Frequently Asked Questions

East Campus Renovation Project

What changes will happen to the East Campus?
What other changes will occur?
Over what time period will they occur?
What is the economic impact of the projects?
How much noise will there be?
Will there be any health hazards?
Is the College going to tear down houses?
How will traffic flow through the streets of the Ontario Heights neighborhood?
Will students continue to cut across 104 from parking on the south side, and what about their safety?
What about the Children’s Center—will they be impacted?
What is being considered for the future?
Who can I contact with questions or concerns?

Community Inquiries

Washington Blvd and Swift Street
Construction Vehicle Traffic Route
5th Avenue Traffic
Geothermal Drilling Affect on Existing Water Issues
Environmental Impact Studies Availability

What changes will happen to the East Campus?

Four major activities will affect the East Campus over the next 3-5 years. They are the new additions and renovations relating to a new Sciences Complex (Piez and Snygg Halls), the renovations of School of Education facilities (Park & Wilber Halls), the exterior preservation of historic Sheldon Hall, and the site plan enhancements including vehicular and pedestrian routes. Changes to support these East Campus will occur over three site coordination phases. Beginning in the summer of 2010, some parking areas adjacent to Piez hall will go offline, and some other parking zones will be expanded. Piez hall will be offline beginning fall 2010, and the fence line will be erected to allow the Sciences complex utility relocations to begin. The initial stage will also include the Snygg Hall lot becoming a contractor staging area and the creation of a geothermal well field. The second stage will occur in the fall of 2011 with the start of renovation of the Education complex, and the completion of some new site development associated with the overall development. Park Hall will go offline for renovation as part of this second stage. The last stage will happen in the fall of 2013 with the completion of the new Science complex, Wilber Hall coming offline for renovation, and the final components of the Sheldon Hall exterior will be progressed. The summer of 2014 is the target date for completion of the new Science complex, the renovated Education Complex and Sheldon Hall exterior renovations.
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What other changes will occur?

Further development of our learner centered culture will be supported through the creation of advanced and unique learning spaces, and the continuation of our campus internal/external “spine” linking the Hewitt and Sheldon quads. There will also be extensive changes to the landscape appearance and green spaces associated with the East Campus.
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Over what time period will they occur?

These changes will begin in the summer of 2010 and will be completed approximately in the summer of 2014.
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What is the economic impact of the projects?

The renovation and expansions associated with East Campus development will bring $170 million dollars and over 350 jobs to the local economy.
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How much noise will there be?

There will be a certain amount of noise associated with the normal construction activities. The new construction components will have noise similar to that experienced with the Campus Center project. The noise associated with the geothermal well field will be that typical to rotary well drilling rather than percussion type drilling.
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Will there be any health hazards?

The College will work with all regulatory agencies to ensure that all necessary reviews and health practices are in place to monitor construction and demolition.
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Is the College going to tear down houses?

The college has no intentions of tearing down any houses.
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How will traffic flow through the streets of the Ontario Heights neighborhood?

Concerns related to trucks and workers cutting though the north/south streets adjacent to campus (Sheldon, Draper, Baylis, Franklin) are recognized. At this point we do not know what routes the construction traffic will take. The College will seek solutions in conjunction with the Town of Oswego, City of Oswego and the residents themselves.
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Will students continue to cut across 104 from parking on the south side, and what about their safety?

The college is committed to ensuring that students are able to travel from peripheral parking lots to the main campus safely. We realize that these students sometimes walk from the Romney lot and other peripheral locations, through the Ontario Heights neighborhood, and will work to ensure their safety.
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What about the Children’s Center—will they be impacted?

Through the historic renovation of Sheldon Hall, the children’s center will get new windows as well as to being included in the other upgrades to the facilities. Parking and traffic flow will be considerate of safety for the children, families and workers.
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What is being considered for the future?

Traffic management planning concepts are being considered for vehicular flow and conflicts pertaining to East Campus. The current vehicular loop route, shuttle bus challenges and future sustainable initiatives are being reviewed with leaders of the surrounding communities. Possible turning lanes, control devices, or roundabouts are being conceptualized to mitigate the congestion on the corner of Washington and Sheldon; the possibilities of completing the loop road system by better understanding the Washington Blvd and Swift Street connection; working with National Grid to explore the possibility of eliminating some utility pole conflicts; and the possibly using 6th Ave north segment for a service zone for both campus and the city are items that are being discussed.
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Who can I contact with questions or concerns?

If you have a question you would like answered that is not addressed in the FAQ, please send them to obcr@oswego.edu and we will promptly post answers to them on this page.
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Washington Blvd and Swift Street Question

I live in the Eastside neighborhood. What do you mean by “…the possibilities of completing the loop road system by better understanding the Washington Blvd and Swift Street connection”?

