Spring 2015 Course Descriptions

CINEMA & SCREEN STUDIES


CSS 235 - INTRODUCTION TO CINEMA PRODUCTION                                            Adams, Josh
TR 2:20-3:40
This course presents the basic concepts, techniques, and processes of cinema production. Throughout the course the student will learn how to write, storyboard, shoot, and edit an electronic motion picture. Digital post production processes will be introduced. Narrative, documentary, and experimental theories will be discussed, and the students will participate in directing and producing a final short film for a public screening.

CSS 335 - INTERMEDIATE CINEMA PRODUCTION                                                    Dodd
TR 2:20-3:40
CSS 335 is an intermediate production course focused on digital video/ film production. It is designed to lead you towards effectively telling an engaging narrative story in a small amount of time through visual, aural and emotional methods. You will learn how to successfully take a short screenplay and transform it into a moving picture using the Classical Narrative Paradigm. You will learn how to attract an audience, and affect them emotionally, using conflict, action, tension and release. The class will utilize the three-tier studio model of preproduction, production and post-production, along with a "green-light" process for their final project. You will learn the importance of story-boarding, writing, casting, scheduling and budgeting, pertaining to industry standards.

CSS 391 -     FILM PRACTICUM                                                                                               Adams, Josh
M 6:10-9:00       
Film Practicum is an intensive, cerebral and physical exercise in the various approaches to filmmaking and videography. This course takes both conventional and experimental paths to help students expand their creative horizons. Students should expect to be "in production" constantly during the semester.

CSS 395 - SPECIALIZED STUDIES: ECO CINEMA                                                        Deater
T 3:00-6:00
*This course will be a combination of Theory & Production and include field trips to local area parks. 
Environmental films will be seen as texts to be understood from cultural, historical, and political perspectives.  This course will use a rhetorical approach for understanding environmental films by analyzing audience, context, and purpose.  It will challenge students to apply critical thinking skills as they construct arguments related to themes and topics presented in environmental films.  Students will use their understanding of the artistic process that influences representations of environment in film to produce their own cinematic encounters with the environment.  They will explore how the film medium constructs meaning around environmental issues.

CSS 395- SPECIAL TOPICS: CINEMATOGRAPHY                                                           Dodd
TR 11:10-12:30
Students will research and engage in the art of cinematography through hands on workshops and collaborative seminars designed to enhance their creative use of light, shadow, movement, color, shot duration, and composition. The role of the director of photography will be explored in-depth beginning from collaboration with the director through camera selection to final execution and color correction. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for fictional narrative and documentary productions. The student will develop artistic strategies and crew managerial skills that shape motion picture aesthetics and utilize the full fidelity of motion picture imaging formats. All available cinema camera systems will be stressed including: Super 8mm, Ultra 16mm Arriflex SR, and DSLR HD Video. The creative options of the 16mm and DSLR prime lens packages will be fully highlighted in the course. Students will execute film emulsion tests, lens tests, lighting demonstrations, and complete dramatic scenes focused on building an argument for their chosen stylistic approach. The semester will conclude with each student completing a short film in which they are the sole director of photography on a peer production.

CSS 485 - EXPERIMENTAL FILMMAKING                                                                         Shore
M 3:00-6:00
The purpose for this course is to examine experimental cinema and the avant garde as an alternative method of filmmaking. The student will experiment with non-narrative, impressionistic, and poetic filmmaking methods in order to engage the audience in thought-provoking manners.
Prerequisite: ENG 286

CREATIVE WRITING


CRW 201 - SCREENWRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                         Giglio
MWF - 10:20-11:15
This introductory course explores the screenwriting genre as it applies to a visual medium. Students will engage in writing exercises to learn the elements of story, character development, structure, scene study and dialogue. Students will also analyze professional screenplays, learn to pitch and write their own short film script. No prerequisite.

CRW 201 - SCREENWRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                          Folk
MWF 1:50-2:45
This introductory course explores the screenwriting genre as it applies to a visual medium.  Students will engage in writing exercises to learn the elements of story, character development, structure, scene study and dialogue.  Students will also analyze professional screenplays, learn to pitch and write their own short film script. No prerequisite.

CRW 205 - POETRY WRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                        Donnelly
TR 9:35-10:55, 11:10-12:30
Poet Naomi Shihab Nye writes, "Poetry is a conversation with the world; poetry is a conversation with the words on the page in which you allow those words to speak back to you; and poetry is a conversation with yourself." In CRW 205, students engage with this conversation while exploring the building blocks of poetry - image, metaphor, diction, voice, line, form, sound, and revision. Class includes some craft lecture, but focuses primarily on discussion of contemporary poets and student work. No previous experience with poetry is necessary.

CRW 205 - POETRY WRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                       Itzin
MWF 8:00-8:55      
CRW 205 is an introductory course in the fine art of reading and writing poetry, with an emphasis on the latter. Since reading and writing poetry are reciprocal activities, students will read a variety of poetry voices and styles with a critical eye on "how" and "how well" they are written and how this can be used in their own writing. The course will discuss ideas for generating poems, the vocabulary to discuss them in a workshop setting, and revision techniques.
                                       

CRW 205 - POETRY WRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                        Pritchard
MWF 10:20-11:15       
Poet Naomi Shihab Nye writes, "Poetry is a conversation with the world; poetry is a conversation with the words on the page in which you allow those words to speak back to you; and poetry is a conversation with yourself." In CRW 205, students engage with this conversation while exploring the building blocks of poetry - image, metaphor, diction, voice, line, form, sound, and revision. Class includes some craft lecture, but focuses primarily on discussion of contemporary poets and student work. No previous experience with poetry is necessary.

CRW 206- FICTION WRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                        Wilson
MWF 9:10-10:05     
Toni Morrison wrote: "If there's a book you really want to read, but it hasn't been written yet, then you must write it."  You can get started in this beginning fiction writing workshop.  You'll be reading contemporary short stories and writing exercises using a variety of fiction techniques.  In the latter half of the semester everyone will produce a full-length story, which will be discussed by the entire class.  You'll be giving written critiques of everyone's stories and this will help you form a critical aesthetic in the genre. 

