendum to this glossary.

AUTOMATED DEGREE FILE (ADF)
State University's automated information system for recording degrees granted. This is a unit record reporting system containing demographic and programmatic data on individual student completions.

AVERAGE CREDIT ENROLLMENT PER FTE FACULTY
This measure of instructional workload is equal to the ratio of total credit enrollment by Instructional FTE Faculty: AVERAGE CREDIT ENROLLMENT PER FTE FACULTY = SCRH/FTE FACULTY AVERAGE WEEKLY CONTACT HOURS PER FTE FACULTY=WFCOH/FTE FACULTY

AWARD
The specific degree, diploma or certificat granted by our institution upon completion of the requirements of a PROGRAM. The award should be coded exactly as it is given for each program in Appendix C to the Student Data File manual. [ SDF element 15.4, ADF element 21.4, 22.4.]

AWARD LEVEL
A one position numeric code indicating the level of the academic program (associate, bachelors, masters, etc.) in which the student is matriculated. Not In a Program students are assigned their own code. [SDF element 15.1, ADF element 21.2, 22.2.]

Back to Top

 




- B -   BEGINNING GRADUATE STUDENT
A student who meets any one (or more) of the following conditions: a. A STUDENT ENROLLED IN A DOCTORAL DEGREE program or GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM who has accumulated fewer than 24 semester credit hours beyond their bachelor's degree and does not hold a master degree in any field. b. A STUDENT ENROLLED IN A FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM c. A GRADUATE STUDENT IN A MASTER'S PROGRAM. d. A GRADUATE STUDENT not admitted to a formal PROGRAM. [The identification of beginning graduate students is derived from SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID and SDF element 12 DEGREES EARNED and SDF element 17 ACCUMULATED CREDIT HOURS.] [CASA]

 Back to Top

 

 



- C -

CAMPUS CODE
Numerical identifiers are used within each system for each campus within the State University system. For the CASA system, the four digit number used is identical to the accounting number used within the SUNY accounting system. For the Student Data File and the Automated Degree File, the six digit FICE code is used as the identifier. Additionally, APIS has a system of three- digit campus codes which facilitate simplified analyses by institution type. [SDF elements 1, 15.2; CASA, element 1; ADF element 13.] CASA (Course And Section Analysis)
The State University's inventory of all courses and sections of instruction for a given term which is used to develop workload and cost data. Information is reported for each section of every course offered by the participating institutions. The department responsible for each section, along with coding of the course content, credit value, instruction type, when and where it meets, the number and level of students in the section and an identifier of who teaches the section are reported. CASA information is combined with a personnel file, an expenditure file, and a physical space inventory file to estimate unit costs of courses and departments. Other outputs from the system include student to faculty ratios, faculty utilization, class sizes and physical space utilization reports.

CENSUS DATE
(for submitting official data for CASA and SDF) a. State-Operated/Funded Institutions and Community Colleges: For semester calendar instruction, the census date is the end of the third week of classes. For quarter calendar instruction, the census date is the end of the second week of classes. It is intended that the census date defines the time in the academic term when a stable student population and registration have been achieved. For summer or mini-terms, the census date is left to the best judgment of the campus administration and should represent a reasonable point of enrollment stabilization which should be no earlier than the point at which 20% of the class work has been completed. b. Additional Requirements for Community Colleges: Enrollment reporting for the Community Colleges involves a number of concepts, viz., class attendance data, procedures for verifying class attendance, student schedule change process and census date. These are described in detail in the Appendix entry "Community College Enrollment Reporting," which is a selection from section 13 of the Manual for Community College Business Officers. It should be examined to determine the conditions under which a student may be reported on official enrollment surveys.
In general, a student may be reported if there is a properly verified class attendance on, or subsequent to, (but not merely prior to) the census date. The census date for semester institutions is the end of the third week of classes ( 20 calendar days after the first day of classes), for quarter calendar institutions, the census date is the end of the second week of classes ( 13 calendar days after the first day of classes). The usual process of dropping or adding courses must be completed prior to the census date.

CIP (Classification of Instructional Programs) TAXONOMY OF DISCIPLINE DIVISION A taxonomy of 50 academic disciplines which can be used to classify either courses or academic majors. The taxonomy is further refined by a second and third tiers of subcategories within each major division. Designed by the federal Department of Education, the Classification of Instructional Programs is meant to expand upon and replace the older HEGIS TAXONOMY OF DISCIPLINE DIVISIONS. For a complete listing of the CIP taxonomy, see theSUPPORTING DOCUMENTS addendum to this glossary. (See also DISCIPLINE, HEGIS TAXONOMY OF DISCIPLINE DIVISIONS.)

CLASS ATTENDANCE DATA (Community Colleges only) During the first three weeks of each term (for semester calendar campuses) faculty shall maintain daily student attendance records for each class they teach, preferably on a class roster prepared from the official registration records of the institution as provided to the faculty member during the first week of class. In addition to daily attendance, the list shall be amended by the faculty member to indicate appropriate student schedule adjustments as determined by the STUDENT SCHEDULE CHANGE PROCESS defined below.

CLASS SIZE
Class size is a summary of the sizes of only those sections conducted in lecture, seminar, recitation, and laboratory mode and represents the ratio of weekly student contact hours to weekly faculty contact hours. Tutorial and other types of non-classroom instruction are excluded. [CASA]

COMPLIANCE CATEGORY:
A code used to define the racial ethnic category to which an individual belongs. While the method of ascertaining the racial/ethnic identity of an individual may vary among institutions, the following are the "definitions" of categories as supplied to us by the U. S. Department of Education: WHITE, NON-HISPANIC -- A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East (except those of Hispanic origin).
BLACK, NON-HISPANIC -- A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa (except those of Hispanic origin).
HISPANIC -- A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.
ASIAN OR PACIFIC ISLANDER -- A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This area includes, for example, China, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, and Samoa. AMERICAN INDIAN OR ALASKAN NATIVE --A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North America, and who maintain cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.
NON-RESIDENT ALIEN -- A person who is not a citizen or a national of the United States and who is in this country on a temporary basis and does not have the right to remain indefinitely. Resident aliens, who are not citizens or nationals of the United States and who have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence ... are to be reported in the appropriate racial/ethnic categories along with United States citizens. [SDF element 8, ADF element 19].
UNKNOWN -- A student whose racial/ethnic identity is unknown to the institution. This category is seldom to be used.