There are accidents at this corner, and many near misses of traffic. It is nearly impossible for two cars to navigate the corner at the same time. In the winter, many cars have trouble stopping as they approach the tight turn. I have been told that busses used to go around this corner. Do you plan to use these streets for bus routes and large construction vehicles?

Response:

We recognize that the grading and banking of the Washington Blvd and Swift St intersection has had problems since it was created in the mid 1960's. We would like to work with the Town of Oswego (as these are town owned roads) and the surrounding community to work on a concept for improving that turn/intersection. We also would like to explore the possibility of having a road continue off the corner diagonally down the bank past Funnelle connecting to the east edge of the large parking lot circulation lane as a possible way of routing the campus loop road. Completing an effective loop road system for the campus is something we would like to further discussions on.

We are unsure exactly where construction traffic/trucks will access/exit the campus east zone. We can suggest routes, but are not able to indicate what public roads off-campus they may use. There were some suggestions offered at the public meeting relative to weight loads, speed limits, and possibly preferred routes that the Town of Oswego may review with us and the surrounding community. We want to get as much of the traffic on Washington Blvd off 104 without using the smaller side streets, but will have to work with contractors and the Town of Oswego to see if that is possible for all activity. Yes, the Centro bus did travel on Swift St at one time, and we are exploring options for bus and shuttle routes that may include Swift if practical, as well as other options.
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Construction Vehicle Traffic Route Question

The work done ealier on campus was not too noisy, but part of that is because the trucks delivered there loads to the North side of the buildings. If the trucks could be delivered from the east and then taken to the back side of the buildings by way of Washington Blvd using the traffic loop, it would make a lot less noise and also keep the traffic from coming down on the side streets. Otherwise the easiest road for the traffic would be Baylis becasue it is a straight shot into the lot. Unfortuately it is a very thin road and would not be the safest way for the residents in that area. If possible please give some thought to this suggestion as I believe it would make a lot of things easier for the residents who live near campus myself included.

Response:

Thanks for your feedback. We are considering the best access point for truck traffic to support the east campus development as coming from 104 and then via Washington Blvd from east and unsure of what contractors may choose from the west approach. We will encourage the 104 to Washington Blvd from 3rd ave option. We also will discourage use of smaller residential roads, but if they access the campus from main 104 entry their may be some conflicts with Swift. We will also discourage that approach.

As far as front (south) feeding vs back (north) feeding the construction zones, we believe that a majority of the approach will be from the south side from a construction sequencing and entry to work zones standpoint. We also recognize that their are multiple contracts/projects and will may require feeding the zone from both the north and south areas. The thought at this point is feeding Sciences from front side and Education buildings from back side.
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5th Avenue Traffic Question

Traffic questions for the multiple stage construction project did not mention 5th Avenue and did not address regular college staff and students (campus and communters) as to how traffic flows will change and impact the Ontario Heights neighbor hoods.

Response:

Our thought at this point is that 5th Avenue would continue to be used as part of the Centro campus bus route, as it is now. That is the route that allows for a safer access/crossing of 104 that then feeds through Barnes Drive (road by Romney and large parking lot) with the loop routes. The main entrance of campus is the other crossing point. We are exploring an enhanced smaller shuttle system that would link the large Romney parking area with east/central campus, in addition to the broader full bus loop. We are unsure at this time what route would be most for efficiency and end user satisfaction to promote the use of such. We are looking at ways to offset the temporary loss of parking spots on east campus, with new zoning strategies for resident students, some additional and expanded areas that will support parking needs, and a different approach to shuttle options.
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Geothermal Drilling Affect on Existing Water Issues Question

Certain streets for both the City of Oswego and Oswego Town in the Ontario Heights areas have exisiting water problems. How will the geothermal drilling to the proposed depths impact exisiting concerns for residents of these areas?

Response:

We believe the geothermal well drilling will have no impact to existing surface/ground water problems in Ontario Heights. We will ask that question of our consulting engineers for feedback also.
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Environmental Impact Studies Availability Question

Are environmental impact studies available for the first project for review? If not when will they be avaialble for review and or discussion.

Response:

The SEQR Environmental Impact Review is currently being initiated by the State University Construction Fund (SUCF) for the sciences project. They in conjunction with Cannon Design and the campus are in the process of completing the documentation. A review was not required for the smaller utility relocation project that is starting up soon. We will ensure the surrounding municipalities are contacted as part of the environmental review, and will have the document available for public review also.
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