CRW 206- FICTION WRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                         Motto
TR 9:35-10:55, 11:10-12:30
In this fiction writing course, students will read and critique each other's work, as well as the work of established authors. Students should expect daily exercises, quizzes, class discussion, one story and one re-write. This introductory course is designed for students who are non-writing majors. This course is linked to Angel.

CRW 207 - PLAYWRITING: INTRODUCTORY                                                                 Knight
MWF 9:10-10:05  - or -  10:20-11:15
We will read, write, watch, create, act, and produce in this interactive playwriting class! Together, we will examine short plays for their plot structure, dramatic action, conflict, character, dialogue, spectacle, and theme. Writing exercises are designed to spark the writing, to find a structure for stories, to deepen the dramatic principles listed above, and heighten theatricality. In class we will workshop each other's scripts, reading scenes in small groups and as a class and bringing the scenes to life. By the end of the class, all students will have completed a 15 min Play and be an integral part of all levels of production of The One-Min Play Festival.

CRW 208 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING: INTRODUCTION                            Halferty
TR 11:10-12:30      
This course introduces students to various modes of nonfiction writing, helps them analyze and evaluate literature in the genre, and provides an environment in which they develop writing in nonfiction modes.

CRW 208 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING: INTRODUCTION                            Steiner
MWF 12:40-1:35  - or -  1:50-2:45
This is a beginning workshop in creative nonfiction - the art of telling true stories. No experience is necessary; you need only love stories and believe that "real life" - yours and others' - is a rich source for writing material. We will read and discuss samples of the form by established writers, practice craft through short exercises, produce essays for workshop, and offer feedback on each other's work. Our goals are to hone writing skills, develop a critical vocabulary, learn workshop procedures and etiquette, and become familiar with forms of nonfiction.

CRW 208 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING: INTRODUCTION                           Allocco
MW 4:30-5:50
CRW 208 is an introductory workshop in nonfiction. Students will read and discuss the work of established writers and will become familiar with creative writing skills such as crafting scenes, using dialogue effectively, and building strong characters and themes. They will complete short exercises and write a full-length essay. Students will improve their writing skills, share constructive criticism in a workshop setting, begin to build a critical vocabulary and become familiar with the genre of nonfiction.

CRW 300 - LIVING WRITERS SERIES                                                                                  Giglio
MW 3:00-4:20       
This large-lecture course explores the creative process via a series of talks presented by writers across the genres and may include other members of the writing community (editors, librarians, publishers). Students develop their own values and aesthetics, and articulate them through exercises and assignments; participants become acquainted with the challenges, practices, and rewards of "the writing life." Open to all Oswego State students.

CRW 301 - SCREENWRITING: INTERMEDIATE                                                            Adams, Jamie
MWF 12:40-1:35 - or - 1:50-2:45
Intermediate screenwriting will allow students to analyze films, screenplays and lectures to continue the structural outcome of the feature-length screenplay, which they started in CRW 201, or an entirely new script of their choosing. Workshops in class with groups as well as those led by the instructor will help students navigate through the structure, format and style of a feature-length film script. Exercises, reading scripts as well as written and oral critical responses/ critiques of classmates' work will be required. Prerequisite: CRW 201 Screenwriting: Introductory

CRW 305 - POETRY WRITING: INTERMEDIATE                                                            Itzin
MWF 10:20-11:15       
The core of CRW 305 is the writing workshop, featuring poems by each student. In addition to extensive writing, revising, and critiquing, students read and discuss several single-author collections of poetry and selected craft essays that encourage experimentation with a variety of poetic styles. We'll also continue to consider what it means to be a literary citizen, both within and beyond the classroom. A final portfolio of revised poetry will be required.

CRW 305 - POETRY WRITING: INTERMEDIATE                                                           Pritchard
MWF 11:30-12:25
In this intermediate level poetry workshop, students will write, revise, and critique a number of poems throughout the semester. Reading assignments will focus on several single-author poetry collections, and some analytical writing is also required. We will also experiment with digital form. A final portfolio, including new and revised poetry, will be submitted at the end of the semester. CRW 205 is a prerequisite for this course.

CRW 306 - FICTION WRITING: INTERMEDIATE                                                           O'Connor
TR 11:10-12:30 - or - 12:45-2:05
This course is an intensive workshop in fiction writing in which you will examine student stories as well as stories from The Best American Short Stories.  Students will develop and discuss their aesthetic principles.  Requirements: 3 stories or sections of a novel, story responses, self-assessment paper, and use of Angel.  Prerequisite:  CRW 206.

CRW 307 - PLAYWRITING: INTERMEDIATE                                                                     Knight
MWF 1:50-2:45
Students will employ techniques from the beginning course while learning to take conscious risks in their writing. We will look at breaking open the form and actively investigate elements of playwriting with an eye toward distilling and manifesting each writer's intention. We will cover a range of new and classic plays to build the students' story-telling toolkits and strengthen performance analysis and critical response. In class we will workshop each other's scripts, reading scenes in small groups and as a class and bringing the scenes to life. By the end of the class, all students will have completed a One-Act Play (at least 30 pages of material).

CRW 308 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING: INTERMEDIATE                            Loomis
TR 11:10-12:30
CRW 308 is an intermediate nonfiction workshop.  Students will read and discuss creative nonfiction by established writers, write their own essays, and critique the work of their peers.  Students will conduct various forms of research to establish mastery over chosen subject matter.  They will investigate technical and aesthetic aspects of the genre, and ponder ethical questions, such as "what is truth?" and "do I have a right to use other people's stories as my own?"  One full-length essay as well as several short pieces will be required.  CRW 208 is a prerequisite.

CRW 308 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING: INTERMEDIATE                          Allocco
W 6:00-8:45      
CRW 308 is an intermediate nonfiction workshop.  Students will read and discuss creative nonfiction by established writers, write their own essays, and critique the work of their peers.  Students will conduct various forms of research to establish mastery over chosen subject matter.  They will investigate technical and aesthetic aspects of the genre, and ponder ethical questions, such as "what is truth?" and "do I have a right to use other people's stories as my own?"  One full-length essay as well as several short pieces will be required.  CRW 208 is a prerequisite.