CONTINUING STUDENT
a. Undergraduate -- an UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT in the current term who was enrolled at your institution during the previous term. In the case of the fall term, "previous term" shall mean either the previous summer or spring term; e.g., those UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS in the Fall 1992 who were enrolled at your institution during the Summer 1992 or Spring 1992 term are continuing students, subject to the exception stated in FIRST-TIME STUDENTS. b. Graduate -- a GRADUATE STUDENT in the current term who was enrolled at your institution during the previous term. In the case of the fall term, "previous term" shall mean either the previous summer or spring term; e.g., those GRADUATE STUDENTS in the Fall 1992 who were enrolled as GRADUATE STUDENTS at your institution during the Summer 1992 or Spring 1992 term are continuing students. [See SDF element 10 HIGHER EDUCATION HISTORY]

CONTRACT COURSES (State-Operated campuses only)
Contract Courses for credit enrollment under SUTRA are unlimited as to enrollment, but must meet the following conditions: 1. The instructional activity must be contracted for and paid by a third part (a corporation, state agency, union, etc.). 2. The enrollment in the designated course(s) or section(s) must be restricted to individuals specified in the contract through an affiliation with the third party. 3. All costs of the program must be charged to the^ contracting third party and per student rates must be set at the greater of regular tuition or at a level sufficient to cover the total costs incurred by the program, including direct instructional costs, support costs, overhead charges and fringe benefits. These credit bearing activities (SUTRA) do not generate regularly budgeted State supported F.T.E. workload.

COURSE DATA
[SDF element 28]

COURSE DATA COUNTER [SDF element 27]

COURSE ENROLLMENT
Course Enrollment is the number of students in the sections of a course. Anyone registered for credit, regardless of full-time or part-time status, is included. Auditors and post-doctoral enrollees, as well as UUP employees with tuition wavers, are excluded. [CASA, element 32]

COURSE LEVEL
The instructional level of a course identifies the level of student at which the course is primarily directed. Three levels are defined: lower division undergraduate, upper division undergraduate, and graduate. In CASA, an advanced graduate section is defined as a graduate level section in which at least half the enrollment is made up of ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS. [CASA, element 6, SDF element 28.1]

COURSES SUPPORTED BY ACCOUNT CC2423
According to the Uniform System of Accounts for Community Colleges and the Manual for Community College Business Officers, these courses are offered on a self-sustaining basis at the request of and for the benefit of local business or non- profit organizations. These courses are also called contract courses and their costs are recorded under Account CC2423, Sponsored Research and Other Sponsored Programs- Other Programs. [See SDF element 28.8 COURSE DATA--CREDIT TYPE.]

CREDIT COURSES
Those courses which can be used to meet the requirements of a degree, diploma or certificate granted by your institution. [See SDF elements 28.8 COURSE DATA-CREDIT TYPE and Glossary entries CREDIT HOURS and CREDIT COURSE STUDENTS.]

CREDIT COURSE STUDENT A student enrolled in (1) at least one CREDIT COURSE, or (2) at least one course which generates EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS, such as REQUIRED NON- CREDIT COURSES, or NON-CREDIT COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS.

CREDIT ENROLLMENT STATUS
The status of a student is one of the following-- 1) All credit course students other than in the categories below. (Default) 2) Special student - EOP/SEEK student. 3) Special Student - other Risk Admission students (State Operated/Funded Only) Special Student - EOP/SEEK eligible but not receiving EOP/SEEK assistance (Community Colleges only) 4) Student from another college in a study abroad program administered by your institution. 5) Student from another college involved in cross- registration. 6) Student from another college involved in accessory instruction. 7) EXCHANGE STUDENT from abroad [SDF element 13, ADF element 6]

CREDIT HOURS
The number of academic units assigned to a credit course. [See SDF element 28.7 COURSE DATA-CREDIT VALUE and 28.8 COURSE DATA-CREDIT TYPE.] (Synonymous with CREDIT VALUE) Credit hours should be calculated in accordance with Memorandum to Presidents, Vol. 76, No. 8, "Credit/Contract Hour Relationship"; this memorandum is printed in the Appendix. In summary form, the relationship between class hours and credit hours over a term is as follows: (1) If the method of instruction is lecture, seminar, quiz, discussion or recitation, then one class contact hour per week per term would be awarded one credit hour. (2) If the method of instruction involves activity supervised as a group such as laboratory, field trip, practicum, workshop or group studies, then three class contact hours per week per term would be awarded one credit hour unless the activity requires substantial outside preparation by the student in which case two class contact hours per week per term would be awarded one credit hour. (3) In the case of supervised individual activity, such as independent study, individual studio and tutorial, calculate credit hours as follows: (a) for independent study defined as study given initial guidance, criticism, review and evaluation by a faculty member, the equivalent of three student academic activity hours per week per term would be awarded one credit hour; (b) for tutorial study defined as study which is given initial faculty guidance followed by repeated, regularly scheduled individual student conferences with a faculty member and periodic as well as final evaluation one instructional contact hour per week per term would be awarded one credit hour. (4) If the student is engaged in independent activity which is essentially full-time, as in the case of student teaching, then each week of work would be the equivalent of one credit hour. Note: See Equivalent Credit Hours for non-credit instructional activities which generate state aidable Full- Time Equivalent Workload.

CREDIT HOURS PRODUCED
The total number of CREDIT HOURS for which CREDIT COURSE STUDENTS are enrolled. Exclude credit hours produced solely by examination, granted for experimental learning or received for any activities which do not involve enrollment in a course. (See CREDIT COURSE STUDENTS.)

