Meteorology Alumni

Meteorology Alumni - this is your page.

Send us e-mail about what you are doing and we will post it here. If you have any old photos you would like to post, send them too. We can also post job announcements if you wish.

1983 Meteorology Grads
Graduation 1983.

1999 Meteorology Grads
Graduation 1999.

1999 Meteorology Grads
Graduation 2005.

Augustin Busschaert - 1998
I am currently a contract employee of the GHG corporation at the NASA Flight Facility at Wallops Island, Virginia. My official position title is Meteorological Technician. My job responsibilities include launching a wide variety of radiosondes, including the routine 12Z and 00Z flights, experimental ozonesondes, chaff balloons ( weather balloons strung to aluminum foil bowties, 8 inch spheres, or corner reflectors used for radar targeting and tracking exercises ). I also hope to launch Aerostats in the near future ( blimp-shaped weather balloons used for controlled ascent to measure different levels of the lower atmosphere ). I am also a certified weather observer, continually taking, recording, and announcing hourly weather observations at the base. They keep us busy here at NASA with the continual barrage of weather-related research projects. I am also a former meteorological intern for the NWS in Jackson, Mississippi, and I was a broadcast meteorologist at National Weather Networks that produced 97 twenty-second-long forecasts for cities from coast to coast updated on a daily basis. These video forecasts were rendered over the internet on www.broadcast.com and www.weatherama.com. I hope that any prospective meteorology graduates, or anybody that is considering entering the meteorology program at SUNY Oswego will be encouraged by my testimony. I have greatly enjoyed every one of my employments since my December '98 graduation, and I have learned alot from being on TV and working for the U.S. government. I know that meteorology is often downplayed because it is often hard to find a job in the field or make decent money when leaving college. I just want to say that I have been offered five different weather related jobs since I graduated a little over a year ago, and I am presently making over 40K a year. I want to thank Dr. Ballentine, Dr. Stamm, and Dr. Chermack for making Oswego State a launching pad for the rest of my life. Stick with it, work hard, and it will pay off in the long run...

Augustin Busschaert
PO Box 591
Chincoteague Island, VA 23336
augustinbusschaert@hotmail.com

Dan Dowling - 1996
Greetings from the Champlain Valley! After graduating Oswego in '96, I went back to school at SUNY Plattsburgh and got another bachelors degree in television broadcasting. Being the only meteorologist on the entire campus, I was given tons of opportunities to grow and develop both my forecasting and on-air skills. After graduating in Dec. 1998, I was picked up by the CBS station on the other side of the lake, in Burlington, Vermont. The weather is a little less challeging to forecast than that of Oswego, but its a beautiful place to live.

The Oswego Meteorology web site has come a long way in just a few years. I really enjoy the weathercam. I can't wait to watch the lake snow bands roll in when winter comes around. It makes me miss the place even more. I want to thank you, Dr. Chermak and Dr. Balentine for all your help and support over the years. Its great to hear how well everyone is doing all across the country. Please pass my email along (dowling@wcax.com) to anyone looking to get in touch, or just looking to break into tv weather. I hope all is well in Oswego these days. I plan to visit soon.

Dan Dowling
Class of 1996
dowling@wcax.com

Aaron Mentkowski - 1996
I have been down here in Fort Myers for the past 16 months. I started in Macon Ga doing weekend weather on 13wmaz. I moved to Fort Myers for the Morning show on ABC, WZVN channel 7. I recently got my AMS seal which I am very happy with, and have used my Oswego education exponentially. I have redesigned the Doppler radar look at the station and have numerous little weather projects going in the community. If any future grads need any help in the TV medium, tell them to feel free to contact me.

Thanks Again
Aaron Menktowski
MET 96'

Jason Puma - 1994
Greetings! I recently visited the SUNY Oswego Meteorology Student and Faculty homepages and saw the Alumni page and so I thought I'd drop a line. I must say that it is great to see the progression of the Student run page, as I remember starting out doing the student forecasts through the old gopher system with Brian Montgomery. I also think the "weather cam" is a great addition also. In my position with the National Weather Service, we have used the BUFKIT program, and I found Dr. Ballentine's name in the credits for the MM5 data. Although our office didn't use that data in our location, it was great to see Oswego participating.

Shortly after graduating, I was hired as a Meteorologist Intern with the National Weather Service at Lexington KY. The modernization of the Weather Service closed down the Lexington office in March of 1996, and I was transferred to the forecast office in Milwaukee WI. A highlight in Milwaukee included operating the NOAA Weather Radio System during the Oakfield WI tornado in July 1996. I also worked on the tornado survey team that rated this tornado an F5. A Meteorologist Intern position the NWS currently involves data management, public service, and monitoring the NOAA Weather radio system. As in intern, I was also involved with the Cooperative observer program, which included installing weather measuring equipment at volunteers homes or businesses.

In December 1998, I was promoted to a Journeyman forecaster position at the NWS office in Indianapolis IN. In my new position, I produce Public and Aviation forecasts, and Severe Weather Warnings for Central Indiana. The Weather Service has allowed me to continue do work that I enjoy, forecasting the weather and serving the public, as well as seeing a bit of our country.