CRW 313- DIGITAL STORYTELLING                                                                                 Knight
ONLINE
A basic introduction to creating narrative in and for digital platforms.
Prerequisite: Three credits in English or Creative Writing, or instructor permission.

CRW 355 - Literary Citizenship                                                                                          Steiner
W 4:00-6:45
This course is designed for motivated students to pursue ways of enhancing their understanding of the writing life.  It is not a course on how to get a job, and is neither a literature course nor a creative writing workshop, although you will read and write extensively and will likely increase your "marketability" as a creative writer. Students will work on several projects simultaneously for most of the semester, including group and individual presentations, community activities, and ongoing writing assignments. Emphasis will be placed on initiative, investigation, collaboration and professionalism.  If you care about making the world a better place for readers and writers, Literary Citizenship is for you.   PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED

CRW 401 - SCREENWRITING ADVANCED                                                                   Giglio
MWF 12:40-1:35
Writers need deadlines.  I personally know this to be true.  This course will require that you write a complete feature screenplay.  This process will be facilitated by lectures, in class assignments, and small and large group workshops.  You will pitch ideas, break your story into a beat sheet, get immersed in character development and finally write a feature screenplay.  In addition, we'll have discussions about working in the Hollywood "industry" and you will learn to write script coverage.  Prerequisite: CRW 301

CRW 406- FICTION WRITING: ADVANCED                                                                 O'Connor
TR 2:20-3:40
It takes skill to compress the universe of a story or tale into less than a thousand words.  Flash fiction must deliver an impact and ramify in subtext while paying attention to economies of scale.  In this class we'll be writing almost a dozen different flash fictions, and we'll be reading widely in contemporary flash fiction.  The course will require you to write a flash every week.  You will be expected to make group presentations and organize a final portfolio of your best work.  CRW 306 is a preprequisite.

LITERARY STUDIES


ENG 101 - COMPOSITION I                                                                                                 All Sections
Review of fundamentals of writing for students with problems in writing skills so that they may continue successfully in ENG 102.

ENG 102 - COMPOSITION II                                                                                              All Sections
Practice in college level writing, includes preparation of a research paper.

ENG 103 - ADVANCED LISTENING COMPREHENSION                                            Skolnik
TR 11:10-12:30       
This course is designed for students with limited English proficiency to better understand extended academic discourse, including authentic lectures, and to refine note- taking skills in order for them to perform their academic tasks competently and successfully. 

ENG 104 - ADVANCED READING                                                                                       Skolnik
TR 9:35-10:55     
This course is designed to improve and develop the reading ability of students with limited English proficiency as it relates to critically analyzing academic texts.

ENG 105 - ADVANCED SPOKEN ENGLISH                                                                    Davis
TR 4:30-5:50
This course is designed to improve and develop the speaking ability of students with limited English proficiency as it relates to interpersonal and small group communication.

ENG 204 HONORS- WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE                                             All Sections
Exploration of our own language use through the lens of literature, and exploration of literary language from the perspective we create with our own uses of language.  We will study narrative, verse, and drama and one or two additional novels and plays.  Approximately six essays.

ENG 204 - WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE                                                              Bishop
MWF 10:20-11:15
Student-critics will practice scholarly literary criticism by applying insights learned from several key critical texts to our analysis of language from three different literary texts: first we'll critique a longer poem (from the 1700s or 1800s), then a play (from the 1800s or 1900s), and finally a novel (from current times). Student literary critics will create individualized critical strategies that draw upon their own political concerns, while incorporating material from the three major branches of critical theory commonly practiced in the field of literary studies:
·         Theories of form, which look at the text as an object that's been put together in a certain way. From a formal approach, we consider aspects such as genre, narrative structure and language.
·         Theories of mind, which look at the way human thought and feeling are represented in the text, as well as how we with our own minds react to and relate to the texts we read. In this mode, we can consider psychoanalysis (sexual and emotional desire, the behavior of the unconscious), epistemology and cognition (the study of the processes whereby knowledge is attained, theories of how and why we know things).
·         Theories of culture, which attend to the material conditions and social structures that influenced the creation of a literary work, and which are also represented by that literary work. Cultural theories examine how politics and power, gender, economics, religion, the natural environment, race and ethnicity, history, art and cultural forms affect human lives and relationships.
Course work consists of one short early paper, homework assignments that apply key concepts from a particular critical text to a close reading of language from the literary text, and a final research paper.

ENG 204 - WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE                                                                Coll
TR 2:20-3:40
Student-critics will practice scholarly literary criticism by applying insights learned from several key critical texts to our analysis of language from three different literary texts: first we'll critique a longer poem (from the 1700s or 1800s), then a play (from the 1800s or 1900s), and finally a novel (from current times). Student literary critics will create individualized critical strategies that draw upon their own political concerns, while incorporating material from the three major branches of critical theory commonly practiced in the field of literary studies:
·         Theories of form, which look at the text as an object that's been put together in a certain way. From a formal approach, we consider aspects such as genre, narrative structure and language.
·         Theories of mind, which look at the way human thought and feeling are represented in the text, as well as how we with our own minds react to and relate to the texts we read. In this mode, we can consider psychoanalysis (sexual and emotional desire, the behavior of the unconscious), epistemology and cognition (the study of the processes whereby knowledge is attained, theories of how and why we know things).
·         Theories of culture, which attend to the material conditions and social structures that influenced the creation of a literary work, and which are also represented by that literary work. Cultural theories examine how politics and power, gender, economics, religion, the natural environment, race and ethnicity, history, art and cultural forms affect human lives and relationships.
Course work consists of one short early paper, homework assignments that apply key concepts from a particular critical text to a close reading of language from the literary text, and a final research paper.

ENG 210 - WESTERN HERITAGE I: LITERATURE                                               Bertonneau
MWF 9:10-10:05
A survey of the antique basis of Western Civilization focusing on the Greek and Latin achievements through a survey of selected texts. The instructor has organized the course thematically around the topic of the Trojan War. Students read Homer, the tragedians, Virgil, and others on the moral, political, cultural, and theological implications of the Trojan War. The course addresses the question whether the Trojan War was an actual event and if so whether its causes and consequences are attestable, outside of literature, in the archeological evidence. Students will view several films and filmed performances related to the theme.