CREDIT TYPE
A code which indicates the type of credit for a given course; the following codes are used: I -Those courses which can be used to meet the requirements of a formal award at your institution except for those courses coded as , C, D, , X W, O or H below. W -Those courses for which tuition has been waived under agreements with employee bargaining units. N -Non-credit courses which are neither developmental nor remedial for which credit has been imputed in accordance with the policies and conditions described under EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS. D -Non-credit developmental courses for which credit has been imputed in accordance with the policies and conditions described under EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS. R -Non-credit remedial courses for which credit has been imputed in accordance with the policies and conditions described under EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS. C -Contract Course Credit Hours (State-operated colleges only) or (for Community Colleges) those credit courses supported by account CC2423. X -Cross Registration Course taken by your student and taught by another institution. H -(State Operated/Funded campuses only) Courses that are taught during a separately budgeted summer session. These courses are self-supporting and the credit hours will be excluded from the state funded O - Courses associated with SUNY students studying abroad as part of an approved Overseas Academic Program. These programs are self-supporting and consequently, these credit hours are excluded from the state funded FTE. [CASA element 16, SDF element 28.8]

CREDIT VALUE (CRV)
Credit value refers to the number of credit hours awarded through the course in progress toward a degree, certificate, or other formal award. Certain courses, including physical education, follow special rules for the assignment of credit value. [CASA element 15, SDF element 28.7]

CROSS REGISTRATION
A cooperative arrangement between colleges that allows a full-time matriculated undergraduate student to receive instruction and obtain academic credit for courses administered by an institution other than the students home institution. These arrangements are to be established on a quid pro quo basis. (See Cross- Registration Guidelines in Supporting Documents.) State-Operated Institutions: when the home institution State-Operated college, the college will receive FTE workload for teaching cross-registered students from another college, but will not receive FTE workload for the instruction given to their students by another college. Community Colleges: when the home institution is a community college, the community college will receive the FTE workload for their students, even though another college is doing the teaching. A community college, however, will not receive FTE workload for instruction they provide to cross registered students from another college.

CURRICULUM CODE
The curriculum code is a five position numeric code which is a synonym for the program title. It comprises position five through nine of the Program Identifier field defined below . [SDF element 15.3, ADF element 22.3]

Back to Top

 



- D -

DATE OF BIRTH
Student's date of birth in MMDDYY format. [SDF element 5, ADF element 3]

(PRIOR ) DEGREES EARNED
A field within the Student Data File for recording all prior degrees held by a student whose HOME INSTITUTION is your institution. The following codes are used for each degree A AAS G Graduate Certificate B AOS H Doctoral degree C AA J Other degrees or formal awards D AS K No degree (used only if a E. Bachelor's Degree student has no degree) F Master's Degree L Unknown [SDF element 12, ADF element 10]

DISADVANTAGED STUDENT
A student who is eligible for supplemental financial assistance in Education Opportunity Programs under criteria established by the State University of New York, pursuant to section 6452 of the Education Law and Subpart 27-2 of Part 27 of Chapter of Title 8 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York (Rules of the Board of Regents). This definition applies irrespective of whether or not the institution has such an Education Opportunity Programs, or whether the individual is receiving such funds. (See Section of Supporting Documents of Glossary)

DISCIPLINE
A discipline is a broad area of knowledge used to group courses into a few categories for general reporting. Each course is assigned to a discipline specialty within the taxonomy cited below. Courses are coded by each institution based upon their content. Thus, discipline code describes the area of knowledge of the course and is not necessarily directly related to the academic unit offering the course, no the degree program which requires it, nor the background of the students taking the course. Reference: Huff, Robert A. A Taxonomy of Instructional Programs in Higher Education, U. S. Government Printing Office, Catalog No. HE5.250:50064, Washington, D.C., 1970. The HEGIS codes were expanded by the Central Staff Office of Institutional Research so that SUNY institutions could specifically code the content of courses which otherwise would have to be reported as XX99, Other. The more than 500 discipline specialties are combined into the following nineteen broad discipline groups specifically serving State University's need for summarization: Discipline Categories 1. Biological Sciences and Health Professions 2. Business and Management 3. Education 4. Fine and Applied Arts 5. Foreign Languages and Letters 6. Mathematics and Computer Science 7. Physical Sciences and Engineering 8. Psychology 9. Social Sciences 10. Other 11. Agricultural and Natural Science Technologies 12. Business and Commerce Technologies 13. Communication, Printed Media and Design Technologies 14. Data Processing Technologies 15. Education Technologies 16. Foods and Home Economics Related Technologies 17. Health Services and Paramedical Technologies 18. Mechanical Engineering and Agricultural Engineering Technologies 19. Public Service Related Technologies. Only the first ten categories are used to summarize the activity of the senior institutions. A different grouping of the discipline specialties is used to summarize the activity of the Agricultural and Technical Colleges, necessitating the use of all nineteen categories. Additionally, the APIS system classifies academic majors by the original (unexpanded) HEGIS taxonomic system, as well as the newer CIP (Classification of Instructional Programs) taxonomy, both of which were devised by the federal department of education. As the academic major is an attribute of both enrolled students and degree recipients, both of these taxonomies may be invoked to categorize students on either the Student Data File or the Automated Degree File.

Back to Top

 




- E -

E.O.P. STUDENTS
Educationally and economically disadvantaged students who receive financial support from funds allocated by the State University Central Administration Office of Special Programs from an Equal Opportunity Program (also called S.E.E.K.) appropriation established by the Legislature. Also include students receiving the other special services paid for by this special appropriation. such as tutoring. remedial courses. counseling. etc. [See SDF element 13 CREDIT ENROLLMENT STATUS and glossary item SPECIAL STUDENT, as well as SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS addendum to this glossary.]

EOP STUDENTS (ELIGIBLE BUT NOT RECEIVING E.O.P. FUNDS): (Community Colleges only):
Educationally and economically disadvantaged students who are eligible to receive financial support from funds allocated by the State University Central Administration Office of Special Programs from an Equal Opportunity Program (also called S.E.E.K) appropriation established by the Legislature entry below, E.O.P. STUDENTS), but who are not receiving such funds, either because they are not in such an Equal Opportunity Program, or because such a program is not offered at their institution.

EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS
Imputed credit hours used for workload calculations for certain instructional activities which generate workload but do not generate academic credits. At both State Operated/Funded campuses and Community Colleges this would include 1) REQUIRED NON- CREDIT COURSES, such as physical education, musical ensemble, theater stage craft, etc., and 2) Non-credit remedial or developmental courses, such as NON-CREDIT COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS. Equivalent credit hours are to be calculated in accordance with Memorandum to Presidents, Vol. 91, No. 2, "Credit Equivalency for Non- Credit Instruction". In summary form, the relationship between class hours and equivalent credit hours is as follows: (1) Educational activities structured as typical classroom courses (including developmental and remedial courses) would be accounted for on a standard one for one basis, i. e. one class contact hour per week per term is awarded one credit hour. (2) A laboratory component, typically related to a lecture, is counted on a three for one basis, i. e. three class contact hours per week per term are awarded one credit hour. (3) Learning Centers, available for the individualized instruction of the student under the supervision of instructional employees, are counted on a two for one basis, i. e. two class contact hours per week per term are awarded one credit hour. (4) Practice Centers, available for the casual use of the student on an as-needed basis, do not generate any equivalent credit hours. Please refer to Memorandum to Presidents, Vol. 91, No. 2 (found in SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS addendum to this glossary) for a complete description of these terms.

EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
Those overseas Academic Programs in which a SUNY institution and a foreign institution agree to "swap" students with no net change in the overall institutional workload. In effect, the institutions trade credit hours. Although exchange programs continue to be regularly funded, to be consistent with University workload policy, campuses will need to exclude the FTE workload of the SUNY students going abroad.

EXCHANGE STUDENT
A student enrolled in an overseas exchange program.

Back to Top

 




- F -

FIRST-TIME STUDENT
A student who has not been previously enrolled at any college or university and who is enrolled for the first time at your institution this term. A student whose previous post-secondary education was only at a non- collegiate institution such as a business school or technical institute is a first-time student, unless your institution expects to give college credit for such activities in which case the student is a TRANSFER STUDENT. A student who meets the above conditions GLOSSARY OF TERMS GLOSSARY OF TERMS and is concurrently enrolled in high school is a first-time student. A student enrolled in a higher education institution for the first time during a summer term is not a first-time student in the following fall term; however, if your institution considers such a student first-time in the Fall, then he may be reported as first-time here. This exception is subject to the restriction that a student may be reported as first-time only once. [See SDF element 10 HIGHER EDUCATION HISTORY.]

FOREIGN STUDENT A student who is neither a citizen of the United States nor holds Permanent Residence Status. (A student who holds Permanent Residence Status is not considered a foreign student. [See SDF element 9 PERMANENT RESIDENCE.]

FORMER INSTITUTION An element on the Student Data File which gives the code of a former institution attended in the case of a TRANSFER STUDENT or of the HOME INSTITUTION of a cross registered student. [SDF element 11, ADF element 9

FRESHMAN a. Bachelor's Level Programs - a STUDENT IN A BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed fewer than one-fourth of his/her PROGRAM'S credit requirements. Because credit requirements vary from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating freshmen from SOPHOMORES may also differ from program to program. b. Non-bachelor's Level Programs- a STUDENT IN A DIPLOMA, CERTIFICATE or ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed less than one full academic year or its equivalent. Because credit requirements vary from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating freshman from SOPHOMORES may also differ from program to program. All students in diploma or certificate programs of one year or less will be considered freshman. [See SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID and element 16 STUDENT LEVEL.]

FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT WORKLOAD (FTE WKLD) FTE workload is a unit of measure usually derived from student credit hours. One FTE workload is equivalent to 15 student credit hours in undergraduate courses, or 12 student credit hours in graduate courses. Health first-professional and doctoral student FTEs are calculated as follows: one FTE for first professionals in the health sciences, one FTE for full- time ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS, 0.75 FTE for part-time ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS. [CASA]

FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY (FTE Faculty) Like full-time equivalent workload, FTE faculty is a unit of measure to equate faculty appointments of various fractions of full- time status to full-time appointments. Full-time faculty equal one F . Part-time faculty appointment fractions are accumulated to an equivalency of full-time appointments. The full-time or part-time status of faculty is generally defined by contract and for purposes here is extracted from appropriate personnel records. Special procedures exist for imputing an FTE for temporary service faculty, contributed service staff, etc. [CASA]

FULL-TIME STUDENT a. Full-time undergraduate-- an UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT who is enrolled for 12 or more CREDIT HOURS. b. Full-time graduate-- a GRADUATE STUDENT who is enrolled for 9 or more CREDIT HOURS. In determining full-time status, EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS imputed to non-credit courses are included in addition to those credit hours in standard credit courses; see glossary entries CREDIT COURSE, REQUIRED NON-CREDIT COURSE, NON- CREDIT COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS, CREDIT HOURS, and EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS. [The identification of students as full (or part)-time is derived from SDF elements 16 STUDENT LEVEL and 28.7 COURSE DATA-CREDIT VALUE.]

Back to Top

 




- G -

GRADUATE STUDENT A student who is: (1) in a graduate program, or (2) not in a graduate program but has been accepted by your institution for graduate study in the current term, or (3) not in a graduate program but holds a bachelor's degree and is enrolled in at least one graduate level credit course for post-graduate credit.

GRADUATE STUDENT (NOT IN PROGRAM) A student who is: (1) not in a graduate program but has been accepted by your institution for graduate study in the current term, or (2) not in a graduate program but holds a bachelor's degree and is enrolled in at least one graduate level credit course for post-graduate credit.

Back to Top

 




- H -

HANDICAPPED STUDENTS (STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES) Students who are mobility impaired, visually impaired, acoustically impaired, or having any of the following handicapping conditions. The following definitions of impairment categories are those provided by the State Education Department: Mobility Impairment: A mobility impaired person is any person who must use a standard manual or electric wheelchair or other assistive device (crutches, braces, etc.) to move from place to place. Visual Impairment: A visually impaired person is any person who, even with correction, adversely affects that individual's educational performance. Acoustical Impairment: An acoustically impaired person is any person with a hearing impairment, whether permanent or fluctuating, which adversely affects the individual's educational performance. Learning Disabled: A student with a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which manifests itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations. The term includes such conditions as perceptual handicaps, brain injury, neurological impairment, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not include students who have learning problems which are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbance, or of environmental, cultural, educational or economic disadvantage. Emotional Disturbance: A student with an inability to learn which cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory or health factors and who exhibits one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree: (1) an inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers; (2) inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances; (3) a generally pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression; or (4) a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems. The term does not include socially maladjusted students unless it is determined that they have an emotional disturbance. Speech-impairment: A student with a communication disorder, such as stuttering, impaired articulation, a language impairment or voice impairment, which adversely affects the student's educational performance. Traumatic brain injury: A student with an injury caused by an external physical force or by certain medical conditions such as stroke, encephalitis, aneurysm, anoxia or brain tumors with resulting impairments that adversely affect educational performance. The term includes open or closed head injuries from certain medical conditions resulting in mild, moderate or severe impairments in one or more areas, including cognition, language, memory, attention, reasoning, abstract thinking, judgment, problem solving, sensory, perceptual and motor abilities, psychosocial behavior, physical functions, information processing, and speech. The term does not include injuries that are congenital or caused by birth trauma. Orthopedic impairment: A student who has a physical disability or who has a severe orthopedic impairment, which adversely affects a student's educational performance. The term includes impairments caused by congenital anomaly (e.g., clubfoot, absence of some member, etc.) impairments caused by disease (e.g., poliomyelitis, bone tuberculosis, etc.), and impairments from other causes (e.g., cerebral palsy, amputation, and fractures or burns which cause contractures). Other health-impairment: A student who has a physical disability and who has limited strength, vitality or alertness due to chronic or acute health problems, including but not limited to a heart condition, tuberculosis, rheumatic fever, nephritis, asthma, sickle anemia, AIDS, hemophilia, epilepsy, lead poisoning, leukemia, diabetes or tourette syndrome, which adversely affects that individual's educational performance.

