Faculty and Staff Directory

John Schwoebel

schwoebel EMail:  john.schwoebel@oswego.edu
Office: Mahar 407
Phone: 312-3466
Website:  http://sites.google.com/site/johnschwoebel/

 

Fall 2012 Class Schedule:
Course Number:  PSY 280-880
Course Title:  Analysis of Psychological Data
Lecture Day(s):  Monday, Wednesday, Friday
Time:  11:30-12:25
Location:  Mahar 118
Lab Day:  Tuesday
Time:  9:35-11:35
Location:  Mahar 302

Course Number:  PSY 305-810
Course Title:  Cognition
Day(s):  Monday, Wednesday, Friday
Time:  12:40-1:35
Location:  Mahar 118

Course Number:  PSY 363-800
Course Title:  Cognitive Neuroscience
Day(s):  Monday & Wednesday
Time:  3:00-4:20
Location:  Mahar 118

Course Number:  PSY 405-810/80L
Course Title:  Cognition with Lab
Lecture Day(s):  Tuesday
Time:  5:30-8:15
Location:  Mahar 203
Lab Day(s):  Monday
Time:  5:30-7:30
Location:  Mahar 302

Fall 2012 Office Hours:
Day(s): 
Time: 

Spring 2013 Class Schedule:
Course Number:  PSY 100-880
Course Title:  Principles of Human Behavior
Day(s):  MWF
Time:  11:30-12:25
Location:  Lanigan 103

Course Number:  PSY 280-840/84L
Course Title:  Analysis of Psychological Data
Lecture Day(s):  MWF
Time:  10:20-11:15
Location:  Mahar 106
Lab Day(s):  Th
Time:  11:10-1:10
Location:  Mahar 302

Course Number:  PSY 305-800 C/L PSY 405-800
Course Title:  Cognition
Day(s):  MWF
Time:  9:10-10:05
Location:  Lanigan 106

Course Number:  PSY 405-800/80L
Course Title:  Cognition with Lab
Lecture Day(s):  MWF
Time:  9:10-10:05
Location:  Lanigan 106
Lab Day(s):  F
Time:  12:40-2:40
Location:  Mahar 102

Spring 2013 Office Hours:
Day:   Monday & Wednesday         Time: 12:30-1:30

Research Interests:
My research interests can be broken down into four main areas. First, I'm interested in exploring questions about mental representations of the human body. For example, how do you represent the shape and current position of your body and how might this information be used to guide motor imagery and action and to give you a sense of control over your movements? Second, I'm interested in investigating questions about visual object recognition. For example, how do you recognize your car when you see it from the front and from the side despite the drastic changes in its perceived shape when seen from these different viewpoints? Third, I'm interested in questions about the organization and plasticity of conceptual representations. For example, do different types of representations underlie your knowledge of humans, hammers, and hummingbirds? Fourth, I'm interested in investigating just about any psychological question that a student is really excited to explore with me. If you are a student with such a question, please let me know.

Professional Information:
Education:
Post-Doctoral Fellow: (1998-2002) Cognitive Neuropsychology, University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, & Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute
Ph.D.:  (1997) Cognitive Psychology, Boston College
B.A.:  (1992) Psychology, Castleton State College    

Recent Papers and Publications:
(* indicates undergraduate research collaborator)

Coslett, H. B., Buxbaum, L. J., & Schwoebel, J. (2008). Accurate reaching after active but not passive movements of the hand: Evidence for forward modeling. Behavioural Neurology, 19, 117-125.

Schwoebel, J., *Sorensen, T., & *Kuhn, A. (2007, March). Testing trounces studying in the battle for long-term retention: A cognitive version of no pain no gain. Poster presentation at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Philadelphia.

Schwoebel, J. & *Swart, S. L. (2006, March). Does motor imagery reflect constraints on movement imposed by tool-use? Poster presentation at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Baltimore.

Schwoebel, J., & Coslett, H. B. (2005). Evidence for multiple, distinct representations of the human body. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17, 543-553.

Schwoebel, J., Buxbaum, L. J., & Coslett, H. B. (2004). Representations of the human body in the production and imitation of complex movements. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 21, 285-298.

*Shenton, J. T., Schwoebel, J., & Coslett, H. B. (2004). Mental motor imagery and the body schema: Evidence for proprioceptive dominance. Neuroscience Letters, 370, 19-24.

Schwoebel, J., Coslett, H. B., Bradt, J., Friedman, R., & Dileo, C. (2002). Pain and the body schema: Effects of pain severity on mental representations of movement. Neurology, 59, 775-777.

Coslett, H. B., Saffran, E. M., & Schwoebel, J. (2002). Knowledge of the human body: A distinct semantic domain. Neurology, 59, 357-363.

Schwoebel, J., Boronat, C. B., & Coslett, H. B. (2002). The man who executed "imagined" movements: Evidence for dissociable components of the body schema. Brain and Cognition, 50, 1-16.

Schwoebel, J., Friedman, R., *Duda, N., & Coslett, H. B. (2001). Pain and the body schema: Evidence for peripheral effects on mental representations of movement. Brain, 124, 2098-2104.

Schwoebel, J., Coslett, H. B., & Buxbaum, L. J. (2001). Compensatory coding of body part location in autotopagnosia: Evidence for extrinsic egocentric coding. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 18, 363-381.

Schwoebel, J. & Srinivas, K. (2000). Recognizing objects seen from novel viewpoints: Effects of view similarity and time. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 26, 915-928.

Schwoebel, J., Dews, S., Winner, E., & Srinivas, K. (2000). Obligatory processing of the Literal meaning of ironic utterances: Further evidence. Metaphor and Symbol, 15, 47-61.