ENG 220 - MODERN CULTURE AND MEDIA                                                             Halferty
TR 9:35-10:55
Relying upon each student's familiarity with cultural forms (for example, in film, television, popular music and music videos, comic books, cartoons, advertisements, magazines, detective fiction, and romances), this course introduces students to the methods and interpretive strategies of literary studies.

ENG 220 - MODERN CULTURE AND MEDIA                                                            Coll
TR 11:10-12:30
"Humanism and Posthumanism." In this section of ENG 220, we will analyze a variety of cultural forms that share an interest in examining what it means to be human. Using Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897), Karel Čapek's R.U.R. (1920), Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go (2005), and Daryl Gregory's Raising Stony Mayhall (2011) as anchor texts, we will explore how humanist notions of embodiment, affect, and political subjectivity are questioned and complicated in stories about almost-humans. We will also read theoretical works that challenge humanist ideas from a group of perspectives that have come to be called posthumanist. Your work in this class will include discussion, staying current with your reading assignments, completing several short writing assignments and tests, and producing a research-based analytical paper.

ENG 220 - MODERN CULTURE AND MEDIA                                                          Folk
MWF 9:10-10:05
Using examples from popular culture, social media, film, television, novels and popular trends as the "text", this course examines what effect our culture has on modern media and vice versa. Students will take a deeper look at what it means to be human and interact with the world, as it exists today. Specific topics will be examined using zombie lore, fairytales in popular culture and much more!

ENG 235- AMERICAN LITERATURE/CIVIL WAR                                             Guerra
TR 12:45-2:05
"American Hauntings/Haunted Americans." This course considers the formation of U.S. literature and culture by following a variety of major themes in the literary history of America, from its beginnings through the Civil War. These themes include both religious and secular attempts to represent a unique American mission and identity, a focus on individual reform and personal transcendence, and the issues that accompanied longstanding debates over the social role of women and non-whites in the era before the Civil War. Our journey through early American literature will be guided in part by images of haunting and the supernatural, as we look at a number of texts that use these figures to comment on forces within society that fall off of the grid of the supposedly "natural" order of things-the remainders of historical violence, bodies marginalized by their gender or race, and stories too dangerous to be told in the light of day.

In addition to exploring these themes, this course will also strengthen students' skills in close reading, argumentative writing, and analytical discussion-while also providing a richer perspective on the history that informs the contemporary United States.

ENG 237 - ETHNICITY & CULTURE DIFFERENCES IN LITERATURE         Zeller
TR 11:10-12:30       
That America is a land of immigrants is hardly news. Until recently, we didn't study the literary response of those immigrants to their experiences in becoming Americans or even what it meant to be an American. In this class we examine how culture and difference expresses itself in literature since 1945. Specifically we look at the poetry and stories of Asian and Hispanic immigrants, Native Americans, African Americans, women and gay writers. We will read one comic and the experimental novel The Buddha in the Attic by Juile Otsuka.

ENG 265 - SOPHOMORE SEMINAR IN GENRE                                                     Bishop
TR 8:00-9:20
This class exists to give English majors a strong introduction to a specific genre of literature. This class will focus on the poetry of British Romanticism. British romantic writers operated from 1780-1830 and concerned themselves with themes of imagination, women's rights, abolition, nature and other subjects. We will encounter these themes by working through the different verse forms these poets chose to pour their work into. These include: narrative, lyric, ballad, ode, and elegy among others. By analyzing these genres we will see how different writers preserve and deviate from the conventions of the genres in order to attend to the needs of each text. While all the poets under discussion are "Romantic" they also draw on the dynamic and diverse influences of their time: revolution, philosophy, science and more. All of these interests create a network of signifiers around the text, which work as a cipher for us to discover.

ENG 265 - SOPHOMORE SEMINAR IN GENRE                                                    Cooper                 
TR 11:10-12:30
Prose Genres and the Origins of the English Novel. We'll read two works of fiction from the early 1700s with a goal of understanding how the early English novel commented on, and sometimes parodied, earlier genres of prose writing, including the romance, the saint's life and the spiritual autobiography. Mostly, the early novels satirized romance, gender roles and the institution of marriage. Critical readings will discuss the predominant themes of social rank, wealth, violence, virtue, truth and the sexual double standard that permitted a man to have sex outside of marriage, while casting the woman out of society if she was caught doing the same thing. The focus will be on understanding how the form of the novel evolved as the aesthetical fulfillment of the ethical and intellectual needs of society. Coursework: close reading of passages from the novels, one short early paper, a presentation, homework assignments about the critical readings and a final research paper.

ENG 265 - SOPHOMORE SEMINAR IN GENRE                                                          Staff
MWF 12:40-1:35
An intensive introduction to the study of some of the conventions of literary genre, including genre theory. The course will undertake a comparative analysis of two specific genres, or kinds, of literary production's for example, lyric and ballad, pastoral and allegory, encomium (formalized poems of praise) and satire. The study will place examples within their historical contexts and within the history of the conventional genre.  PREREQ: ENG 204 or instructor permission.

ENG 271 - PRACTICAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR                                                            Murphy, M.
MWF 10:20-11:15
Designed for students intending to teach, this course focuses on teaching grammar in the context of writing.  A broad review of parts of speech, the syntax of complex sentences, and the conventions of standard usage will be supplemented by attention to the relation between standard and non-standard dialects, as well as to dealing with dialect difference in the classroom and in written work.  Graded work includes exams, tutoring, teaching a mini-lesson, and the maintenance of a journal of observed usages.

ENG 286 - INTRODUCTION TO CINEMA STUDIES                                                 Shore
TR 9:35-10:55
T 6:00-8:15 Lab      
The purpose of this course is to provide a critical introduction to the study of cinema and screen studies. The course is comprised of two sections: 1) film and formal analysis; 2) film and historical analysis. This course satisfies the Knowledge Foundations in the Humanities requirement of General Education, the Contexts category in the English Major and is the introductory course for the major in Cinema and Screen Studies. 