HEADCOUNT The number of different students, an unduplicated count. Examples or duplication to be avoided are: students enrolled concurrently in on-campus and off-campus courses, students enrolled concurrently in day and evening programs which have separate registration procedures. Do not report class registrations.

HEGIS (Higher Education General Information System) TAXONOMY OF DISCIPLINE DIVISIONS A taxonomy of 30 academic disciplines which can be used to classify either courses or academic majors. The taxonomy is further refined by a second tier of subcategories within each major division. For a complete listing of the HEGIS taxonomy, see the SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS addendum to this glossary. (See also DISCIPLINE, CIP TAXONOMY OF DISCIPLINE DIVISIONS)

HIGH SCHOOL STATUS [SDF element 20]

HIGHER EDUCATION HISTORY A code used to indicate the status of a given student at your institution during the current semester. The following codes are used: Code Description : 1. UNDERGRADUATE, FIRST-TIME 2. UNDERGRADUATE, TRANSFER 3. UNDERGRADUATE, CONTINUING 4. UNDERGRADUATE, RETURNING 5. NEW GRADUATE STUDENT 6. GRADUATE STUDENT CONTINUING 7. GRADUATE STUDENT RETURNING 8. Unknown (seldom used) [SDF element 1Q ADF element 8.]

HOME INSTITUTION That institution which is the institution of primary registration for each student attending a S.U.N.Y. institution. In most cases your institution will be the home institution of the students you report. In a few instances you will be reporting students for whom your institution is not the student's home institution, viz., 1) students from another institution attending your institution under an authorized cross registration program, 2) students from another institution enrolled in an Overseas Academic Program administered by your institution, and 3) students from another institution engaged in accessory instruction (College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse and the Statutory Colleges at Cornell and Alfred Only).

Back to Top

 




- I -

IN PROGRAM, MAJOR NOT CHOSEN A student enrolled at your institution who has matriculated (if applicable) or is considered by the institution to be currently pursuing a specific type of degree (such as associate, bachelors, masters, etc.), but who has not yet chosen (or is eligible to choose) a major field of study.

INCOME FUND REIMBURSABLE CREDIT COURSES (State- operated/Funded institutions only) - See SUTRA

INSTRUCTION TYPE The primary instructional mode of a section is classified from the following: lecture, seminar, recitation, laboratory or other group activity, tutorial, independent study and programmed instruction. A section is classified as using programmed type of instruction if there is generally no instructor expected, scheduled, or present; e.g., television courses, computer-assisted instruction, etc. A section has a single type of instruction but a course may be a composite of several types of instruction. Each time the mode of instruction changes, a new section is assigned to the course even when the same group of students is participating. [CASA element 12]

Back to Top

 



- J -

JUNIOR A STUDENT IN BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed fewer than three-fourths but at least one-half of his/her PROGRAM'S credit requirements. Because credit requirements differ from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating juniors from SOPHOMORES and SENIORS may also differ from program to program. [See SDF element 16 STUDENT LEVEL]

Back to Top



- K -

Back to Top

 



- L -

LOCATION  

A code used to indicate where a student takes the courses for which he/she is enrolled. (See ON-CAMPUS COURSES, ON-CAMPUS STUDENT, OFF-CAMPUS COURSES, OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT, STUDY ABROAD, and STUDENT INMATES OF CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES.) [SDF element 141


LOWER DIVISION STUDENT (IN PROGRAM) a. In a Bachelor's Program-a STUDENT IN BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed fewer than one-half of his/her PROGRAM'S credit requirements. Because credit requirements may vary from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating lower division students from UPPER DIVISION STUDENTS may also differ from program to program.

b. In Programs Below the Bachelor's Level-an UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT IN DIPLOMA, CERTIFICATE or ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM is always reported as a lower division student.

LOWER DIVISION STUDENT (NOT IN A PROGRAM) a. Four-year institutions--if your institution uses a credit hour criterion to separate lower and upper division students in a program, then that same criterion should be used to divide students who are not in a program into lower and upper divisions. If your institutions does not use a credit hour criterion, then a lower division student is an undergraduate student who has completed 56 or fewer semester hours (or 84 or less quarter hours).

b. Two-year institutions--all not-in-a-program students are lower division.

[See SDF element 16 HIGHER EDUCATION HISTORY.]

Back to Top

 



- M -

MATRICULATION DATE The beginning date of the earliest semester in which the student was reported as either enrolled in a specific program (major field) of study, or reported as being "in a program, major not chosen". That is, for purposes of establishing this date, do not consider terms for which the student was reported as "not in a program." [ADF element 20]

Back to Top

 



- N -

NEWLY ENROLLED YEAR'S GRADUATE STUDENTS  

A GRADUATE STUDENT whose first enrollment as a graduate student at your institution occurred before the close of registration in the current fall term and after the close of registration in the fall term of the previous year, e.g., registrations occurred before the close of registration in Fall 1992 and after the close in Fall 1991.
NEW GRADUATE STUDENT (or NEW TO YOUR INSTITUTION GRADUATE STUDENT) A GRADUATE STUDENT whose first enrollment as a graduate student at your institution occurs during the current term. [See SDF element 16 STUDENT LEVEL.]

NEW YORK RESIDENT A student who is a citizen of the United States or holds PERMANENT RESIDENCE status and whose PERMANENT RESIDENCE, for purposes of determining tuition charges, is in New York State. See Appendix entry "Revised Policy on Residency for Tuition Purposes at the State- Operated Campus." For Community College, residency can be determined in relation to charge-back status, see Section 6301 of the Education Law.

NON-CREDIT COURSE STUDENT A Student enrolled only in NON- CREDIT COURSES which are neither required non-credit nor non-credit for special students; i.e., those which are not defined as CREDIT COURSE STUDENT.