I credit the SUNY Oswego staff for their strong meteorology program, and support outside the classroom. As part of the forecasting contests, I remember numerous forecast discussions, with staff and classmates that were instrumental in learning the forecasting process. This open learning environment was one thing that attracted me to Oswego from day one.

Thanks, and keep up those student forecasts! -

Jason Puma
Class of 1994
Jason.Puma@noaa.gov

John Sherwin - 1996
I am employed as a storm warning meteorologist at WeatherData Incorporated in Wichita, KS. As a storm warning meteorologist, my job requires me to issue site-specific warnings based on individually designed warning criteria. Warning criteria varies greatly depending on the client. Some of our clients include Union Pacific, Southern Pacific, Burlington Northern Santa Fe, Chrysler, Boeing, and Cessna. Our warning service covers over 25,000 miles of railroad track in the U.S. and Canada. In addition to warning services, WeatherData provides forecasts for newspapers, utilities, and forensic meteorology. Any graduating seniors interested in working at WeatherData should send a resume and cover letter to.....

WeatherData Incorporated
Ms. Sharol Youngers
245 N. Waco Suite 310
Wichita, KS 67202

I compliment the met faculty at Oswego for preparing its students to enter the job market with forecasting skills not taught at other colleges. The majority of meteorologits I work with graduated from the "big names" in meteorology such as Oklahoma, Texas A&M, Wisconsin, etc. They constantly complain that they weren't "prepared" for a career as a forecaster, and that the larger schools are only interested in theory, research, and graduate students. I hope this information is helpful and I wish you a great spring semester.

If you have any questions, feel free to email me at sherwin@southwind.net!

Thanks, John Sherwin, Class of 1996

Dave Serke- 1994
I graduated with my Master's Degree in Meteorology from Texas A&M in December 1996. My thesis was entitled "Evolution of the Southeast Pacific ITCZ in Boreal Spring as viewed from SSM/I and SSM/T-2", and my advisors were Dr. J. P. McGuirk and Dr. T. T. Wilheit. My research focused on utilizing the microwave imager and profiler on board the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) with respect to the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of a double ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone) that often develops along the equator in the East Pacific. In September 1996, I began working in the Solar Terrestrial Physics Division at NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. My job title is "DMSP Data Services Manager" and my duties are to provide DMSP data and support from our archive to the customers. Customers include the scientific research community, publishers, the U.S. and international governments and the U.S. military. I also maintain NGDC's website, attend conferences and do personal research with the data. Some of the uses of our data include visible and charged particle auroral studies, nighttime lights of the world products, hurricane studies as well as wildfire and smoke detection. My career at SUNY Oswego provided a great launching pad for my career, and the faculty provided the right mix of skills, patience and facilities for the basis for my advanced degree.

Dave Serke
DMSP Data Services Manager
Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

NOAA/NGDC 325
Broadway, Code E/GC2
Boulder, CO 80303

dserke@ngdc.noaa.gov
(303)497-6126

Mike Robinson - 1994
I just graduated with my Master's degree in meteorology from Texas A&M this past summer. My thesis was entitled "Characteristics of Convective Cells Over the Coastal Regions of Southeast Texas" and my advisor was Mike Biggerstaff. In my research, I used vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) and CG lightning statisitics to differentiate storm intensity based upon MCS mesoscale organization, MCS evolution stage, synoptic-scale forcing, and over-land vs over-water location. In August 1997, I began working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as part of the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) project. My job entails receiving radar data from the four primary satellite ground-validation sites and removing spurious echo (clutter, AP, clear-air return) which may bias rain accumulation statistics. I enjoy the job very much.

Mike Robinson
Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology
University of Maryland Baltimore County

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
mail code 902
Greenbelt, MD 20771

mrobin@tsdis01.nascom.nasa.gov
(301)614-5544

William E. Smith - 1977
I graduated from Oswego in May 1977. From there, I attended The Penn State Graduate School at the Meteorology Department where I served as a teaching assistant. I transferred to The University of Nebraska, where I earned a Masters of Science degree in 1982 from the College of Agriculture. My thesis was on evapotranspiration and irrigation scheduling.

Shortly after I left Nebraska, I started work at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. I was a programmer/analyst and I worked on Global Climate Models and the analysis of satellite data.

I currently work for Steve Meyers and Associates. They are subcontractors for what is now Raytheon (formerly Hughes), which is working on a contract for the Earth Sciences project for NASA. Specifically, the contract is for the Earth observing system Core System (ECS). It is a data management system for the data that will be received from satellites that will be launched during the next few years.

The satellites are for the Earth Observing System (EOS). The first launches (for the AM-1 and Landsat 7 satellites) are planned for early next year. Landsat 7 is an imaging spacecraft, while the AM-1 satellite is a platform for several instrument packages. There will be instruments for measuring air pollution, infrared radiation, temperature, etc. Data are to be collected and stored at several NASA run facilities known as Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs).

My previous assignment was to develop software to process the data. Then I moved on to troubleshoot and install computer programs written by the instrument teams. I am now assigned to the Goddard DAAC. We currently are testing the software that will process the data as it is received from the orbiting satellites. Specifically, we are working on the programs for the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument.

Regards,

William E. Smith/Class of 1977