ENG 304 - LITERARY CRITICISM                                                                                 Schaber
TR 2:20-3:45
This semester we will engage with a series of texts, some quite old, others quite recent, which will help us become increasingly attentive to the elements and practices constitutive of literature as such and to sketch some of the possible horizons for the understanding of works of literary art.  In short, these texts-by philosophers, linguists, psychoanalysts, anthropologists, poets, scientists-will help us situate ourselves in relation to literature and criticism, both of which imply creative acts.  Bi-weekly papers and a final project.  Required text:  Leitch et al., eds.  The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism.

ENG 304 - LITERARY CRITICISM                                                                                 Murphy, P.

TR 12:45-2:05
How do literary critics do what they do? What is the secret behind writing a critical interpretation of a literary work of art that others will find insightful and compelling? What is at stake when literary critics begin to argue over how works of literary art should be read or taught?  This course will answer some of these questions, while it attempts to answer the toughest questions of them all: What can one do with an English major?  We will pursue these and similar questions by focusing upon some interpretive strategies in formalism, structuralism, hermeneutics, psychoanalysis, deconstruction and cultural materialism.  We will examine some developments within feminism, gay and lesbian studies, and perhaps some cultural anthropology and ethnography, while situating these developments within the larger traditions of literary criticism and theory that begin with Plato and Aristotle.  By reading both theory and criticism along with several specific literary texts, we will examine how literary criticism is fashioned, what is at stake in its arguments, and how literary criticism provides its own unique kinds of political, philosophical, historical, and poetic knowledge.

ENG 304 - LITERARY CRITICISM                                                                                  Curtin
TR 3:55-5:15
We will examine literary "theory" that spans from the Enlightenment to the contemporary period, and we will consider debates about the role of the poet or writer in history. Our initial discussions will focus on John Dos Passos' novel, The 42nd Parallel (1930), and the first essay will provide an opportunity to develop literary analysis guided by whatever questions most resonate with you. Though we will move on to examine literary theory primarily, we will reflect on various theoretical approaches by re-visiting The 42nd Parallel throughout the semester.
Teams of students will work together to facilitate class discussion of theoretical texts: identifying, contextualizing, and paraphrasing the central thesis of each project; exploring the premises and implications of each new essay; juxtaposing new inquiries with more familiar with ones; and demonstrating how the theoretical text illuminates The 42nd Parallel. This kind of engagement will constitute the basis of the second essay. In the final essay project, students will choose a literary text from an extensive list, develop their own theoretically informed analysis and argument, and integrate relevant critical scholarship. This project will be undertaken in stages, including a proposal, an exam, a draft, a conference, and a revision.

ENG 319 - SHAKESPEARE-AN INTRODUCTION                                                       Murphy, P.
TR 3:55-5:15
This course studies Shakespeare's development as a writer who explores new possibilities for his poetry and his plays while altering, amplifying, or discarding old strategies.  We examine the full range of Shakespeare's writing:  (1) from his somewhat early work in the sonnets and narrative poems along with his early experimentations in comedy to his more mature developments in the history play and festive comedy, (2) from his first attempts at tragedy to the breakdown of comic form in the problem plays, and (3) from his exclusive attention upon tragedy to his almost exclusive work in the later romances.  Our readings will be selected from each of these phases and genres.  There will be two or three examinations and two essays.

ENG 322 - 19th CENTURY ENGLISH NOVEL                                                              Coll
TR 12:45-2:05
The nineteenth century has often been described as the "golden age" of fiction, a time in which the novel form took on a shape and function that we now consider conventional. In this class, we will explore how the emergence of the novel in Britain in the nineteenth century both reflected and constructed ways of thinking about a world that was in the midst of enormous cultural, political, and material change. Through our reading of six representative nineteenth-century novels, we will analyze narrative techniques, approaches to characterization and emplotment, the concept of the novel as a site for ethical engagement, and the changing aims of authors and readers across the century. Your work in this class will include active discussion and participation, staying current with your reading assignments, completing several short writing assignments and tests, and producing a research-based analytical paper.

ENG 323 - 20TH CENTURY BRITISH FICTION                                                          Jayawardane
TR 9:35-10:55
When you imagine a picture of what's British, don't you immediately think Downtown Abby, the Queen, jam, tea, and scones? Similarly, when we think of British literature, we immediately think of Shakespeare and Jane Austen. However, in the twentieth century, what constitutes Britain and British literature has changed as much as America and American literature...it is only our fantasy of Britain that hasn't changed. In this class, we will examine the ways in which Diasporic people, such as Caribbean and Indian immigrants who arrived in Britain after WWI and WWII questioned, challenged, and remade what we think of as British identity. The authors we will read are the embodiment of the "global transnational": they are at home in Britain - and at times, deeply embedded in "English" culture - but they are also able to see through the false constructions behind Englishness, precisely because of their outsider/Other status in the island. Through their writing, we will look at how literature and storytelling has become an intrinsic part of refashioning what is "British". In order to better understand the literature, we will also tackle a number of themes and issues including: patterns of migration, representations of identity and difference, "ethnic" cultural production, diasporic youth cultures, gendered dimensions of race-relations, relationship between class and race, and state policies in twentieth century Britain.

ENG 337 - LITERATURE OF THE HARLAM RENAISSANCE                                      Clark
MW 4:35-5:55
In this course, we will read selected writers of the Harlem Renaissance and explore, among other issues, the concerns of the "talented tenth," the particular construction (by some of the writers) of a hierarchy within the black community that separated the intelligentsia and the "common folk".  Additionally, we will consider the political and social effects of an aesthetic movement like the Renaissance as these intersect with questions of gender, color privilege, and social status.  We will also question the invocation of Harlem as a geographic site for the movement.  The writers we might read include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, Alain Locke, Nella Larsen, Jessie Fauset, Bruce Nugent, and George Schuyler.  Course requirements include essay assignments and mid-term and final examinations.