NON-CREDIT COURSES Courses offered by your institution which cannot qualify under the definition of a CREDIT COURSE; i.e., those for which regular college credit is not awarded and which cannot be used to meet the requirements for a degree, diploma or certificate awarded by your institution. NON-CREDIT COURSES; STATE AIDABLE (Community Colleges only)that subgroup of NON-CREDIT COURSES which, for Community Colleges only, are eligible for State-operating budget aid, specifically, non-credit instruction which is: (a) remedial (This is the only category which is still state aidable) (b) vocational preparation (c) community service and continuing education Categories (B) and (C), which were formerly state-aidable no longer receive formula funding as of the 1991-92 and 1990-91 academic years, respectively. The eligible instruction is defined as follows. (a) Remedial Instruction--instruction concerned with diagnosing, correcting or improving such basic skills as oral and written communications, reading, analytical concepts and general study habits and patterns to overcome in part or in whole any particular marked deficiency which interferes with a student's ability to pursue an education objective effectively. (b) Vocational Preparation--courses designed to provide education, training or retraining in one or more semi- skilled, skilled, technical or other occupational categories to prepare the student for entrance into a particular chosen vocation, upgrading of present employment opportunity or achievement of other career goals (c) Community Service--an educational program activity or service designed to assist in the solution of community problems, or aid in the development and maintenance of desirable social conditions in a locality. See Appendix entry "Approval of Non-Credit Courses for State Support" for additional information regarding non- credit courses eligible for state aid.

NON-CREDIT COURSE FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS Instructional activities which normally do not carry credit and which are designed to serve the needs of students who might be called "risk admissions" or SPECIAL STUDENTS. [See SDF element 28.8 COURSE DATA-CREDIT TYPE)

NOT IN PROGRAM A student enrolled at your institution to take certain credit courses, but who has neither formally matriculated nor is considered by the institution to be currently pursuing a specific type of degree (such as associate, bachelors, masters, etc.). (See Lower Division Student, Not in a Program and Upper Division Student, Not In A Program)

Back to Top



- O -

OFF-CAMPUS COURSES Those taught at instructional locations other than at the central location or locations of an institution. [See SDF element 14 Location.]

OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT One who takes no ON-CAMPUS COURSES, (in day or evening sessions) but who is enrolled for one or more courses at an instructional location away from the central location of an institution. [ SDF element 14 LOCATION.]

ON-CAMPUS COURSES Those taught at the central location or locations of an institution. Courses that do not meet regularly, such as "Thesis", should be considered on-campus courses. Courses that take the student away from the main campus, either for part or for all of a term, should be considered on-campus courses (e.g. student teaching or social casework practice) except for STUDY ABROAD

ACTIVITIES. (See SDF element 14 LOCATION.]


ON-CAMPUS STUDENT One who is enrolled in one or more ON- CAMPUS COURSES, whether in the day or evening. It is not necessary to live on campus to be an on-campus student. [See SDF Element 14 LOCATION.]

OVERSEAS ACADEMIC PROGRAM See glossary entry STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM

Back to Top

 



- P -

PART-TIME STUDENT a. Part-time Undergraduate--an UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT who is enrolled for fewer than 12 CREDIT HOURS.

b. Part-time Graduate--a GRADUATE STUDENT who is enrolled for fewer than 9 CREDIT HOURS.

In determining part-time status, EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS imputed to non-credit courses are included in addition to those credit hours in standard credit courses. See glossary items CREDIT COURSE, REQUIRED NON-CREDIT COURSE, NON-CREDIT COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS, EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS, and CREDIT HOURS.

[The identification of students as full (or part)-time is derived from SDF element 16 STUDENT LEVEL and 28.7 COURSE DATA-CREDIT VALUE.]


PERMANENT RESIDENCE Generally the county, state or country of which the student is a legal resident for purposes of determining tuition charges. For specific information, see glossary entries FOREIGN STUDENT and NEW YORK RESIDENT. A student's current address would not be his permanent residence if he is residing there mainly for the purpose of attending your institution. See Appendix entry "Revised Policy on Residency for Tuition Purpose at the State- Operated Campus." [See SDF element 9 PERMANENT RESIDENCE, ADF element 5]

POSTDOCTORAL STUDENT Student who will generally meet these criteria: they hold Ph.D., Ed.D., D.Sci., M.D., D.V.M., D.D.S., O.D., or equivalent earned degrees and are at your institution primarily for the development of their ability or scholarship. Exclude students who are candidates for a degree at your institution registered in CREDIT COURSES or special refresher courses such as "Post Graduate Day in Otorhinolaryngology", or hold a position with academic rank at your institution.

PROGRAM A course of study leading to a formal award given by your institution, such as a degree, diploma or certificate. (For a listing of programs your institution is authorized to offer see Student Data File Manual Appendix C, which is issued at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters.)

PROGRAM IDENTIFIER Each program which your institution is authorized to offer has a unique key consisting of 9 numerals and five alphabetic characters. (Note that a special key has been provided for students who are not in a program.) These identifiers are kept within the APIS system and the appropriate identifiers for each institution are listed in Appendix C of the Student Data File manual, which is issued at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. [SDF element 15]

Back to Top

 

 



- Q -

QUALITY POINT AVERAGE [SDF element 18, ADF element 15]

Back to Top

 



- R -

REQUIRED NON-CREDIT COURSE A course which does not carry CREDIT HOURS and which is required by your institution. (See glossary entries CREDIT COURSE STUDENT, EQUIVALENT CREDIT HOURS and CREDIT HOURS).

RETURNING STUDENTS a. UNDERGRADUATE--an UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT in the current term who has been enrolled at your institution, but was not enrolled in the previous term. In the case of the fall term, "previous term" shall include both the previous summer and spring terms; e.g., an UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT in the Fall of 1992 is a returning student if he/she was previously enrolled at your institution but in neither the Spring 1992 nor Summer 1992 terms.

b. GRADUATE--A GRADUATE STUDENT in the current term who has been enrolled as a GRADUATE STUDENT at your institution, but was not enrolled as a GRADUATE STUDENT in the previous term. In the case of the fall term, "previous term" shall include both the previous summer and spring terms; e.g., a GRADUATE STUDENT in the Fall of 1992 is a returning student if he/she was previously enrolled as a GRADUATE STUDENT at your institution but in neither the Spring 1992 nor Summer 1992 terms.

[See SDF element 10 HIGHER EDUCATION HISTORY.]