ENG 343 - 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL                                                             LaLonde
TR 2:20-3:40
Just for grins, we'll spend the semester reading, thinking about, and discussing texts that ask us to think about the novel genre.  We'll explore novels within novels, novels that refuse to stay within the bounds of fiction, novels that comment on themselves, novels that seem to defy comment.  There will be the usual subjects, texts from Faulkner and Nabokov spring to mind immediately, along with texts from African-American, Chicana, and Native American writers.  Who knows, perhaps a graphic novel will strike our fancy.  Students can look forward to tests and essays. 

ENG 350- MODERN DRAMA                                                                                                    Bertonneau
MWF 11:30-12:25      
This course surveys modern drama from Ibsen and Strindberg to contemporary dramatists such as Pinter, Stoppard, and Fugard, considering how each playwright uses the dramatic form and what their plays reveal about the worlds in which they move. As these texts were meant to be viewed in performance, whenever possible we'll make use of filmed productions as well as reading the printed text. Our primary objective will be to read, think about and discuss, and write about this selection of modern plays, written beyond America's borders.
COURSE TEXTS: (1) Ghosts, Ibsen; (2) Miss Julie, Strindberg; (3) Major Barbara, Shaw; (4) The Importance of Being Earnest, Wilde; (5) Galileo, Brecht; (6) Rhinoceros, Ionesco; (7) Waiting for Godot, Beckett; (8) Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Stoppard; (9) Betrayal, Pinter; (10) Master Harold . . . and the Boys, Fugard; (11) The History Boys, Bennett.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  (1) in-class reaction/response writing; (2) short essay analyzing a scene, minor character, or staging choice; (3) longer interpretive essay; (4) group panel presentation; (5) take-home midterm and final exams; (6) class participation.

ENG 351- AMERICAN POETRY SINCE 1945                                                                         Donnelly
TR 2:20-3:40
American Poetry Since 1945 will study the poets and movements that have shaped contemporary poetry.

ENG 360 - LITERATURE IN GLOBAL CONTEXT                                                              Staff
MWF 11:30-12:25
Futurism. Feminism. Colonialism. In the past 100 years the world has changed radically. In this course we will look at a few writers influenced, recorded, and responded to the 'isms' of the modern world and their effects of course of the past century. Of necessity, we can only touch the surface of that writing. We read around the world, mostly exempting European writers who might be covered in other courses

ENG 361 - TRAVEL, MIGRATION, DIASPORA                                                                   Jayawardane

TR 11:10-12:25
Did you know that East Africans from Ethiopia and the Swahili Coast were generals and aides to kings in India, long before the arrival of Europeans?  And that Bengali Indians arrived in Harlem in the late 1800s, integrating with the Hispanic population? This class explores how literature-and storytelling-is an intrinsic part of migration. This course focuses on how literature-and storytelling-is an intrinsic part of Diaspora: the transnational flows of people, goods, intellectual ideas, and spiritual beliefs across oceanic pathways and cross-continental roads. We will focus on novels and memoirs by authors who are the embodiment of the "global transnational" - sometimes deeply embedded in a "home" culture, but often loyal to neither nation nor ethnicity. Through reading literature connected to immigration, including (possibly) Jhumpa Lahiri's Unaccustomed Earth, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche's Americanah, and Diaspora theory, we will explore changing dynamics of identity and national affiliation in an era of increasing global connectivity. Drawing from various scholarly traditions, we will examine how literature captures the production, circulation, and consumption of ideas, serving as key sites for negotiating race relations and shaping constructions of socio-cultural and political identities. Exploring flows of literature and new media within and between North America, Europe, South Asia, Africa and other contexts, we will tackle a number of themes and issues including: patterns of migration, representations of identity and difference, "ethnic" cultural production, Diasporic youth cultures, gendered dimensions of race-relations, relationship between class and race, and state policies.
                                                                                                            
ENG 365 - JUNIOR SEMINAR                                                                                               Cooper

TR 2:20-3:40      
Melville: Publication and Annihilation. In this course we will analyze the modern idea of"author" in the United States as a social technology defined by a number of factors: the invention and improvement of mass-printing technologies such as lithography and the steam press, cultural fields defined by the aesthetic tastes of editors and audiences, the legal apparatus of copyright, and, of course, historical trends in literature and "literary" writing. Authorship in modern society entails much more than the romantic vision of a solitary mind toiling by the candlelight, more than simply putting pen to paper. And perhaps no author more fully reflects the triumphs and trials of this institution than the notoriously elusive, relentlessly complex, and ultimately rewarding Herman Melville. A darling of American audiences for his early sea-faring adventures Typee and Omoo, he was financially ruined by his most enduring book, Moby-Dick. Tracking a representative cross-section of Melville's work-along with touchstone critical essays, contemporary literature and reviews, and biographical back story-we will develop and complicate our ideas of "author," while thinking along with one of the most celebrated and eviscerated minds that ever aspired to that role.

ENG 365 - JUNIOR SEMINAR                                                                                                  Clark
TR 2:20-3:40
Since Alice Walker's recovery of Zora Neale Hurston's work in the mid-1970s, the interest in her work as novelist, anthropologist, memoirist, ethnographer, and womanist that spans from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s through the mid-twentieth century has not abated.  This course will examine Hurston's oeuvre, which may include the following: Their Eyes Were Watching God, Seraph on the Suwanee, Mules and Men, Mule Bone, Dust Tracks on a Road.  Additionally, we will explore her collaborations, conversations, and relationships with other writers such as Langston Hughes, Carl Van Vechten and Fanny Hurst in order to apprehend Hurston's oft-overlooked intellectualism in her creative work, her acceptance of patronage, and her conservatism, considered controversial by some.  The principle course requirement will be the completion of an extensive research project.

ENG 373 - THEORIES OF LANGUAGE                                                                               Staff
MWF 9:10-10:05
A survey and analysis of recent theories of language as the ground of literature, including reading, writing, speaking, and understanding. The course will examine the interplay between language and the issues of class, culture, gender, race, and childhood that affect our use of languages.  PREREQ: Minimum sophomore standing OR LIN 100 or instructor permission.