Back to Top


- S -

SECTION A section is a group of students assembled for instruction in regularly required meetings wherein the instructional mode is fixed. For example, a group of students meeting on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for lectures is a single section. A separate section is identified for each different type of instruction even through the same group of students is involved. Therefore, a single group of students meeting Monday and Wednesday for lectures and on Friday for a laboratory constitute two sections. A section is identified as having a single instructional mode. When the instructional mode is tutorial, each student is regarded as a separate section because the instructor meets with individual students separately. [CASA]

SENIOR A STUDENT [ A BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed three-fourths of more of his/her PROGRAM'S credit requirements. Students in their fifth year of a five-year bachelor's degree program should be reported as seniors. Because credit requirements differ from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating seniors from JUNIORS may also vary from program to program. [See SDF element 16 STUDENT LEVEL]

SEX Gender [SDF element 7, ADF element 18]

SHORT CREDIT COURSES Courses which begin after the CENSUS DATE for a given term.

SOPHOMORE: a. Bachelor's level programs-a STUDENT IN A BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed fewer than one-half but at least one-forth of his/her PROGRAM'S credit requirements. Because credit requirements may differ from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating sophomores from FRESHMEN and JUNIORS may also vary from program to program.

b. Non-bachelor's level programs-a STUDENT IN A DIPLOMA, CERTIFICATE or ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed at least one full academic year or its equivalent. Because credit requirements vary from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating sophomores from FRESHMAN may also differ from program to program. All students in diploma or certificate programs of one year or less will be considered FRESHMEN, not sophomores. [See SDF element 16 STUDENT LEVEL.]

SPECIAL STUDENTS Undergraduate CREDIT COURSE STUDENTS in S.E.E.K., E.O.P., or other activities designed to serve students who might be called "risk admissions." [See SDF element 13 CREDIT ENROLLMENT STATUS.]

STUDENT CREDIT HOURS (SCRH) OR TOTAL CREDIT ENROLLMENT It is the sum of the credits that all students, full and part- time, are registered for at the fall semester. SCRH = CRV*ENROLLMENT

STUDENT DATA FILE (SDF) State University's automated student information system. This is a unit record reporting system containing demographic and registration data for individual students.

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO This ratio is calculated by dividing the full-time equivalent student workload by the full-time equivalent faculty. (S/F = FTE WKLD/FTE Faculty) [CASA]

STUDENT ID An element in the Student Data File and Automated Degree File to uniquely identify each student (social security number or its simulated equivalent for those who don't have one). [SDF element 2, ADF element 1]

STUDENT IN AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who has met the requirements for admission to an associate degree PROGRAM S who is this term carrying out a planned sequence of courses toward that degree. Include students in this category even though they may have not yet chosen a specific field of study or may be attending PART- TIME. [See SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID.]

STUDENT IN A BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who has met the requirements for admission to a bachelor's degree PROGRAM and who is this term carrying out a planned sequence of courses toward that degree. Include students in this category even though they may not yet have chosen a specific field of study or may be attending PART- TIME. [See SDF Element 15 PROGRAM ID.]

STUDENT IN A DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAM A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who has met the requirements for admission to a doctoral degree PROGRAM (except students in D.D.S., D.V.M., J.D., M.D., Phar.D., and O.D. degree program) and who is this term carrying out a planned sequence of courses leading to a doctoral degree. Include students in this category even though they may be attending PART-TIME. [See SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID.]

STUDENT IN A FIRST-PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who has met the requirements for admission to D.D.S., D.V.M., J.D., M.D., Phar.D., or O.D. programs and who is this term carrying out a planned sequence of courses leading to one of these degrees. Include students in this category even though they may be attending PART- TIME. [See SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID.]

STUDENT IN GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who has met the requirements for admission to a "Certificate of Advance Study" program and who is this term carrying out a planned sequence of courses leading to a graduate certificate. [See SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID.]

STUDENT IN A MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAM A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who has met the requirements for admission to a master's degree PROGRAM and who is this term carrying out a planned sequence of course toward a master's degree. Include students in this category even though they may not have been admitted to "candidacy" or may be attending PART- TIME. [See SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID.]

STUDENT IN AN UNDERGRADUATE DIPLOMA OR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who has met the requirements for admission to a diploma or certificate PROGRAM which requires one or more terms of full-time work or its equivalent. Such a student must also be this term carrying out a planned sequence of courses leading to a diploma or certificate awarded by your institution. Include students in this category even though they may be attending PART- TIME. [See SDF element 15 PROGRAM ID.]

STUDENT INMATES OF CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES Credit course students at your institution who are currently inmates of a correctional facility.

STUDENT LEVEL The level of a given student is given as one of the following- UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT FRESHMAN SOPHOMORE LOWER DIVISION, NOT IN A PROGRAM JUNIOR SENIOR UPPER DIVISION, NOT IN A PROGRAM GRADUATE STUDENT Fewer than 24 credit hours completed beyond the Bachelor's degree 24 or more credit hours completed beyond the Bachelor's degree FIRST PROFESSIONAL in first year of study FIRST PROFESSIONAL beyond first year of study [CASA, SDF element 16]

STUDENT NAME [SDF element 4, ADF element 2]

STUDENT SCHEDULE CHANGE PROCESS: The normal process of adding or dropping courses early in the academic term during which adjustments are made to student course schedules. This shall take place before the CENSUS DATE. Local campus policies concerning course withdrawal as they relate to grading practices shall not be affected.

STUDENT VETERAN A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who is a military veteran enrolled at your institution who is receiving veterans benefits for which your institution must certify his/her enrollment.

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS (i) STATE-OPERATED/FUNDED INSTITUTIONS ONLY Overseas Academic Programs including exchange programs for which students earn CREDIT HOURS (See also EXCHANGE STUDENT.). There are two different study abroad populations. This is because students must register at their home campus for overseas programs even though some other S.U.N.Y. college may administer the program. Therefore:

a. There is a study abroad enrollment of those students regularly enrolled at your institution who are registered for any S.U.N.Y. sponsored study abroad program (including your own programs). For manual reporting, these students should be reported on the basic headcount forms (Series 1) as appropriate.

b. The other study abroad population is made up of those students from any S.U.N.Y. college (including your own) who are in an overseas academic program administered by your institution. (For manual reporting, this population is reported on the Series 13 forms.)

(ii) COMMUNITY COLLEGES ONLY - Overseas Academic Programs for which students earn CREDIT HOURS. For manual reporting, students and credit hours are reported on forms as follows:

a. All credit course students who are enrollees of your institution as reported on Form 1C; this includes your credit courses enrollees who are in a study abroad program. Headcounts and credit hours of these students are both reported on Form 1C.

b. Those enrollees in a study abroad program who are reported on Form 1C are also reported on Form lC.1, line 2.

c. All students who are in a study abroad program administered by your institution should be reported on Form 13C regardless of home institution. Students reported on 13C who are not enrollees of your institution should = be reported on 1C or lC.1.

SUBCAMPUS A code used to group data according to components of the institution. [CASA, Element 24, SDF element 3, ADF element 14]

SUPPLEMENTAL STATE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE (Community Colleges only) A Supplemental State Financial assistance for community colleges for each full-time equivalent student enrolled in a TECHNICAL PROGRAM and for each full- time equivalent student enrolled in a BUSINESS PROGRAM. Following are definitions of technical programs and business programs. (For the complete text of the definitions of technical programs and business programs and supporting materials see Appendix entry, "Technical and Business Programs Eligible for Supplemental State Financial Assistance.")

SUTRA (State University Tuition Reimbursable Account) State-Operated campuses only: SUTRA comprises four separate credit bearing income fund reimbursable types of activities: -Summer Session (self supporting) -Overseas Academic Programs (excluding EXCHANGE STUDENTS) -Contract Courses (see CONTRACT COURSES) -Academic Year (Fall/Spring) overflow enrollment - See Policy Addendum II April 19, 1993, Section 7 of Supporting Documents of Glossary [See also SDF element 28.8 COURSE DATA - CREDIT TYPE]

Back to Top



- T -

TECHNICAL PROGRAMS Technical programs are defined as follows: (I) All Certificate and Diploma programs in the sciences and technologies but excluding all business programs.

(ii) All Associate in Sciences (A S.) programs but excluding any in liberal art and general studies and also excluding all business programs.

(iii) All Associate in Applied Science (AS.) programs but excluding al business programs.

(iv) All Associate in Occupational Studies (A O.S.) programs, but excluding all business programs.

BUSINESS PROGRAMS: Business programs are defined as follows:

(i) All Certificate and Diploma programs in business.

(ii) All Associate in Science (A S.) programs in business.

(iii) All Associate in Applied Science (A A.S.) programs in business.

(iv) All Associate in Occupational Studies (A.O.S.) programs in business.

TRANSFER STUDENT An UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT who is enrolled at your institution for the first time in the current term, but who has attended other colleges or universities prior to the current term. The actual number of CREDIT HOURS he/she is allowed to transfer is not relevant to the distinction between a transfer student and a FIRST-TIME STUDENT, even if no credits were ultimately transferable. A nursing student in a bachelor's degree program who upon admission is given advanced standing for previous clinical or academic training should be counted as a transfer student. A student who has only changed his/her field of study without changing institutions is not a transfer student as here defined. A student whose previous post- secondary education is only at a non-collegiate institution such as a business school or technical institution should be considered FIRST-TIME STUDENT; unless your institution expects to give credit for such activities, in which case the student is a transfer student. Students who move from one level of study to another level at the same institution(e.g. from an associates degree program to a bachelor's degree program) are not to be considered transfer students. [See SDF element 10 HIGHER EDUCATION HISTORY.]

Back to Top

 



- U -

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT A CREDIT COURSE STUDENT who is (1) in an undergraduate program, or (2) not in a program, not accepted by your institution for graduate study in the current term and does not have a graduate degree, or (3) not in a program, not accepted by your institution for graduate study in the current term, holds a bachelor's degree and is taking only undergraduate courses. [See SDF elements 10 HIGHER EDUCATION HISTORY, 12 DEGREES EARNED, and 16 STUDENT LEVEL.]

UNIT COST Four types of unit costs are defined to assist in making cost comparisons for various purposes. The salary unit cost is conveniently thought of as the annual faculty salary divided by the total number of credit hours attempted in the courses taught by this faculty member. The support unit cost generally refers to the remaining departmental expenditures after instructional salaries are removed. Support costs are unitized by the same divisor, i.e., student credit hours. Direct costs for the Instruction and Departmental Research teaching department are obtained from addition of the salary and support unit costs. A fourth type of cost is called "Other & DR Support". Dean's accounts and other Instruction and Departmental Research departments not offering instruction are omitted from all standard CASA cost calculations. Inasmuch as these accounts do support the instructional process, it is appropriate to include their expenditures when examining the different sources of teaching support. These "Other Costs" appear in summary form only for all disciplines and all courses on Report 1 of the Statistical Abstracts. [CASA]

UPPER DIVISION STUDENT (IN A PROGRAM) A STUDENT IN A BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM who has completed one-half or more of his/her PROGRAM'S credit requirements. Because credit requirements may differ from program to program, the number of accumulated credits separating upper division students from LOWER DIVISION STUDENTS may also differ from program to program. An UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT in a diploma or certificate program is always to be reported as a LOWER DIVISION STUDENT. [See SDF element 16 STUDENT LEVEL.]

UPPER DIVISION STUDENT (NOT IN A PROGRAM) a. Four-year institutions--if your institution uses a credit hour criterion to separate lower and upper division students in a program, then use that same criterion to separate students who are not in a program into lower and upper division. If your institution does not use a credit hour criterion, then an upper division student is an undergraduate student who has completed more than 56 semester hours (or more that 84 quarter hours). b. Two-year institutions-- all NOT IN A PROGRAM STUDENTS at predominantly two-year institutions are lower division. [See SDF element 16 STUDENT LEVEL.]

Back to Top

 




- V -

VETERAN BENEFIT/ACTIVE MILITARY STATUS [SDF element 6, ADF element 4]

VISA TYPE: See SDF element 9 PERMANENT RESIDENCE.

Back to Top

 




- W -

WEEKLY FACULTY CONTACT HOURS (WFCOH): The weekly faculty contact hours for a staff member are the number of hours in a week the staff member meets with classes in a formal instructional environment or in credit-bearing tutorial sessions. [CASA]

WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS (WSCOH) The weekly student contact hours for a course are the number of hours in a week all students enrolled in the course spend in a formal instructional environment or in credit-bearing tutorial sessions. [CASA]

Back to Top

 



- X - (empty) Back to Top

 



- Y - (empty) Back to Top

 



- Z - (empty) Back to Top

 



- # - (empty) Back to Top