ENG 374 - HISTORY & DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE                   Staff
MWF 11:30-12:25       
Historical backgrounds of the English language, growth of vocabulary, and development of linguistics standards and usage.  PREREQ: Minimum sophomore standing or instructor permission.

ENG 376 - SCIENCE FICTION                                                                                               Bertonneau
MWF 1:50-2:45
An exploration of the mythic, philosophic, and poetic roots of the science fiction genre, this course surveys the field in the work of selected authors such as Leigh Brackett, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Philip K. Dick, Stanislaw Lem, H. P. Lovecraft, Catherine Louise Moore, William Olaf Stapledon, H. G. Wells, and others. Topics include science fiction as mythopoeia, as visionary experience, as anthropological speculation, and as metaphysics and theology. The course integrates key science fiction films, emphasizing the 1930s, 40s, and 50s.

ENG 384 - SS: YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE                                                                Kane
T 4:30-7:30     
This course will involve the study of current issues in the field of young adult literature, as well as major authors, themes, genres, award winning books, and pedagogical concerns. It will provide strategies for selecting and sharing appropriate literature with teens.

ENG 385 - CHILDREN'S LITERATURE                                                                             Troy-Smith
MWF 9:10-10:05
A survey course of literature for children.  Not a course in methodology, the basic purpose of this course will be to survey the various genres of literature that have been written especially for children (approximately 2-14 years of age), or literature that was originally written for adults, but now has generally been relegated to children.  The genres include:  picture books, nursery rhymes, folk literature, modern fantasy, realistic fiction, poetry, and information books.  Criteria will be established for literary evaluation.  Certain social issues such as sex, sexism, and violence will be discussed in terms of children's books.

ENG 386 - THE CINEMA                                                                                                           Schaber
TR 9:35-10:55
T 6:00-8:15 Lab       
A direct engagement with some fragments of the major theories of film from the 1930's to the present.  These primary documents will mediate an extended discussion of what cinema has been (or perhaps might have been), what it is (or perhaps might be), and what it is becoming (or perhaps might be becoming).   But we don't only have to think about the cinema; sometimes the cinema encourages us to think about other things, many other things, as well.  Three take-home exams.  Required texts:  Timothy Corrigan and Patricia White, Critical Visions in Film Theory (2011); Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener, Film Theory (2010).

ENG 387 - VISION & TEXTUALITY                                                                                     Guerra
TR 11:10-12:30
"I See What You're Saying." Who hasn't uttered some version of this phrase before? Mundane. And yet, if we really look at it, this everyday expression illustrates that the distinction between vision and text is always, well, blurry. From pictures that tell a story, to our generally held notions that a good book paints pictures with words, vision and text consistently and messily define each other in often frustrating and interminable loops. The inability to define one without the other-even as we commonly assume pictures and texts are distinct entities-often means that the idea of one lingers in the other, structuring it subtly. They haunt and perhaps even curse one another. In this course we will begin to unpack the relationship between these two terms by looking at fictions that highlight the link between vision, text, and curse-between the visionary as an agent of change and the historical documentarian as a reminder of what remains the same. Our case studies will range from the historical "wizardry" at the core of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, to the aesthetic evils of Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, to the dark generational dramas of watching and acting in Toni Morrison's Sula and Junot Díaz's The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.  

All the while, we'll develop our own critical eyes, enhancing our capacity to theorize productively about visual and verbal texts, and to allow these theories to change the way that we and others see.

ENG 388 - FILM GENRE                                                                                                                       Deater

W 3:00-6:00      
A history and analysis of film genre. The course will examine the notion of film genre as distinct from other notions of genre, in particular, literary genre. Special attention will be paid to horror, melodrama, film noir, musicals, science fiction, and teen pics.  Prerequisite: ENG 286 or minimum sophomore standing, or instructor permission.

ENG 426 - SHAKESPEAREAN CONTEXTS                                                                           Murphy, P.
W 6:00-8:45
This course will read several works by Shakespeare in two different contexts:  first, in the context of their postmodern retellings and appropriations by contemporary films and theatrical productions; and second, in the context of Shakespeare's predecessors and fellow writers: especially John Lyly, Thomas Kyd, and Christopher Marlowe.   In our weekly meetings we will explore the vast differences between past and present uses of Shakespeare's works, while we remain alert to how we make those differences disappear by imagining a common and shared history for our moment and the moment of Shakespeare's writing.  The course will probably begin by looking at how Derek Jarman's Edward II (a film based upon a play by Marlowe) draws upon and rejects strategies that are often thought to be Shakespearean.  Richard Burt claims that "it was often Shakespeare professors who launched [film] courses"; in pursuit of this discourse, this class will also examine the intimate relationship between film studies and Shakespeare criticism.  Course work will include:  two short papers, one longer paper and  a final examination. 

ENG 465 - SEMINAR IN ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES                                        Jayawardane
TR 2:20-3:40
On the day that two airliners blasted into the high floors of the Twin Towers of the World Trade Centre, I was getting ready for my first day of teaching for the fall quarter at the University of Denver, where I was doing my doctoral work. I was to pick up my then-partner, who was flying back to the US from Europe that day. My friend Tai, a woman delightfully addicted to conspiracy theories, rang me: I heard the phone ring through the blast of my hairdryer.        
            "Turn on your television. Something bad has happened."
I knew, then, that my passport, life experiences, and scholarship will be stamped by the political decisions subsequent to that fiery argument between two flying machines and two icons of power: while America united in mourning, many new immigrants to the nation knew that their "right to happiness" would be compromised. 9/11 was not just a day of terror in the Homeland; it was the day the 'West' became aware of Third-World Others' increased mobility - an unwelcome result of globalisation itself - leading national governments to use the risk of terror as currency in the political processes necessary for increasing 'security' via amplified surveillance, imprisonments without trial, and a sweeping series of legal policies hostile to the rights provided by the US constitution. In those early days, I was too afraid to show up at any rally - I knew surveillance would record my presence. Ten years after 9/11/2001, I know that we need to address the long-term effects of the War on Terror, and have a better understanding of our citizenship, constitutional rights, and engagement within the nation. We'll write about our own experiences, informed by legal scholarship, journalism, political manoeuvrings, and poetic language. Our class will read a variety of novels, memoirs, and theory and criticism that concerns 9/11 and the War of Terror, including Frederick Beigbeder's homage to the beauty of the buildings; Mahvish Rukhsana Khan's accounts of her time as a defence lawyer for the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay; and a news correspondent's experiences on the ground, with American soldiers.

ENG 465 - SEMINAR IN ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES                                      Curtin
TR 9:35-10:55
How the Irish Became "White" and Read All Over America:  The Greening of an Irish-American Literary Canon
In this advanced seminar, students will investigate what counts as "Irish American literature" and explore what political criteria inform the canon. We will consider salient historical and political contexts in the U.S. and Ireland, including especially nationalism, socialism, and feminism. In addition to reading those writers admitted to the canon on the basis of more or less immediate ties to Ireland, we will read twentieth century writers whose political positions-whether advocating for and mobilizing workers, Blacks, or women-have meant their exclusion from the canon. We will draw on the theoretical inquiry of Raymond Williams, among others, to consider how intellectuals' response to the socio-political upheaval of the first half of the twentieth century shaped the emergence of Irish American literature since the Cold War.
We will read fiction and non-fiction by some of the following: Jack Conroy, James T. Farrell, Ruth McKenney, Mary McCarthy, Flannery O'Connor, William Kennedy, Maureen Howard, Colm Toibin, Mary Gordon, Alice McDermott, and Colum McCann. We will also consider how the figure of the Irish-American circulates in Black American literature, including the writings of Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Arna Bontemps, and Langston Hughes. The course is designed to exercise students' skills as close readers, thoughtful researchers, and persuasive writers. Seminar participation is a requirement (25% of final grade). Compelling writing is a goal (60-75% of the final grade).
*ENG 304 is a pre-requisite of ENG 465                  

ENG 465 - SEMINAR IN ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES                                         Guerra
TR 9:35-10:55
"Confidence/Games." One way to understand the emerging aesthetics of culture in the nineteenth-century United States is by conceiving of them as engaging with a fundamental crisis of confidence-a crisis that continues to have significant currency in our own moment. As rural populations ventured into a society of strangers in the city, as social reform threatened/promised to change cultural traditions and politics, and as modern methods of marketing and sales emerged, authors and other producers of popular culture strove to create viable models of agency whereby the unfamiliar might be familiarized, whereby one could know where one stood within the social body as a whole. Etymologically, the word "confidence," often employed by these same producers, refers to a "together faith," hearkening to the necessarily social grounds for this agency as it was conceived in this period. What did this confidence entail? How was it achieved and how was it exploited? We'll get at this by examining important works of literature that engage with the theme, in addition to more ephemeral cultural products that, contrary to the antisocial view sometimes taken of literature, explicitly engage with a kind of social contract between players-that is, games. By fleshing out the specific logic of mid-nineteenth-century games, and understanding the way interaction and agency were materially and procedurally figured in these objects of rule-bounded play, we'll come to a closer understanding of how books also required and enabled similar modes of sociality and material engagement on the part of their readers. By using games as contemporary sources of both thematic and material concerns in the period, we will deeply explore the interface of agency and print-technology that facilitated (and troubled) confidence in an era of unprecedented change.                                                                                                            
Readings may include Herman Melville's The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade, Nathaniel Hawthorne's utopian satire The Blithedale Romance, George Thompson's sensational and salacious Venus in Boston, and Hannah Crafts' recently uncovered The Bondswoman's Narrative. A number of historical games, from billiards and Tangrams to board games and early "Mad Libs"-like puzzles will also be examined in order to develop native theoretical models we might apply to literature.

ENG 465 - SEMINAR IN ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES                                        Staff
MWF 1:50-2:45
A comprehensive review of the problems confronting the literary scholar, with emphasis on the theory and methodology of literary study. Repeatable for a total of 6 credits.
Prerequisite: ENG 304 or instructor permission.

ENG 485 - WORDS IN THE WORLD                                                                                        Murphy, M.
MWF 1:50-2:45
The Words in the World capstone course partners students with local and regional non-profits, businesses, government agencies, and grassroots organizations to work on real-world writing projects.  These projects challenge students to draw on and expand the strong writing and rhetorical skills they have developed across four years as English majors.  As part of this work, students are asked to compose a "narrative of aspirations" that asks them to think deeply about their intellectual skills and temperaments, ultimately imagining a set of potential professional identities consistent with and following from the intellectual commitments they have made as English majors.  Drafts of the narrative, a résumé, and a cover letter will be due during the first week of classes (instructions will be sent in advance of the first meeting); after receiving peer critique, writers will review project descriptions proposed by partners and revise their job documents accordingly.  Interviews will follow, after which writers and partners will be matched.  By the end of the semester, writers should be able to: 1) identify the writing needs of a community organization or business; 2) carry out research and conduct ongoing dialogue with key constituents to refine a sense of audience and purpose; 3) imagine and design specific documents through which to address that audience and purpose; 4) demonstrate effective cooperative work strategies; 5) complete agreed-upon, writing-based projects on a deadline; and, 6) analyze and interpret the effectiveness of the writing in line with the client's goals.
For examples of the sorts of projects Words in World students have found themselves in a position to write in previous semesters, see the white paper on hydrofracking composed by
Alex Bissell for the Onondaga Nation available at:  http://www.oswego.edu/academics/colleges_and_departments/departments/english/Alex_Bissell.html
or Marilyn Borth's article on the abortion debate for the Syracuse New Times at:
http://www.syracusenewtimes.com/the-most-polarizing-issue-in-america/

ENG 489 - WOMEN AND SCREEN STUDIES                                                                            Shore
M 6:10-8:00
Since Eadweard Muybridge documented the nude female body in motion in his 1880s photographic studies, women's relationships to the visual screen have been fraught in terms of representation, spectatorship and identity. This course will study the histories and theories of these fraught relationships by examining representations of women on screen, theories of cinematic spectatorship and gender, cultural conditions of gendered reception and industrial conditions shaping gender and representation.